OT How to live forever

http://www.ancientpurity.com /
WTF is the Silver Generator?
--
Adam



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/2012 16:20, ARW wrote:

Do people actually believe all this bollox?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, December 22, 2012 4:35:21 PM UTC, The Medway Handyman wrote:

They must do. Same people as the Russ Andrews hifi guff ? Maybe the colloidal silver generator would weave you some Silver Power Kords ?
The pinhole glasses idea actually is interesting (not just available on this site). Info here: http://www.seeing.org/visiontd/articles/pinholes.html
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/12 16:35, The Medway Handyman wrote:

I think this say a lot :-
Disclaimer : The products and the claims made about specific products on or through this site are not approved to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. Prices and promotions are subject to change without notice.
Andy C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes saw that, I was wondering whether supernatural drinks and liquids make you into a ghost? also Ozone is quite a toxic substance, not to be breathed in too much!
Brian
--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"Andy Cap" < snipped-for-privacy@trashmail.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/2012 16:35, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Can't see why people would invest in setting up such sites unless others did at least buy things from them. Whether that really is to believe in them is another matter. Desperation is a very strong driver of people's actions. If people are ill and current day medicine is failing to help, they try things like this rather than give up and not try anything.
One of the older disorders that had largely disappeared was argyria - when skin goes blue/bluish grey due to excess intake of silver. But that has made a return with people using lots of silver as their own "antibiotic". This generator claims to convert a simple rod of silver into nano-particles which have special attributes.
Those who get argyria seem to say "that's the price of curing myself".
Living with someone who has chronic painful disorders I can see why people fall for these things. That our medical systems leave so many people effectively unhelped and unable to get any help is something I had not realised was so prevalent. If you have a disorder for which there is not an obvious specialist, what does your GP do? The answer is that at best they send you round several non-obvious specialists and try to assist with symptomatic relief. At worst, they dismiss your problems, suggest it is all in your head, put you on anti-depressants, and refuse any referrals.
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/2012 16:48, polygonum wrote:

This is one of the dichotomies of a number of "alternative" treatments - many are valueless in clinical terms, and yet they do achieve real benefits for some patients in situations where conventional medicine seems to fail them. Perhaps it really comes down to having someone take a genuine interest in your problem, and not treating you as a crank, and then secondly, the patient actually believing that the treatment will have a positive benefit. The placebo effect is real and demonstrable.
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/12/2012 00:13, John Rumm wrote:

The pattern I so often see (in the particular things with which I am familiar), is this. People try a new treatment and sometimes seem to get some benefit, say how wonderful they are feeling a bit better. After a while they stop mentioning it. Later still, they are asked how it is going and "admit" that they have given it up either because it was not working, the side-effects were too much, or whatever else.
Unfortunately, standard medicine has a number of products which cannot simply be given up and require a very long, slow process of tapering off them in order not to cause big problems.
Fortunately, there is a considerable range of things which could be classed as safe (or fairly safe) to try out for oneself and which might have positive effects. Provided they are used with sufficient research, care and thought, I'd include vitamin B12, apple cider vinegar, selenium, dietary exclusions, vitamin D. At the same time, some things often regarded as fairly innocuous can be quite dangerous - iron-based supplements (unless you have demonstrable iron-deficiency), folates (unless you have demonstrable B12 sufficiency).
Some of these allow many cycles of trying to DIY fix yourself - with little real danger. (Perhaps the biggest issue is missing out on timely diagnoses and treatments rather than the things themselves.) And, inasmuch as placebo works when DIY, then that effect too.
And some of these things DO work.
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/12/2012 08:10, polygonum wrote:

Much like many of the Amazon reviews. The 5 star reviews are from the people who received the product the day before and still believe the manufactures claims. The 1 star reviews are from people who have been using the product for a few weeks.
--
mailto:newsadmac(dot}myzencouk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/12/2012 11:48, alan wrote:

Amazing how many Amazon reviews do indeed say things like "Arrived. Box looks bigger/smaller than expected. Brilliant product. Have not yet opened or used it."
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23/12/2012 12:35, polygonum wrote:

People confusing Amazon reviews with ebay feedback...
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2012 16:35:21 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:

ICBA to visit the site but silver *is* an antibiotic.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_uses_of_silver http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_sulfadiazine
I guess this lot are hanging far too much on the wrong hook on the basis that the Great Unwashed with too much money are also too thick to do basic backround research.
--
Cheers
Dave.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2012 16:20:45 -0000, "ARW"


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7up1MzwxhI

--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Graham. wrote:

Better than David Essex
--
Adam



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/2012 16:50, harry wrote:

That link reminded me:
"In the United States, the FDA prohibits the sale of over-the-counter silver-containing drugs because they have not been shown to be safe and effective."
A generator of silver nano-particles/colloids gets round that rather neatly.
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A few years back there was some talk of using silver in the NHS. for various things. One of the ideas was silver plated light switches to kill bugs & so reduce cross infection.
Dunno what came of it all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A few years back there was some talk of using silver in the NHS. for various things. One of the ideas was silver plated light switches to kill bugs & so reduce cross infection.
Dunno what came of it all.
The vampires put a stop to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2012 09:28:04 -0800 (PST), harry wrote:

Context? Colloidal silver certainly hasn't been proven to have any real medical benefits but other silver compounds have and are used.

Copper or brass is cheaper...
Maybe they ought to install these:
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/CEXVT1.html
But you'd want them as bare metal, before the lacquer has been applied... Then I expect people would complain about the patina that would develope, or the shock risk (the fact that everywhere these days has CPC wouldn't be relevant). But it is seemingly silly simple things like using brass light switches that could reduce cross infection rates. If a bug lasts 6 hrs on a plastic switch and only 3 on a brass one...
--
Cheers
Dave.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you missing the point that silver is an antibiotic whose efficacy was known in roman times, even if they didn't usually have light switches
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.