Polyfilla

With deep holes to fill do people fill with several applications and
let the previous one dry out totally - or one "big" overfill and sand
down when thoroughly dry.
Also - I have a box I have had for at least three years - does it go
off (in the past its use by date sense) - I have noticed hairline
cracks in some of the filling I have done.
Reply to
mikesmith
Yes, do it in layers (the instructions on the pack will advise this, too). Otherwise if too much, the stuff will fall out of the hole before it sets, and/or it will take an age for it to dry out properly anyway.
Certainly ordinary plaster goes off... it sets too quickly, which is very likely to cause cracking. Polyfilla is chemically different but I expect may behave similarly... personally I wouldn't use a 3-year-old pack.
David
Reply to
Lobster
In article , mikesmith writes:
I tend to use one big underfill to within a 1-2mm of the surface which may well crack as it sets but that doesn't matter, and then a thin coat polished off with a wet trowel or scraper to match the surrounding surface. No sanding required.
I tend to use plaster rather than polyfilla. I always use plaster which has gone well past it's use-by date for filling, because it sets quickly. I do recall using what must have been very old polyfilla in the past, and don't recall any resulting issues.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
That is what I do too... any shrinkage cracks are welcome as they help to provide an extra key for the final finishing coat :-)
I have never had a problem with old polyfilla, even when it was stored in open packages for a few years.
Steve
Reply to
Steve
On 30 Sep,
I used it once to do around the reveal of a patio door. Never again! I'd much rather buy two bags, one of Browning and one of finish. Much easier to work with!
Reply to
<me9
A variety of Polyfilla whose name escapes me but was something about filling big holes.
I've never had any problem with one-coat plaster.
Reply to
John Stumbles
Certainly the flexible and fine surface ones are pretty bad. I imagine that they have some kind of plastic content because they are pretty much non sandable
Reply to
Andy Hall
Personally I do sand filler when needed. Don't you bother? Did you want to own up to any other bodging?
Reply to
Andy Hall
If you get the results you want using plaster, fine, but it doesn't mean it's a better fine filler. It isn't a filler at all, having none of the qualities of a filler.
Reply to
Stuart Noble
On 30 Sep,
Single coat plaster. It might have been easier with polyfilla. A browning layer followed by a skim would certainly have been even easier.
Reply to
<me9
On 30 Sep,
Gyproc joint finish I found the best fine surface filler. Is it still available, or is it superceded by 'Jointex' combined filler and finish?
Reply to
<me9
I'm not sure. The last one that I used was made by Lafarge, IIRC, or it might have been Knauf. At any rate, most manufacturers seem to have at least two jointing products - setting and drying types and/or a combination.
I prefer to use a slower product and to sand in between thin layers for most applications. It takes longer but produces a better result than loading in large amounts AFAICS.
Reply to
Andy Hall
If the job in hand doesn't require a fine filler, then don't use one. Doesn't change the fact that there is such a thing as "fine filler" which performs a function that plaster, or jointing compound, doesn't
Reply to
Stuart Noble

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