Loft Conversion Planning permission

We have a 1970s semi-detached house with a truss roof. I see there are many firms that can convert trussed attics but we have an additional problem in that the height of the loft at the apex is inadequate (~1.8m).
We imagine that the roof would need replacing which throws up some obvious questions:
It would be too expensive to be worthwhile? We would never get planning permission to have one half of a semi with a different roofline to its adjoining neighbour?
I am working on the assumption that there is nothing that can be done but any thoughts or experiences would be welcome.
ROB
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many
It could be very difficult. If you have high ceilings in the floor below, you could drop the ceilings a little. However, a 1.8m trussed semi detached loft doesn't sound like much of a goer.
Christian.
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Its worthwhile if the cost is less than moving to a house with the extra room already there.
Its not the fact that each half of the semi will have a different roof, its the new roof in context with the other houses in the street.
If existing rooflines are in orderly rows and houses are all the same, then maybe not. If there is already lots of variety then maybe.
dg
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dg wrote:

Including the semi next door. I think it very likely the next door owners would withhold consent (if they have any sense) under the Party Wall legislation.

One answer to the semi problem is to enquire if the neighbours had considered converting their loft. It might then be cheaper to remove the existing roof in its entirety and replace with attic trusses with a higher ridge and with appropriate floor loading strength. (Because usually some height is lost in putting in a structural floor for the attic rooms.)
Owain
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The Party Wall legislation is irrelevent to this. The Party Wall legislation basically allows you to do lots of things to party walls (i.e. dampproofing, underpinning, inserting beams etc.) WITHOUT needing permission.
However, at the same time, it gives rights to your neighbour to appoint surveyors and repair damage at your expense.
However, the adjustment to the roof line is very likely to be prohibitive at the planning application stage, particularly if the neighbours object, and probably even if not.
Christian.
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Robert Flint wrote:

Ask yourself how badly do you want to do it? Do you really want to stay in this house rather than move? Are you likely to want to move in the next X years; if not you may consider it's worth spending the money if you're going to get the benefit of living in it for all that time (as opposed to taking a big hit if you were to sell in 2 years' time.

These things are very area-dependent, so nobody here can really give you a sensible answer. Just go and have an informal chat with your planning officer; take some photos along to show him the house and street. He can tell you how the land lies, so to speak, and you can judge whether it's even worth considering the project further.
David
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2006 15:36:55 -0000, "Robert Flint"

Im my experience getting PP to rasie a roof line is like getting Mrs T to do a "U Turn" - almost impossible.
You can look at dropping the floor, or possibly adding a dormer.
Rick
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