repairing wood supporting post (pictures)

You can see from the pictures this is a corner post supporting a wooden roof, I will be back out there for a couple of weeks and need to repair this. Replacing the complete post is not an option due to sourcing and tools required. The rot goes about halfway through the post and maybe 4 inches high so it was my intention to make a copy (as best I can) from a 4 x 4 piece of wood then cut out the rot and replace with piece I take out with me. Would this be my best bet or should I clean it out and pack with some sort of filler.
thanks
http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h194/scudo/SeptTurk2012154_zps70bb0ac3.jpg
http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h194/scudo/SeptTurk20121572_zpsa5d8cd29.jpg
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Not a clever idea bodging a structural timber like that. Probably quicker and easier to replaceit anyway.
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In what country/climate is this building? Doesn't look British.
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You can see from the pictures this is a corner post supporting a wooden

The images suggest the post is holding the corner down as well as up so if you replace full width and depth how will you tie it in? If you really can't replace the whole post then option 2 is probably better, perhaps setting in a piece of wood to replace the rotten area pre carved to match the design.
If it were mine I would explore the extent of the rot by digging out all the decayed wood. Assuming its not rotted right through its not adding any strength so you wont do any harm. Stabilise what's left with preservative then make up, and glue in a piece of wood to replace what you have dug out.
Mike
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On 05/08/2013 16:29, Muddymike wrote:

In answer to previous reply its in Turkey, tradesmen dont exist and getting a replacment post a nightmare.
I only discovered this 2 days before I left on my last visit but preliminary check showed it wasnt all the way through, I pushed a screwdriver in as far as I could and it went no further than 2 inches. I have also got to work within what tools I have there which are basic.
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On Monday, August 5, 2013 4:41:27 PM UTC+1, ss wrote:

c3.jpg

d29.jpg

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I'd screw temporary supports to the existing good wood on the post before h acking any of it out. Failing that have a friend stand by with a video came ra. It'll look good on Youtube.
I'd also like to work out why it rotted in the first place.
Are the other posts o/k
It occurred to me that if you screwed short lengths of flat timber to the f our sides of the post reaching down to the pillar this would reinforce the post and help support the roof. For the sake of appearances you could repea t this on the other posts as well. Perhaps a small moulding could be pinned around the top of this wood as decoration.
Just random thoughts
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On 05/08/2013 18:07, fred wrote:

The other 15 posts are ok, so too many to do a moulding for all of them.
The rot is due to bad design, the bottom of the post sits in a brass holder that collects rainwater and this particular one catches it full on in Winter. Most of the year is dry and hot but in 2 months over winter the get more than the uk does all year.
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