Patchy ceiling - overboard, lining paper, or ???

Just started stripping the anaglypta paper from walls and ceiling in the first room we're tackling. The stuff on the walls is coming off reasonably OK but underneath is some painted 1930/1940s paper (very thin) that is a bit of a pain, but it's coming off slowly. The problem is (predictably) the ceiling - the plaster seems to be reasonably OK but it's been painted and some of the paint is coming off with the paper, leaving a patchy surface. I'd prefer not to have to overboard if possible, but what are the alternatives? Thick lining paper, paint stripper, sanding ... anything else?
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Depends on the thickness of paint left adhering. At my last house stripping paper off the ceiling like you ended up with patches of bare plaster and p atches of paint. I scraped as much of the flaking edges until all that rema ined was sound paint. Painting it with Matt emulsion to the casual eye it a ppeared a uniform surface, if you looked carefully then you could see sligh t edging through the paint but you had to look hard and after all who stare s at ceilings.
In the lounge a portion of which was an old kitchen which as was common in the fifties had gloss painted walls when wall paper was removed some bad de pressions emerged as paint came away with the paper. In that instance I tur ned to my favourite filler namely drywall filler applying it with a float a nd giving a final light sanding left a perfect finish owing to the fillers ability to feather in nicely.
Richard
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On Friday, 17 November 2017 01:08:49 UTC, Tricky Dicky wrote:

ng paper off the ceiling like you ended up with patches of bare plaster and patches of paint. I scraped as much of the flaking edges until all that re mained was sound paint. Painting it with Matt emulsion to the casual eye it appeared a uniform surface, if you looked carefully then you could see sli ght edging through the paint but you had to look hard and after all who sta res at ceilings.

n the fifties had gloss painted walls when wall paper was removed some bad depressions emerged as paint came away with the paper. In that instance I t urned to my favourite filler namely drywall filler applying it with a float and giving a final light sanding left a perfect finish owing to the filler s ability to feather in nicely.

Lighting can really fix such situations. Well diffused uplighting is good, lighting from a shallow angle bad.
NT
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On 17/11/2017 01:08, Tricky Dicky wrote:

Thanks, you've given me hope ;-) Because of other distractions (not least the other ceiling I've asked about) it's going to take us a while to get the whole room stripped but I'll report back when I know how bad the problem is (or, perhaps, isn't!)
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On 16/11/2017 23:07, snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

Is the paint on the ceiling chalk like? If so it may be a soft distemper paint. I had one room where all the walls and ceiling where painted in a thick layer of this and it was a right PITA to remove with plenty of water, a scrapper and a final coat of an outdoor brick/dust stabilising solution to seal it.
I've had some success with normal THICK lining paper to hide minor imperfections but it will not hide anything major.
I've had some success in a small area with Erfurt wall rock lining http://www.erfurtmav.com/erfurt-mav-wallpaper-products/wallrock/product/433-wallrock-premium-200 Note that this is a heavier grade than available in many of the popular sheds and I needed it to hide something that couldn't be classed as minor surface imperfections. With this product you can paste the wall or ceiling with makes putting it up easier. (A pasted length of normal thick lining paper is heavy, especially if you are trying to put it up over your head.
Possible OT, On many DIY and makeover type TV programs they always seem to be stripping the wall paper dry and making very hard work of it.
I always use copious amounts of water when stripping wallpaper. First, with vinyl wall-covering just peal off the top layer in one go, with painted wood-chip or paper a quick light sanding of the surface (electric sander with a coarse grit paper) or a run over with a pricking tool. Secondly a light spray over with water with a bit of washing up detergent using a garden sprayer. Thirdly leave for at least 10 minutes. Depending on the porosity if the surface continually repeat stages 2 and 3. The longer you can leave the paper damp before stripping the better BUT the water has to start penetrating below the paint, perhaps in just little pin prick places to start with - hence using washing up detergent to break the surface tension of the water. I also have steam plate for the stubborn stuff but as I progress around a room I will continually repeat stages 2 and 3 so the remaining surfaces still remain damp.
With some surfaces/papers it can still be hard work and it will leave a wet soggy mess on the floor so best not to try this with the carpets still in place.
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On 17/11/2017 08:02, alan_m wrote:

No, I think it was once gloss and probably nicotine-stained.

That looks like the answer - thanks!

I've done plenty of wallpapering but never a ceiling - pasting the ceiling sounds a lot easier than pasting the paper. I may do the prep and then get someone in for the lining depending on whether I feel lucky and how much my back aches.

I would normally use a mix of spray and steam but SWMBO is doing the walls her way (slowly!) and tends to "resist instruction" ... I just hope we're alive long enough for her to finish the room :-)

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