Re: Single Glazed, Timber Framed Windows



I presume this is for a shed or something? It would be illegal to install in a house, except in some specific cases.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

No, its not.
Provided the insulation is up to scratch.
A fully triple glazed conservatory will average out at a U value of about 1.8.
A fully insulated wall with a 10% window area of SG glass will average out at 0.5 or so.
You work out which is better on total thermal loss...and fortunately the BCO are also aware. You just have to do the calculations to prove it.
Note that no conservatory OUGHT to be allowed under he rules at all, - they only slip through on teh 'elemental method'

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in
That was one of the specific cases I had in mind. However, that's a lot of calculations. You would have to ensure that the heating efficiency and insulation of the entire house exceeded modern specifications to the extent that there is some slack to allow single glazing. Given that the house probably doesn't have such a specification unless built in the last year or two, you would then need to rectify this. (Not a bad thing, in itself, but a little excessive to just install a window).
It would almost certainly be simpler and cheaper to install a BS double glazed window, which can look fantastic, as my parent's did with their sashes. You have to look very closely to see that they are double glazed.

They do no such thing. The elemental method requires <25% glazing. They slip through on a special exemption, provided some rules are followed such as independent heating controls (preferably no heating at all) and external grade separation from the house (i.e. they must be separated from the house such that they are considered exterior for the house calculations including, normally, double glazed windows and wall insulation, depending on the method used).
Christian.
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windows.
install in

Maybe the house is listed?
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That's one of the other specific cases. However, the listed building consent is likely to require a bit more than finding any old window off the internet. You probably have to spend 600 times the normal price to have one carved out of 600 year old wood using only a spatula by the only person certificated to do it, who lives in a Pacific island commune with a ship once a year.
Christian.
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consent
have one

person
ship
You're probably right, but for what it's worth my house is listed with UPVC DGUs and the conservation officer intimated he'd be happy with more-or-less any plain timber-framed single glazed units as replacements. Of course, what he says now, and what happens if/when I apply for LBC could be entirely different...
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Presumably anything is an improvement over uPVC. Except that listing might be for the as-is condition. I wouldn't be surprised if they made you manufacture the exact pattern of 1970's uPVC it has now when you come to replace, even if it was a seventeenth century cottage...
Christian.
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with
might
to
As I said, what he says now, and what he says if it comes to an actual application...
Neil
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wrote in message> > Presumably anything is an improvement over uPVC. Except that listing

Is it ok to replace say Vic sash windows with other original Vic sash windows then? They would be single glaed of course, and come undraughtproofed, though draughtproofing isnt too hard on those.
Regards, NT
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N. Thornton wrote:

The answer is it depends.
If you're listed then yes.
If the original windows are still in situ then you can have them "restored" even if this means replacing all of the original material.
If the windows have been replaced with modern ones you can't go back UNLESS you find the origial ones at the end of the garden in which case you can put those back in and restore them.
Original or restored windows can be single glazed but new ones must be double glazed and with low e glass.
Thus spoke my BCO
Nick PS Amazingly my carpenter 'found' my old windows at the back of his workshop and was able to restore them to good as new condition!!
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What luck! I imagine he's probably got an enormous workshop, full of the old windows that were installed in all the houses in the vicinity :-)
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Neil Jones wrote

I can see why he said single glazed. The standard double-glazed timber windows from the likes of Magnet and Jeld-Wen are hideous - the timber sections are even wider than uPVC and the glass areas are minute. Over the past 20 years I've made new single glazed softwood casement windows to match the original 1920's windows for all the windows in my house except for the Bathroom. I used to get standard Ovolo moulded sash sections (for single glazing) at the local timber merchants, but when I went to buy the timber for the bathroom window I discovered they are no longer available, thanks to the new Building Regs. I ended up buying a standard window with sealed units, but this was a BIG mistake - it looks totally out of keeping with all the other windows. Regs or not, it's coming out again as soon as I can machine the timber and make a replacement.
Peter
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Thanks all

