Push Button Code Gate Locks

Hi all
Is there such a thing as a push button gate lock that's battery operated? If so any recommendations? I'm just thinking out loud about a side gate that we may want various people to access without doling out loads of keys.
TIA
Phil
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How about a card-swipe device as used on hotel doors?
Mary

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What about a mechanical pushbutton lock:-
http://www.screwfix.com/cats/A357940/Security/Push-Button-Locks/Mechanical-Push-Button
Steve
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TheScullster says...

If I were a passing burglar I'd think such a property must have lots worth nicking. So unless it is difficult for a burglar to simply hop over the gate or fence I'd be a bit dubious about such a lock.
--
David in Normandy

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It happens that TheScullster formulated :

None that I'm aware of which are battery operated. I have one on my garage's 'people entrance', fitted after suffering lots of frustration with keys going missing. If you have not come across them...
You set up a public code and a master code, both of which can be subsequently changed if required. The idea is master code can be kept secret and the public code given out to those who need access and changed as and when necessary. Enter either code correctly and a solenoid is powered up to release the catch on a Yale type lock. Code can be 6 or eight digits long, depending upon your needs.
I have not checked, but from memory it can run on anything between 12 to 24v - so running on a 12v gell cell should be possible.
Perhaps a 12v gell cell + a solar panel to keep it charged might work for you?
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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TheScullster wrote:

K.I.S.S. Combination padlock. Just give them the combination.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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From time to time, I amuse myself and others by demonstrating how woefully hopeless most cheap combination locks are.
The manufacturing tolerances are so poor, that all you need to do is to pull the thing gently in the 'open' direction. It won't open, but the load is being taken on one digit-ring only. You can determine which by twiddling them. 3 of the 4 will spin freely, and one has some resistance. Turn the resisting one, till you feel it 'lock' as the open slot in the ring is matched by the corresponding pin, and the lock will feel to open fractionally. It's now sitting on one of the remaining 3. Again, determine which one is resisting, and feel it 'click' too. Repeat till the lock opens.
I can generally open most cheap combination locks is under 2 minutes!
--
Ron


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says...

I met someone once who demonstrated that technique to me. It was amazing how quick and easy it is to open those locks. He could do them in less than a minute.
What the original poster hasn't said is who he intends to keep out. The level of security and associated cost and hassle factor for people getting in needs to match who he intends to keep out and be in keeping with the rest of his security.
If he just intends keeping out salesmen, nosey neighbours, kids or Jehovah's witnesses and the like that is one thing. If he intends to keep out burglars that is a different matter. The lock would be worthless if they can just climb over the gate or fence.
--
David in Normandy

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Ron Lowe wrote:

Is that while they are in situ e.g. a hasp & staple or free to handle?
I'll have to try that, the one on my garage is a Master Lock & wasn't cheap.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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Hi as has already been posted a mechanical lock may be your best solution but if you really need electrical locking you will have to get power to the gate. Most access systems are 12-24v powered and come in 2 parts. 1:- the reader 2:- the locking mechanism. The reader can be a keypad,swipe card,fob or even a radio receiver whilst the lock can be a heavy duty magnet,shoot bolt,mortise keep or Yale type keep. These are but the most common and hundreds of combinations are available. Try a search of BPT , URMET , BSTL , VIDEX websites and browse their Access Control pages for ideas prices etc.
HTH CJ
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