Recommended filler for plasterboard repairs

As a result of (re)moving various sockets and other fixings in plasterboard walls I shall be repairing the resulting holes by means of the often recommended method of cutting suitably sized pieces of plasterboard and securing them in the holes from behind.
I will obviously need to do some filling, not only for any gaps between the edges of the insert and the hole but also to bring the level of the insert up to the surrounding skim coat. Can anyone recommend a particular type of filler/plaster/whatever for doing this? Ideally, a product recommendation such as Polycell XYZ would be ideal as there appears to be a bewildering array of products out there, many of which I'm sure are duplicates under different names or otherwise equally suitable for the job but a personal recommendation of 'the best' based on past experience would be very helpful.
I shall be painting the walls and so am hoping for a similar surface finish to (painted) plaster so as not to show up afterwards. Also, this is a one-off task so paying a premium for ready-mixed filler is entirely acceptable if it aids in the likelihood of a successful job first time around.
Mathew
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You need to use "Easy-Fill" from Gyproc. Excellent feathering, easy mixing and easy sanding.
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On Wed, 03 Nov 2010 13:26:23 -0700, Mathew Newton wrote:

============================================================================= Many fillers have a matt finish when dry which produces a different texture to skim coat even when painted. To get a good match consider doing the job in two stages; do the patching first, leaving the patched areas below the finish level and follow up with standard skim coat plaster to match the existing skim. Polyfilla works well but 'One coat' plaster works just as well and is workable for much longer.
A good way to patch is to cut a piece of plasterboard to a loose fit. Cut a piece of scrim (or gauze bandage) bigger all round than the cut piece of plasterboard and coat liberally with a *sloppy* mix of filler. Place the cut piece of plasterboard on the scrim and work the plasterboard/ scrim/filler into the hole making sure that it fits snugly. Spread the overlap of the scrim around the hole to keep the patch in position. Correctly done this produces a repair almost the same texture as the original plasterboard. Spray the edges of the hole to be repaired liberally with water before inserting the patch.
When the repairs have cured finish off with standard skim coat as suggested above.
Cic.
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Cicero wrote:

POV endorsed. Use bonding to glue the patch together, and a skim of final over the top.
Sand it all down a bit if you are crap at plastering.
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On 03/11/2010 23:31, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

If planning on sanding, go for one of the "Board Fill" fillers designed for taped and filled plasterboard joints. They apply nicely and sand very well.
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Cheers,

John.

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I've not found any filler, other than fine surface fillers and rough plasters, that have failed to work just fine. Even rice gives a good finish with the right technique.
NT
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On 03/11/2010 20:26, Mathew Newton wrote:

Go ready mixed with RED DEVIL ONETIME (Google it)
'tis the dogs "danglies".
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On 04/11/2010 09:13, Vortex7 wrote:

Of course the septics call it "spackling". I found this:
http://www.reddevil.com/index.php?main_page=page&id 
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions, and general tips for the repairs.
I note from the archives some anecdotal mention of filler sometimes showing through emulsion hence some form of sealer is worthwhile. Hence, my next and final question: what sealer would you recommend? Purpose-designed 'primer sealer' or standard oil-based undercoat? Either way, is it acceptable to just paint the affected areas (perhaps feathering the edges) rather than covering the entire wall to achieve a constistent surface to then paint over?
Mathew
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