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Sash window info on my site at http://www.owdman.co.uk/joinery Biggest problem is thin glazing bar with mouldings - for which you will not find a matching router cutter. I make my own spindle moulder cutters for perfect replica mouldings. You can get round the moulding prob by using a plain bevel instead of the moulding. This sounds unlikely but if the glazing bar is exactly the same dimension as original then from a distance the lack of moulding won't be noticed. e.g. a fine 14mm glazing bar with say 3mm flat between mouldings - retaining the 3mm between bevels looks very neat. Many windows were done without mouldings in this way but don't get noticed particularly.
cheers
Jacob
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snipped-for-privacy@jpbutler.demon.co.uk (jacob) wrote in message

Hi I havent tried it so I cant be sure, but it appears at first sight that it shouldnt be too hard to make various shapes of router cutting blade to fit a block. They would only be steel, not TCT, but should still do the job ok. How to do you carve a bit of steel to shape? angle grinder. Might sound crude, but if I can make good performance drill bits with nothing more than an angle grinder I would think its perfectly doable. A finer grinding wheel would be ideal for shaprneing it, but even there I've used the grinder and produced a sufficiently sharp edge to give a good result.
Regards, NT
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I'm no engineer but I think the prob with router cutters is that they need to be accurately balanced due to being used at high rpm in a small machine, so making them is a skilled precision machining operation. I guess you'd start by turning the profile on a lathe, then cutting out the throats for the cutters, then back off the cutter edges. Whereas spindle moulder cutters operate at lower revs in a big sturdy machine which can tolerate some imbalance (not too much or the bearings suffer). So I make a pair of matching cutters using angle grinder for roughing out and 6inch bench grinder with various wheels for finishing off . Paired for balance but it is not essential for both cutters to be cutting exactly, i.e. one can be set back slightly to make setting up easier. This sounds a bit rough and ready but infact it's possible to make absolutely perfect matches of mouldings - identical to the eye that is, because you are doing them by eye. They are astonishingly cheap compared to router cutters and also endlessly adaptable, re-usable, reshapeable etc.
cheers Jacob

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jacob wrote:

I totally agree. I have worked in a spindle moulding shop, and that is exactly how its done.

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I'm no engineer but I think the prob with router cutters is that they need to be accurately balanced due to being used at high rpm in a small machine, so making them is a skilled precision machining operation. I guess you'd start by turning the profile on a lathe, then cutting out the throats for the cutters, then back off the cutter edges. Whereas spindle moulder cutters operate at lower revs in a big sturdy machine which can tolerate some imbalance (not too much or the bearings suffer). So I make a pair of matching cutters using angle grinder for roughing out and 6inch bench grinder with various wheels for finishing off . Paired for balance but it is not essential for both cutters to be cutting exactly, i.e. one can be set back slightly to make setting up easier. This sounds a bit rough and ready but infact it's possible to make absolutely perfect matches of mouldings - identical to the eye that is, because you are doing them by eye. They are astonishingly cheap compared to router cutters and also endlessly adaptable, re-usable, reshapeable etc.
cheers Jacob

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Jacob,
Are you back into manufacturing then? I haven't got round to renovating my windows yet, but if you're back in business I might consider it again!
J.
--
John Rouse

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John No sorry not yet. Got bogged down in chapel conversion - wife had proper job when I started but lost it so had to slow down, but had lost workshop at Via Gellia Mill. Then had to sell house and move into caravan behind chapel, then moved into temporary polythene tent inside chapel to avoid worst of winter i.e. long dark evenings with nothing to do but watch telly and drink . Oh its a hard life to be sure but conversion now going ahead in reasonably sized fits and starts. Will have own workshop in chapel soon but 1st job is 10 huge chapel windows - 4ft x 12ft high with round heads. After that who knows? I don't.
cheers
Jacob

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