OT:NHS fuckwittery.

Had to visit a friend in the new Queen Elizabeth hospital in Brum over the weekend. The building is absolutely colossal - I vague recall it was one of the biggest building projects in the country.
Sitting in the ward, I noticed that the curtain that runs round the bed was fouled by the door to the ward - if you wanted to pull the curtain round, you needed to close the door a bit (hoping that no one would open it and tear the curtain. They should have either moved the curtain rail by 2", or made the door 2" smaller.
Apparently, according to the nurse all wards are like this.
Additionally, they had a big wall clock in the ward. Of course, it was mounted above the door to give everyone a clear view ? No, it was mounted *next* to the door. So one half of the ward couldn't see it if they had their curtains round.
Reminded me of another visit to a hospital a few years ago. They had just refurbished it to the tune of millions, and some fuckwit decided the *only* entrance into the hospital was by revolving door - even for wheelchairs.
It's when you realise we are paying for this, you start crying :(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it were left to the tories you'd be in a late 1940's prefab with a leaky roof, freezing cold in winter and baked in summer. You might get a lukewarm cup of tea if you were lucky as there would be no chance of any drugs or treatment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2013 11:24, The Other Mike wrote: ...

One thing that Maggie did to benefit suppliers was insist that government bodies, like the NHS, pay quickly. It greatly improved our cash flow when that happened.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jethro_uk wrote:

A friend of mine had severe ambulatory problems, and he needed to visit his local hospital fairly frequently. The outpatients desk was at the far end of what he said was a 200-yard long corridor, and the consulting room he needed to visit was right by the entrance...
He occasionally needed to visit the National Orthopaedic Hospital in Bolsover Street, West London, which has a massive *three* blue-badge parking spaces in a borough which he claimed is the only place in Europe not to support the scheme. One visit cost him £100 in parking fines.
--
Terry Fields


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5 Aug 2013 10:41:31 GMT, Terry Fields wrote:

Hexham General orthapedics is at the far end of the atrium to the main entrance. There is a car park at that end but it's a floor lower than the atrium. There are stairs at that end, the lifts however are in the middle...
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Isn't this illegal? Revolving doors, I thought, *must* be flanked by outward-opening ordinary doors.
--
Tim

"That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 05 Aug 2013 12:02:44 +0100, Tim Streater wrote:

I don't know. I just remember being behind a very elderly couple who were to terrified to go in. I went ahead and triggered the safety "go slow" and helped them through. I was so incensed that I went to the reception desk and complained to whoever looked in charge. She honestly couldn't see the problem as "no one has every complained before". I got a frosty look when I said that's probably because they can't get in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, and I find them much quicker than any revolving door so I look out for them. But very few people seem to use them. I suspect they just don't see them (not saying that about Jethro).
--
Mike Barnes

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2013 12:02, Tim Streater wrote:

Only if they are designated as emergency exits.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would be strange to have a main entrance which wasn't also an emergency exit.
--
*What do little birdies see when they get knocked unconscious? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2013 14:29, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That rather depends upon whether outside the main entrance is a suitable place to have a large crowd of confused people milling about. It probably isn't if it is on a busy main road or is the route the emergency vehicles need to use. Better instead to lead people along a fire protected route that deposits them somewhere that they will be safe and not get in anybody's way.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fine perhaps in the village hall, but most hospitals are rather large to have just the one fire exit. And the important thing is to have the shortest possible route to the fire exit - not to worry about what's happening outside.
--
*Time is what keeps everything from happening at once.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2013 18:54, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I didn't suggest they should have, just that the main entrance might not be the best choice for one of them.

The idea is to get people to a place of safety and that may not be outside the main entrance. While it is important to get people through a fire exit quickly, there is nothing to stop that exit from leading people into a protected route, which takes them some way further before they get outside. Indeed, my local hospital has just such a protected route along a fairly long corridor that has obviously been designed to get wheelchairs out to the car park, across a significant change of level, but it also serves as access to offices.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2013 13:34, Nightjar wrote:

Does that still apply to the type of revolving door where pushing either side stops the drive motor and folds back the door leaving it wide open?
SteveW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2013 18:55, SteveW wrote:

The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 Article 14(e) states 'sliding or revolving doors must not be used for exits specifically intended as emergency exits'. I can't find any exemptions from that.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. If the door jams, no exit. So doesn't meet fire regs.
--
*Women like silent men; they think they're listening.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There was a night-club fire in the 20s in New York (IIRC) where they had 400 deaths or so because he revolving doors jammed.
--
Tim

"That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 05 Aug 2013 09:54:19 GMT, Jethro_uk wrote:

Was there enough space above the door to take a large clock? Could well be some poncy designers idea for a large clock but hadn't looked at the plans to see if their clock would actually fit.
There is a *small* H&S side as well in access to the clock to reset it twice a year or change the battery. Some one needs to be up steps in a doorway, possibly behind closed doors. Also unless the fixing is done well both into the wall and fixing to clock the slamming vibration could cause it fall off as someone is passing through.
So their you have the reasons, a poncy designer, H&S and a builder who can't put a fixing into a wall securely.

All the large revolving doors I've seen have had double door fire exits either side of them. Revolving doors don't let people out fast enough. Some revolvers don't have fixed paddles though they can be released to create a straight through path.

Hum until 2004 Hexham General was a ramshackle collection of prefabs built as emergency military hospital during WWII...
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They have to find savings somewhere, those boilers that keep the hospital temperature at 6,000 degrees aren't cheap to run. Neither are the nurses they employ to close a window within 4 seconds of you opening it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 05 Aug 2013 13:25:40 +0100, Mentalguy2k8 wrote:

LOL.
On the way to the ward I stopped at main reception first. The lady immediately looked at her screen and directed me to the correct unit. At the unit, I asked again, and got a sea of blank looks. The nurse tried to tell me they had no record of my friend, but accepted that the front desk wasn't mistaken. I was pointed to the next nurses station, who pointed me to the one after that which it transpired was the one I needed. Luckily, they had a whiteboard behind them with all 12 patient names for clarity. Clearly, in the NHS, "data protection" is something other people do.
3 Nurses stations, each staffed with 3 nurses, plus any number of auxiliary staff for 40 patients.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.