Recs for Extension lead please


"Rod Speed" wrote in message

That's a lot of bottles.
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On 25/09/2018 20:06, Bertie Doe wrote:

Much depends on the layout and the size of the room. If it could be tucked out of the way in an airing cupboard for example, then its low risk. If you have to clime over it to get into the shower, less so ;-)

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"John Rumm" wrote in message

Despite the obvious risks, the bath is becoming more attractive. Use of the shower is not a problem as showering's take place pre 9am and post 9pm.
My last kitchen brew had spillage issues and the tops of the walls were soaking. Inadequate extractor fan and a small window is the main culprit. The bathroom has a ceiling mounted Velux window and a powerful extractor.
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On 25/09/2018 17:49, John Rumm wrote:

A cassette lead isnot a good idea as the lead needs to be fully unwound for this rating, to avoid inductive heating. With acassette lead there will always be the temptation to wind in any spare.
Malcolm
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On Tue, 25 Sep 2018 23:30:58 +0100, Malcolm Race wrote:

The issue of unwound extension cables overheating has nothing whatsoever to do with *inductive* effects. It is purely a matter of concentrating the cable into a compact, low surface area lump which reduces the heat dissipation rate of the I squared R losses in the cable when carrying its fully unwound maximum rated current.
The reduced dissipation rate results in a much higher temperature equilibrium being established in order to dissipate this waste energy into the environment. Furthermore, copper having a significantly positive temperature coefficient of resistance which can create a runaway effect, will aggravate this temperature rise in an unwound cable to a surprising degree. So much so that anecdotes about such wound up cables being turned into a welded mass of PVC and copper are quite common.
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Johnny B Good

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On Wednesday, 26 September 2018 00:26:56 UTC+1, Johnny B Good wrote:

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in a

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e
induction doesn't happen to any significant extent, and if it did it wouldn 't cause heating. Why? Each bit of flex has currents flowing in equal and o pposite directions.
NT
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On Wednesday, 26 September 2018 03:42:20 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Unless you have pretty horrific Zs and parallel earth paths through the plumbing.
Owain
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On Wednesday, 26 September 2018 07:54:09 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

it's not entirely impossible to miswire an immersion heaer so you end up with lots of CPC current. That would create inductance, but still not heating of the coiled extension lead.
NT
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On Tue, 25 Sep 2018 23:26:54 GMT, Johnny B Good wrote:

I made a (very crude) reel for my 27m extension lead. I start rewinding by tucking the double socket into the centre, so it has to be fully unwound to use it. The highest load so far is under 1kW, so not much on 1.5 mil.
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Malcolm Race has brought this to us :

Many do think the problem is inductive, but there is not induction because the flow in the live, is cancelled by that in the neutral. The problem is the resistive heating. The cable warms up because of resistance, the close coiling limits the ability to dissipate the heat and the cable melts.
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On 26/09/18 08:58, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

+1.
Its hard to see what could in fact be heated 'by induction'
Not as though the reels are made of magnetic material...
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"Saki"
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