Planing a door

Carpet was fitted today and I need to trim about 15mil from the bottom of the bedroom doors, 3 of them. I bought a planer (Ryobi) battery powered on the recommendation of B&Q. He said a circular saw would shred the door as its hollow, also looks and feels like an office door. Shiny brown, highly polished.
Any tips on doing a good job please?
Thanks yet again Sam
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Samantha Booth coughed up some electrons that declared:

Watch for pins, nails and staples. Nicked the blade on my planer doing exactly what you are about to.
Also, work from both ends towards the middle. Classic schoolboy error with planing, but it was the first use of an electric for me. Somehow I thought it would be different. It wasn't - knocked a sliver of wood off the corner on the way out.
I would also mark it up in pencil too, both sides. 15mm is a lot off and what starts off as a nice 90 deg level base won't be after a few passes, unless you have something to work too.
I don't make many mistakes, because I usually worry a lot and plan well, but that job was a total cock up, mostly because I thought it would be easy.
Turned out OK, but I had to fiddle around correcting mistakes I need not have made.
You might actually be better off using a good hand saw for 15 mm, then a couple of light passes with the plane to tidy the edge.
Despite it being hollow, as mine were, there's usually a good bit of solid wood at the bottom IME.
HTH
Cheers
Tim
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Yes, take the planer back and get a (mains powered) circular saw.
Cordless planers are designed for taking off a light pass (1mm or less), and a little skill is required to produce good results. Trying to take lots of passes to take off 15mm would be tricky.
Yes the door is probably hollow, but you're trimming off part of the solid timbers that make up the outer edge of the door and to which the two thin "faces" of ply either side is attached.
The CC should come with a fence so you can set it to take off 15mm. Or you can clamp a batten on for the saw to follow. Set the depth to to just cut right through. Be careful to avoid any screws or nails. Be highly aware of the blade protruding through the bottom of the cut, and what it may come in contact with. A CC is a but fierce the first time you use one, but with very little practice it will produce consistently good results.
As always, practice with a new tool on some scrap first.
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What is a "CC"?
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My typo for CS - circular saw.
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On Fri, 06 Jun 2008 13:58:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote:

I'd be a bit leery about that: the circular saws I found in B&Q when I was last looking (3 or 4 years back I admit) were heavy 7" blade (185mm) monsters I'd probably be glad of if I were cutting up flooring chipboard but a bit of a liability for fine work. I used to have a nice 6" (150mm) Elu main-powered circ but that had packed up. If the OP can find a lightweight smaller-bladed saw (I think they tend to be described as trimsaws) then go for it, otherwise a half decent handsaw followed by a sand down (a small belt sander would be nice, and has other uses) would do a good job and not take long through softwood ticky-tacky doors.
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John Stumbles

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I am completely cack handed with an electric plane so I won't offer you any advice. But I do admire you for trying so many new things almost at the same time.
I don't think I have ever known one person to be on so many steep learning curves at once!
Good luck.
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wrote:

LOL Thanks Bruce. Thing is if I dont ask and do it myself I will never learn. I have done three of the bedrooms, gloss is perfect now, filled walls, plastered one, made my own T&G bath panel from white pvc t&g which really looks nice, fitted an outdoor socket a waterpoof one and also fitted a tap outside today. I have made mistakes, loads but with everyones help here I feel I can do it right. I have opened the planer now, I wonder if B&Q will have it back???
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Samantha Booth wrote:

They have a very good returns policy, so It shouldn't be a problem
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Dave wrote:

Especially as she said what she wanted it for, and they sold her the wrong tool.
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Paul Matthews
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"Not suitable for the intended purpose". Open and shut case.
Next ...!
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fitted
B&Q
Tell the you wish to swop it for a circular saw as you have had a few recommendations that the CS is best for cutting 15mm off the door rather than use a planer. ;-)
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Samantha Booth wrote:

I've got to support Bruce's comments - Isn't it surprising how your confidene grows after just a few successful jobs, and how a little thought and advice makes an awful lot achievable?
Since buying my first house I have also learnt a lot - I have replaced parts of floors, added ring mains (I do have an electrician as a brother to check what I have done) replaced heating pumps, done bits of plumbing, boxed in pipework, tiled a kitchen etc. At the moment in preparation for decorating I am repairing the corners of walls - the house is dry lined rather than palstered and the corners are "protected" with tape rather than a beading, so after 20 years of life, they are looking a little rough.
Go For It!
Paul.
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Paul Matthews
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Yes, use a circular saw. A handsaw will suffice, but will be hard work, take a lot longer, and gives a poor finish. Be aware that you may hit screws/nails when you cut through, so it could damage a saw tooth, or damage the planer if you use that.
If you do cut off the bottom rail of the door, then you will need to fit the cut off piece back in the door to give it some strength at the bottom, otherwise it will quickly start separating the 2 outer panels at the bottom. Alan.
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A.Lee wrote:

My TC blades are quite happy to take on nails and screws if I go slowly :-)

The bottom rail of the door is about 2 or more inches deep, at 15 mm of removal, there will be no danger of cutting it out.
Dave
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Unless it was trimmed to fit,
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On Fri, 06 Jun 2008 22:25:44 +0100, Dave wrote:

Not on any doors I've trimmed. I'd say the bottom timber was not much more than 1" sq orginally.
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Cheers
Dave.




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Dave Liquorice wrote:

That is my experience with cheap doors, though perhaps they had ALREADY been trimmed.
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Samantha Booth wrote:

Put a pencil line along both faces (front and back) of the door at the point you want to stop planing. Plane from door edge to centre from each side. This will prevent the plane from splitting the timber on the exit side of the cut. You might end up with a convex curve, but this is of no consequence as the plane can still bite in to remove it, by starting somewhere along the door away from it's edge. There will be a problem if you take too much off at the middle of the door (concave shape) as you can't put it back if you take too much off.
Ideally, the door should be held firmly and have the edge to be planed at about waist, or chest height, so a work mate vice might be of help. Be warned that an electric plane will throw wood chips out at 90 degrees from the direction of planing, unless it has a dust bag, so do this outside if there if no dust bag. And get some goggles, just in case.
Also, look at the end of the edge you are planing, just to make sure that it is square to the face of the door, and keep an eye on the pencil lines. I tend to wander off at an angle when I have a lot to trim off.
I've got to ask...
How thick is the carpet?
Dave
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Hi dave
Very thick pile, good foam underlay too. two are just snagging, one door needs between 1cm and 2 off. I dont want to damage the carpet by dragging the door all the time.
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