Replacement staircase.

Existing pine string with plywood risers and plasterboard back to hide the wedges. Brown wood stain so lots of work to improve.
Budget enquiry for a replacement in Oak with semi open risers starts at ?1800!
Anyone found a cheaper way?
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/18 20:01, Tim Lamb wrote:

Can you keep them and clad them?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 20:01:18 +0000, Tim Lamb wrote:


t

Choose a cheaper timber? Mind you there is a lot of work in consructing a staircase...
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 12 January 2018 20:53:50 UTC, Dave Liquorice wrote:



I have made several. No problem. Most cost less than £50.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmm, are you sure about that? Did you cost your time?
Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, 13 January 2018 08:48:05 UTC, Brian Gaff wrote:

Nope.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/01/2018 16:46, harry wrote:

I'm still impressed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Jan 2018 08:46:13 -0800 (PST), harry wrote:

Proper ones? With tapered slots and wedges to hold the risers and treads in place in the stringers?

So hardly a valid comparision to a cost that includes labour.
"Costing your time" is a curious one. If SWMBO'd doesn't think a task is "worth while" she'll use "... and have you included the cost of your time?". Then she'll nag me to say cut/split the accumulated wood pile into bits suitable for the woodburner, because it's free...
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Lamb wrote:

Have a play with the designer here ...
e.g. for all oak, with handrail/baluster to one side is £250 cheaper, tweak about with sizes and what bits you want in various materials
<http://www.stairbox.com/stairbuilder-staircase-designer/?dmVyc2lvbjIuMy11ay0yNjAwLTEzLTIyMi4xMi04NjUtODY1LTg2NS1ub25lLTNfd2luZGVyLW5vbmUtM193aW5kZXItTmFOLU5hTi1sZWZ0LWZ1bGwtbm9uZS1vYWstc3F1YXJlLTAtMC0wLTAtMC1vYWstb2FrLW9hay1vYWstb2FrLWFzc2VtYmxlZC1jb2xsZWN0ZWQtLWZhbHNlLTEtMC0wLTEtMC1ub25lLTAtMC0xLTAtbm9uZS0wLTEtMC0xLTAtMS0wLTAtMC0xLTAtMC0wLTEtMC0wLTAtMS0wLXN0cmFpZ2h0LTAtMC0wLTAtU1RELS1mYWxzZS1TcXVhcmVTcGluZGxlLTQxLTE0MC01OC0wLTA=
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm.. ?1100 without newel or banister. No option for open plan or half riser and I'm not sure what they mean by *engineered Oak*.
This what I would like:-) http://www.stairplan.com/boston-oak-open-riser-staircase.html
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2018 22:40, Tim Lamb wrote:

Engineered oak usually means real oak facing glued to a composite (ply or mdf) core.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Rumm wrote:

They do say that the treads are 22mm, but the 22mm risers only have a 9mm oak veneer, so maybe the other 'engineered' oak is finger jointed?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/18 22:40, Tim Lamb wrote:

Plywood made of layers of at least oak on the surface
--
Microsoft : the best reason to go to Linux that ever existed.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 12 January 2018 20:01:33 UTC, Tim Lamb wrote:


Sure. Find a tree, cut it down...
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes

Been there. Sadly the Lucas mill used to convert had a max cutting depth of 200mm. With a blunt blade would only cut 150mm reliably.
Just about seasoned now but an awful lot of jointing to get a step width.
The one in the farmhouse is nice although not entirely to building regs. Twin centre spine with chunky, no riser, steps. Parana Pine so not repeatable.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, 12 January 2018 22:41:08 UTC, Tim Lamb wrote:

t



Maybe time for a £100 alaskan mill. There are ways to do stairs relatively cheaply. Just spend ages googling fo r images.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2018 20:01, Tim Lamb wrote:

Probably not that bad if real oak...
(I bought some Americal White oak (kinl dried, sawn) the other day; 3 10' lengths of 6x2, and 4 8' lengths of 6 x 1.25 - did not get much change from £400!)

Only if you build it yourself from scratch... (which last time I did it, I actually quite enjoyed)
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm.. the stair sites claim selected White Oak and disparage Red. I've only seen it used as trailer flooring and thought it uninteresting grain wise.

Yes. I've got the tackle to do the job but time is pressing and it is a while since I could manage an 8 hour day:-(
There is a glimmer of hope as the boss has volunteered funds:-)

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/01/2018 09:19, Tim Lamb wrote:

I was not suggesting a particular species of wood for the project - more just illustrating that oak in general is not cheep. (Especially when you consider American white is usually cheaper than English oak. Not sure how Red compares price wise).

For a straight run like in your picture, its a pretty easy build - certainly not 8 hours of work for the stringers. If you go for the non traditional "fully captive" treads and risers like in the photo, its just a case of making a template, followed by lots of routing.
If you are buying sawn rather than prepared wood, you would spend most of your time preparing the timber rather than making the stairs. If you buy PAR, then you would likely have the whole thing knocked out in an afternoon!

That might change the cost benefit analysis ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Point taken.

I can do that bit. How do you suppose they secure the treads and half riser? I'm guessing glue/screw with the hole disguised with a plug.

I have a planer although that length might be tricky.

Indeed! On balance I think my time better spent on other jobs. I still have the bulk of the plumbing to do plus making and fitting doors to the various soffit/attic spaces to say nothing of installing the kitchen and utility tackle.

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.