Pumps

Following the recent flooding, we are thinking of buying a pump so
that we can pump out our ground floor if it ever happens again. I
would also like it to be able to pump water from the river to run my
garden irrigation system, which has a series of small sprinklers.
Can anyone recommend a pump at a reasonable price to meet these need?
The catalogues have so many that I don't really know where to start.
Thanks
Jonathan
Reply to
Jonathan
Ring up a local pump place. We got a japanese made sump pump job for far less than the northern tool guff. I'd have thought some sort of sump pump is what you'd want for clearing your house out, and I'd be unsure at to whether it's allowed to nick water out of the river to water your garden. Much less, if you'd actually want to - a hell of a lot of rivers are full of nasty shite, and it can move at a very slow rate when it gets caught up in sediment, so even if your're miles from industry the water can still be polluted.
Reply to
Doki
Not what you want to hear or being sarcastic but I know if I was living in a flood area and knew it was going to be a reoccurance I'm afraid I would be selling up and moving to new pastures,nothing worse than having your home water damaged and possesions destroyed and having to go through the turmoil and wait to get it bac to normal living requirements and then find it'll repeat itself all over again which is apparent because of you're thinking that way.
Reply to
George
Thanks for this. As a riparian owner, you are actually allowed to abstract 20 cubic metres of water a day without a licence. Our river is pretty clear and I would want some sort of filter to keep my irrigation pipes clean.
Jonathan
Reply to
Jonathan
In article , "George" writes:
I think these are two quite different pumping requirements, and I doubt you'd cover both effectively with the same pump. Bear in mind that you might not have an electricity supply during a period of flooding, so you might want to consider a direct petrol driven pump, although a couple of people killed themselves from the fumes with such a pump in the recent flooding. Installation of suitable piping so the pump can run outside might be worth considering, but remember to allow for a certain water level outside.
You need a licence to abstract water from a river/pond/ditch etc. and I really doubt you would get one for this purpose (or at least, you wouldn't be allowed to when you really needed to).
The OP appears to be planning to prevent such damage, which is to be encouraged.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
As another poster has said - a licence isn't required for 'small' abstractions of up to 20 m3/day. It used to be that the license exemption was only for domestic or horticultural uses, but tjhis was simplified/liberalised a few years ago,
Andy
Reply to
Andy McKenzie
I have a pool at the bottom of my garden so decided to purchase and install a system to water my garden. In my case there is a significant rise to the main garden, also you need extra heading to operate a watering system. I bought my system from Toolsonline, it was not cheap but I was given excellent advice, and the system does exactly as asked. May I suggest you contact them by email?
Reply to
Broadback
I was thinking more stuff like heavy metals and other poisonous nastys. I'd want more than "The river's pretty clear" if I were going to be eating much of the fruit. OTOH chances are you'll feel no negative effects unless you manage to spend 40 years eating the stuff and then your remaining family eat your dead body...
Reply to
Doki
In message , Jonathan writes
Hmm... now would that be enough to run a heat pump? Also does riparian ownership allow you to put the same 20 cubic metres back?
75% of mine is treated sewage so nicely above ground water temperature:-)
regards
Reply to
Tim Lamb

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