Removing hard putty from wooden window frame

The glass in an external wooden window frame is cracked and needs replacing. The putty at the bottom of the frame is cracking and easy to remove but the putty at the top and sides is rock solid. What is the best way to remove hard set putty without damaging the wooden frame?
Thanks
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On 24/03/2012 08:27, Alt Beer wrote:

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Painting+Decorating/Decorators+Tools/Hacking+Knife+115mm/d150/sd160/p12804
But IME it's a brutish implement, designed to butcher the frame. You could use a Stanley knife to score a line where wood meets putty. Often the putty will lift when the glass is removed.
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*Hammer* and *use with care* don't go together well but I find the hacking knife does the job. Bared wood can be re-primed before fitting fresh glass.
regards
--
Tim Lamb

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And of course there is always a tiny nail or two there to grunge up the end of the knife on as well!
Brian
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Brian Gaff - snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk
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Heat softens it some.
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Alt Beer wrote:

Smash the glass out - seriously, try to do it in large pieces to make it easier to handle, and once it's out, you've got an edge to work with. An old wood chisel is about best for this job
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Alt Beer wrote:

Smash the glass out - seriously, try to do it in large pieces to make it easier to handle, and once it's out, you've got an edge to work with. An old wood chisel is about best for this job
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Phil L wrote:

Agreed - and to add to Phil L's advice, use gloves and googles [1] and put a large dustsheet down to catch the broken shards, and empty this straight into the wheelie bin when done.
As for preventing damage to the frame - almost impossible with hard putty that's stuck well into the frame. When used to do the job, I simply took my time and filled in any damage when applying and finishing the putty, and then touched up the paintwork.
[1] I'm not a health and safety 'nut', but a splinter of glass in an eye and cuts to the fingers are bloody painful - believe me!
Cash
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On Sat, 24 Mar 2012 08:27:25 +0000, Alt Beer wrote:

I used a straightedge with a knife to create a groove along the seam, then a putty knife placed in the groove and gently tapped with a hammer worked well to lift the old putty. Then take the glass out and clean up the frame edges before priming.
cheers
Jules
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/removing-hard-putty-from-wooden-window-frame-797956-.htm dresden wrote:
Alt Beer wrote:

i have always used an old finger pointing trowel, using a blow lamp heat up the trowel and hold the trowel on the putty for a few mins , then using a putty knife pare the old putty out . this method has never failed me no matter how old the putty was -------------------------------------
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On 13/05/2012 19:31, dresden wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/removing-hard-putty-from-wooden-window-frame-797956-.htm
Unless you need to replace the glass, I'd leave the hard stuff in place and just reputty the bottom half
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