Plumbing advice needed please

I need to connect two pieces of iron pipe (ouside diameter 27mm, 1 and 1/16 inch) with something flexible, about 2 metres apart, to carry hot water. Lots of PVC piping available, but I can't find anything to mate the iron to the PVC. Any suggestions, please?
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Bob Martin wrote:

Probably a universal coupler.
http://www.bes.co.uk/product/168~PF~3618~3618~-Universal-Transition - Fittings-.html
Your flexible pipe will need to be MDPE as that is what the other end of the adaptor expects but it may be possible that a universal-unversal version exists?
--
Tim Watts

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Thank you, sounds just what I need.
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On Tuesday, September 25, 2012 12:20:37 PM UTC+1, Bob Martin wrote:

Are there screw threads on the ends of the iron pipes?
I'd just use whatever PEX is available, JG Speedfit or similar. How you'd attach it depends on the above.
Steel pipe isn't good for HW, the oxygen in the water causes corrosion problems. Galvanized was used. You probably know that.
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Probably is galvanised - 1936 central heating. No screw threads as I've had to cut out a blocked section. Thank you.
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On Tuesday, September 25, 2012 1:24:42 PM UTC+1, Bob Martin wrote:

Ah, if it's CH and not potable, then iron is used but you have to use inhibitors to stop corrosion. Use PEX, JG Speedfit or similar barrier pipe, designed for CH. Don't use MDPE.
Re joints, I'd expect Speedfit do a grip ring fitting, but I'd look further along the pipes for a screwed joint I could undo with a two stilsons to use a threaded adaptor.
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On Tuesday, September 25, 2012 1:41:24 PM UTC+1, Onetap wrote:

When you said hot water, I had assumed you meant potable hot water. Galvanized is used for that.
Black iron is used for CH.
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On 25/09/2012 13:24, Bob Martin wrote:

Is it feasible to remove more of the pipe, by tracing each piece back to a threaded joint. If you could then unscrew both pipes, you could replace the whole length with plastic - using threaded joints at each end.
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Cheers,
Roger
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Tried that but they are solid. Almost turned the header tank over.
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On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 07:40:36 +0000, Bob Martin wrote:

You just need a bigger hammer^H^H^H^Hpipe wrench :-)
I have one with 24" handle for that sort of job (Ali handle so it's not too much of a bastard to wield)
--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

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On 25/09/2012 12:20, Bob Martin wrote:

That is 3/4" nominal bore, so you are looking for 3/4" fittings. Iron and steel pipes are not measured by the OD. Nor are rigid PVC pipes, if the size is given in inches.

If the iron (or steel unless it is very old) pipe has threads on the ends, the easiest way would be to look for 3/4" BSP female threaded adaptors to your choice of flexible pipe. Alternatively, there are Primofit compression fittings for connecting steel pipes to HDPE.
http://www.georgfischer.co.uk/go/225C1CFFD60EB5F06BBF217FE12C853A
Colin Bignell
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Another good solution - thank you.
Three replies within the hour, and better advice than I've got from two days of phoning and googling. This newsgroup is priceless!
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Bob Martin wrote:

The god of knowledge shines on people who at least first try to JFGI ;->
--
Tim Watts

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I phoned 6 local plumbing centres yesterday, each passing me on to the next, until I got the Universal Transition Fittings at the local Drain Centre. However, I'm disturbed to be told by another poster that I shouldn't use MDPE for CH as, although I only needed 2 metres, I had to buy the minimum qty of 25m. And it isn't anywhere near as flexible as I'd hoped.
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Bob Martin wrote:

It gets more flexible if you run some hot water through it.
The only reason I can see why it might not be a good idea is it may be permeable to oxygen - ie let a little into the CH water causing corrosion.
--
Tim Watts

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On Wednesday, September 26, 2012 8:12:18 AM UTC+1, Bob Martin wrote:

Plumb Center, Drain Center, etc.. They're tossers, just looking to charge you the maximum possible, they don't care that you'll never go back. They don't want you back, they cater for trade accounts and negotiated discounts. If Screwfix don't stock it, try BES.co.uk.
Car radiator hoses are mostly permeable to oxygen, which is partly why you should change most anti-freeze every few years. There's no reason why you couldn't use copper, if you keep the inhibitors up, but it's not a pukka fix.
I've never run hot water through any PE, I suspect it will become too floppy to be useable.

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On 26/09/2012 09:09, Onetap wrote:

you the maximum possible, they don't care that you'll never go back. They don't want you back, they cater for trade accounts and negotiated discounts. If Screwfix don't stock it, try BES.co.uk.

should change most anti-freeze every few years. There's no reason why you couldn't use copper, if you keep the inhibitors up, but it's not a pukka fix.

I think the problem is not so much floppiness as *creep*, i.e. it will gradually stretch under the pressure and gravity loading until it fails. Is it a horizontal run? If so it will survive longer with frequent supports.
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It's possible to hire an electric pipe threading tool that exerts no torque on the existing pipe sytem. (There is an anchor that grips the pipe.) If you don't thread it,there is a strong possibility of leaks depending on the state of the outside of the pipe. (pitting/corrosion etc) with compression fittings.
However if it's that bad, you need to consider replacing all.of it.
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The cowboy option is to get some thick walled plastic pipe with an internal diameter matching the external diameter of the iron pipe, and then secure it with jubilee clips. Some of the large bore clear plastic pipe I have seen is very (vey) thick walled although I doubt it is approved for CH use.
Cheers
Dave R
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Think car radiator hose!
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