Remiving plastic "frosted glass" file from window?

An upstairs en-suite has had plastic film applied to a window to give privacy.
This is now yellowing and peeling off around the edges.
Is there a good method of removing this prior to fitting new film?
The most obvious method seems to be dissolving the glue holding it on. Big question is which solvent to use.
Possible ones could be nail varnish remover and automotive thinners.
Alternative might be gently(!) heating with a hot air gun.
Interwebs give all sorts of answers including a scraper and wire wool and "just prise the corners up then peel off".
TIA
Dave R
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On 16/07/2015 11:02, David wrote:

All depends on the plastic and the glue, some films go brittle and can be a PITA to remove. Agree that hot air gun might well help. The other solvent which is well worth trying is "Label Remover". Although it won't penetrate the film like the way it penetrates paper labels, these can be very effective on sticky glue residues after you have got the film off, some of these resist acetone (nail varnish remover) or alcohol (meths or IPA). You could also try white spirit.
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2015 14:00:16 +0100, newshound wrote:

Thanks
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Or even petrol.
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2015 20:15:26 +0100, ARW wrote:

Something that /might/ work is a terpene-based cleanser. I've one that seems to remove most things when used neat, even polyurethane foam/glue.
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On Fri, 17 Jul 2015 09:11:14 +0100, PeterC wrote:

Had to Google for that.
So - cleaners based on citrus fruit, often on a component in orange peel.
Google didn't offer me any from a UK source, but I haven't tried very hard yet.
Halfords did do a citrus based chain cleaner, so this may be in the same area.
Do you have a brand name and source for your effective cleaner?
Cheers
Dave R
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On 7/17/2015 5:52 AM, David wrote:

I've used 'Goo-Gone'. I think I bought it from Lakeland, but I see that it's available on Amazon.
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On 17 Jul 2015 09:52:22 GMT, David wrote:

Yes, Ecover, but I didn't put it in as it's no longer made. It's flammable when undiluted, perhaps that's why. The neares on Ecover's site do contain limonene (from oranges, but only as perfume). Try looking for citrus-based stuff or look up limonene and see if there are any clues. I've seen citrus-based cleansers in shops but have'nt read the details. I have about 600ml left and when that runs out...
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I've recently started using solvent uPVC cleaner from Wickes for these kinds of odds-n-sods cleaning jobs. I have no idea what's in it, but it smells nice & it seems to dissolve more-or-less anything.
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On 17/07/2015 09:11, PeterC wrote:

I think that's one of the secrets of Label Removers
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Hmm, I know in one case this was fitted inside the double glazed unit which meant a whole new unit had to be fitted of course :-)
What is the frame made of? If its plastic then you need to be careful with solvents or heat. Brian
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On 16/07/2015 11:02, David wrote:

Peel away from the top and use WD40. The light oil prevents the solvent from evaporating too quickly - before the glue has softened.
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Basically its a case of peeling a bit off and first trying stuff that you already have - WD40, petrol/lighter fuel, white spirit, Isopropyl alcohol, actetone etc applied with an artist size paintbrush ( non synthetic - bristle or hair when applying acetone) into the join, and allowed to soak in.
Basically it may be a case of painting it into the join, and peeling back it back bit by bit.
If none of the readily available substances does the trick then maybe its then time to try one of the proprietary solutions.
michael adams
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2015 10:02:46 +0000, David wrote:

Report back.
Borrowed a Karcher steamer and the steam (through a small brush tool) softened the plastic so it didn't tear as much and softened the glue so the film would peel off. If allowed to cool a bit it became brittle and sticky again.
A wallpaper scraper helped to get it started. As far as I can tell using the scraper left a little glue on the window, whilst peeling off in a cloud of steam seemed to take the glue with the film.
Anyway, one nasty job over and done with.
Glue residue not a problem because there is a new sheet of sticky film going on the window.
Cheers
Dave R
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