Repairing a galvanised watering can

My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the best way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in the bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets and kettles years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this throw away age.
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wrote:

# There's a hole in my watering can, dear Liza, dear Liza .... #
Doesn't quite scan, does it?
;-)
--
Frank Erskine

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I believe I have such a repair kit somewhere in my granddad's box of "things that'll come in useful if I keep them long enough". From memory, it's just a couple of large steel washers with small holes and a nut and bolt. I think you added paper or rubber washers between the steel washers and the can, but nowadays I'd use a dab of silicone.
Chris
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snipped-for-privacy@proemail.co.uk wrote:

Ah, so that's why B & Q sell big washers as "repair washers".
Pete
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Epoxy. Buy yourself a "workshop starter pack" of a good epoxy like West System (Axminster), as it's extremely useful all round the workshop and well worth the fifteen(?) quid. This epoxy isn't thickened, so it'll run happily into the corner seam to a watering can. Clean it beforehand with a bit of acid etching (doesn't take much) with either hydrochloric or phosphoric, then rinse.
If it's a hole in a flat plate, well away from a seam or edge, then the traditional "pot mender" still works. This is two large washers with small holes, a nut & bolt, and a gooey sealer on one surface. Cork sheet used to be used, but these days a wipe of Hermetite etc. will do.
Otherwise just wipe an Oyltite stick over the hole. Borrow one from the stationary engine people in the newsgroup over the road.
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Broadback presented the following explanation :

Drill a hole through the (er..) hole. Find a nut, bolt and a couple of washers add a couple of rubber washers (tap washers?). Better if all these are rust proof/brass or etc..
The alternative would be to drill and fill with a small amount of car body filler from the inside.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 20:14:09 +0100, Harry Bloomfield

One more option, since it's galvanised, is to put a blob of solder on the zinc. Nuisance if there's rust around the hole, but a nice rustproof metal-to-metal repair otherwise.
Thomas Prufer
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Complete instructions here

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6h4LoMgqlI

--
geoff

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wrote:

If it were still galvanised, it wouldn't have a hole in it. I assume this is actually a rusty margin and would be a pain to try and solder to. If you do try it, use Baker's Fluid as a flux rather than hoping resin multi-core will work.
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On Jul 16, 8:14pm, Harry Bloomfield

Brass is the last thing (other than copper) to be in contact with zinc. Make sure they are completely electrically isolated.
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:30:57 +0100, Broadback wrote:

=================================Make sure the can is dry. Cover the hole on the outside with a bit of masking tape and then pour in some bitumastic paint to a depth of about 1/2". Leave to stand and the bitumastic will go solid. Store the can in a cool place when not in use.
Cic.
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Interesting, that's what Spouse did with an aluminium gallon milk pail I keep on the step for veg. washing water to put on the growing veg.
It had developed several tiny holes, too many to repair with washers.
So far the bitumen treatment has worked extremely well.
Mary
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