Radiator in Conservatory

I am gradually working my way through the house replacing a microbore
central heating system. The final stage will allow me to install a radiator
in the conservatory. It will be linked to one of the main radiators in the
lounge. Are there any pros and cons I should be aware of in undertaking this
or should I concentrate on the lounge and stick with the oil filled rad in
the conservatory?
Thanks
David - Milton Keynes
Reply to
David Klyne
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
AIUI, building regs require a conservatory radiator to be on a separate zone - with separate timing and temperature control - from the rest of the house. This is difficult to achieve if you just pipe it in parallel with a lounge rad. You could get close to the spirit - if not the letter - of the law by using a fan-blown jobby, which are good for conservatories anyway because they are much smaller than conventional rads with the same output, and don't take up too much valuable wall space. They give out very little heat when the fan's not running - so if you use a timer and thermostat to control the fan, you've *almost* got a separate zone.
Have you calculated the heat losses (which can be quite high in a conservatory!) in order to work out the required heating capacity for the radiator? You need to do that, and to make sure that the pipework (and the boiler!) can support this additional load.
Reply to
Roger Mills
Roger
Thanks for the reply. It did seem to be an opportunity whilst I was putting in replacement 15mm pipes to just spur another rad off into the conservatory. My main concern was the heat loss although to be honest I am not altogether sure how to calculate that. As it is I was thinking of replacing a single rad in the lounge with a double as it seems that when the rads were originally installed (28 years ago) there seemed to be a miscalculation of the heat require to maintain a decent temperature. Unless of course that is just the 8mm system becoming inefficient over the years.
David - Milton Keynes
Reply to
David Klyne
I have a similar setup - one 'spur' of the CH feeds the kitchen, conservatory and dining room.
One potential downside is that if the conservatory is very cold, your living room will take longer to warm up. Maybe turn down the lockshield valve on the conservatory rad to compensate.
I replaced a tiny double rad in the conservatory with a very tall, flat design similar to
formatting link
I'm very pleased with the result.
Reply to
PM
formatting link
and I'm very pleased with the result.
That rad has a heat output less than a one bar fire.. does your conservatory have glass in it?
Reply to
dennis
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
There was an old woman who swallowed a fly . . .
It seems to me that you really need to analyse what your actual problem *is* rather than going for arbritrary solutions which may or may not be appropriate.
The basic symptom seems to be that the lounge isn't warm enough. It *might* be that the rated output of the existing rad is insufficient to balance the heat losses - in which case a higher output rad would be needed. Equally, it might simply be that the existing rad isn't getting hot enough - due to poor pipework, or it could simply be that the system needs balancing to prevent other rads from hogging all the heat.
In your position, I would get hold of one of the heatloss calculation programs - from the likes of Barlo or Myson - calculate the heat losses of the room, establish the rated output of the existing rad, and see whether it's adeqaute, before doing anything drastic.
Reply to
Roger Mills
Correct Roger. Also the fan heater will need at least 15mm to it and not spurred off another rad.
Best go for a fan heater. There are high level models too. They can also have the fans running in summer to circulate air cooling the place. Fan heaters are ideal. Look at the Myson web site, they have a number of models.
Reply to
Doctor Drivel
formatting link
>
conservatory
That's not the actual rad, just a similar design, although I imagine the one I've got is similar output because it is around the same size. It takes up all the wall space in the conservatory. The conservatory itself is all glass except for UPVC box section roof panels and insulated UPVC lower panels arpund 18" high.
Reply to
PM
The message from "Roger Mills" contains these words:
And there might be a stratification problem (think in terms of fitting radiator shelves and for good measure reflective foil behind the radiator while you're at it) and it might be that the location of the radiators is poor
the list can go on and on.
Reply to
Appin
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Our 12' x 12' Victorian conservatory has a very similar construction to that. We don't use it that much in the winter, and have no CH in it. We *did* use it as a dining room over Christmas when we had people staying, and needed 3+ kW of fan heater to achieve a useable temperature in an acceptable time, and 2+ kW to maintain the temperature once we had achieved it. I haven't done any detailed heatloss calculation for it but if I were to extend the CH into it, I guess I'd be looking at around 3kW of heating capacity.
Reply to
Roger Mills

Site Timeline Threads

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.