removing gas hob

Hello,
I have a gas hob that I think I would like to replace with an induction hob. Mainly because I think that an induction hob will be easier to clean than a gas one!
I'm old enough to remember the cook-cook-cook-cookability adverts for gas! Is induction nearly as good?
I did wonder whether to buy one of the hobs that has some induction and some gas, I thought I could use the gas if there was a power cut. But realistically when was there a power cut? I'd probably be better buying an all-induction hob.
Now I know that the official advice is get a gas safe person to do it unless you are competent but if I paid someone to do it, what exactly would they do? Just solder an end cap on? It would be nice to know what job I need them to quote for and to make sure they are not doing anything more/less than required!
Thanks, Stephen.
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Well to start with he/she ought to start with a full system soundness test. That might discover a fault you are blissfully unaware of. On completion a second soundness test should be carried out.
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On 18/10/2018 14:43, Cynic wrote:

Make yourself a U tube manometer by taping some transparent tubing down one side of a ruler and up the other. How to use it can be found on the web.
I'm a recent convert to an induction hobs - they're excellent/
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On 18/10/2018 14:00, Stephen wrote:

Better
As part of a kitchen refurb we installed an induction hob. It seems to be much more controllable, particularlt at low heats e.g. cooking apples without burning them. Two points 1 you will probably need new pand . - test your existing pas with a magnet. - if it dous not stick you will have to buy new compatible pans (swmbo used this as an excuse to replce our 40yr old collection
2 To gain the full power advantage you will have to run a 32A supply separate from the oven BUT there are hobs around which will adjust their power consumption so that a 13A socket can be used. one ring ant full power but more using modulatede power. Ours is a Siemens
Malcolm
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On 18/10/2018 14:00, Stephen wrote:

It might have a bayonet connection that you just unplug.
Mike
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On 18/10/2018 15:43, Muddymike wrote:

IIRC these are supposed to be used only with traditional cookers, hobs are supposed to be plumbed in direct (although I am sure there are plenty around converted to rubber hoses).
If you are competent and confident with soldering 15mm copper it's not a big deal to blank off your feed somewhere (perhaps ideally at the take-off from your 22mm going to the boiler). A decent plumber won't take long and should not charge too much but obviously they have to cover their travel and overheads even if they only take ten minutes.
If you DIY and then burn the house down some day you might have to convince the insurance company that you were, in fact, competent. As another poster has said, the key thing is to do a leak test after you do the work. This involves fitting a manometer to the gas meter (not difficult) and switching off your boiler. If your plumber does not do this be very very worried. There is a risk of course that this test reveals a fault elsewhere that you were not aware of.
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On 18/10/2018 17:20, newshound wrote:

<snip>

IIRC that's been done to death here over the years - including when we had authorised ( CORGI as was) installers commenting. AIUI the position is accurately reflected in the Wiki:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Gas_fitting_FAQ
"Generally fixed appliances are supplied with fixed pipework, but unless prohibited by the manufacturers instructions, may also be connected via a flexible hose (note there is some confusion in this area since subsequent issues of BS 6172 went from initially being silent on the issue, to prohibiting the use of flexible hoses, and then altering the language subtly between revisions such that they were again permitted)."
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On 18/10/2018 14:00, Stephen wrote:

In my view, better. I wanted a gas hob but 'Senior Management' wanted induction. I was a good choice. Control is precise, easy to clean, virtually instant heat, ......
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On 18/10/2018 18:11, Brian Reay wrote:

I've been very impressed. But I have a collection of favourite but unsuitable pans.
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On 18/10/2018 14:00, Stephen wrote:

No.
It's better.
A LOT better.
More controllable, higher max power output, and less waste heat and water (from combustion) into the kitchen.
Only downside is you can't use a wok - though there are even solutions for that. I just use a sauté pan.
Andy
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On 22/10/18 21:29, Vir Campestris wrote:

Out of interest, are gas hobs really less than 25% efficient as a heat source? Assuming 100% efficiency for induction, gas costs around 5p per kWh and electricity 20p per kWh. So they would have to be less than 25% efficient to compare with induction for the same cost of a kWh.

Also, you can't have a hot meal during a prolonged power cut. But I guess you could get the barbecue out of storage... :-)
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On 23/10/2018 07:27, Jeff Layman wrote:

Don't know how much less efficient - but they are less efficient to some amount.
Say they're 50%. That means twice as much heat into the kitchen. Which can be a problem, as can the extra water.
The cost of running a hob is trivial compared with heating.
Andy
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On 23/10/18 21:25, Vir Campestris wrote:

Taking everything into account (power generation, etc), it would appear that gas is marginally the most efficient. It is certainly cheaper. <https://www.theguardian.com/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-2452,00.html > Say they're 50%. That means twice as much heat into the kitchen. Which

A problem in summer, but less so in winter. Extra water would be, unless there is a hood which vents to the outside

True, but the initial cost of changing from a gas hob to an induction hob could be high, particularly if new pots and pans are needed. Depending on how much hob cooking is done, it could take years for the cost to be recouped, if ever.
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Jeff

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