OT: Catastrophic breeding season for Adelie penguins in Antarctica

All but two chicks starved to death, out of many thousands. Dwindling fish stocks? Another disastrous consequence of global warming? No, too much ice! http://tinyurl.com/ybkfkjfb
So much for shrinking ice sheets down there. But that was something of a fabrication anyway, apparently. http://tinyurl.com/lzoa7ey
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Chris

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On 14/10/2017 08:17, Chris Hogg wrote:

Don't confuse them with facts, their mind is made up.
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On 14/10/2017 09:40, newshound wrote:

Quite. As this article states it is still
"a reminder of the horrifying effects of the changing climate."
As is absolutely every freak of nature.
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On 14/10/17 09:50, Chris B wrote:

Acually a hard winter is weather, not climate.
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On 14/10/2017 09:50, Chris B wrote:

Forgive me asking a stupid question, but: Suppose lots of ice is falling off the Antarctic shelf because of global warming. Where does that go? It's not going to melt immediate, is it? So, maybe that creates large ice sheets.
I don't know anything about all this. But I am just pointing out that formation of large ice sheets doesn't mean that there's no global warming.
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wrote:

Into the sea where it floats off and eventually melts.

Icebergs is what they are then called, even if the lump of ice is bigger than Belgium. Note that such ice falling into the sea does not alter the sea level, because that part of the ice shelf off which it fell or cracked off is already floating.
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On 14/10/17 10:54, GB wrote:

Well there is a cycle. Ice forms , spreads out over the seas where its melted by warmer waters or smashed up by weather.
More sea ice might mean more snowfall, or colder waters or both.
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On 14/10/2017 12:11, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Colder waters - perhaps because more ice has split off the Antarctic shelf and melted in the sea, for example?
I'm just pointing out that it isn't as simple as: More ice => No global warming.

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On 14/10/17 12:26, GB wrote:

No indeed. Except that as far as the arctic was concerned it was always trumpeted as less ice=> more global warming.

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On 14/10/2017 13:12, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I think the idea was less ice on the land, due to global warming, leads to a rise in sea levels.
NASA shows a rise of 85mm in the last 20-odd years, and around 250mm over the last 150 years, or so. That's not significant if you live half-way up a mountain, but more worrying if you live only a few feet above sea level.
Something has caused that sea level rise, and I assume it's generally accepted to be global warming. What's less generally accepted is the cause of the global warming.
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On 14/10/2017 14:37, GB wrote:

In some instances, like the east coast of America, what is described as sea level rising is actual land sinking.
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Due to the ever increasing load of bullshit piling up there due to Trump.
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F wrote:

I remember there used to be a lot of news coverage about coastal erosion darf sarf, and it was always suggested that it was due to rising sea levels. But I had a girlfriend at the time who was studying geology, and she reckoned the erosion was to be expected because since the ice under which Scotland had been so deeply buried had melted, the south really was sinking, to sort of balance it all out.
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wrote:

The South East *is* sinking, I don't know at what rate. It may be that the whole land mass is tilting due to the Scottish ice having gone. That is, Scotland is rising while SE sinks. Scandy is also rising for the same reason.
However: we are in an interglacial, so expect the ice back sometime in the next 5 - 50k years.
The erosion on the coast of East Anglia is not helped by the fact that the coast there is made of mud (silt deposited back when the mouth of the Rhine was much further north.
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wrote:

She's right. See http://tinyurl.com/yb9raoge , taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-glacial_rebound
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On 16/10/17 16:28, Dan S. MacAbre wrote:

True of SW england and a litle bit SE
'Isostatic rebound'
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-glacial_rebound
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On 16/10/17 16:28, Dan S. MacAbre wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-glacial_rebound#/media/File:Post-glacial_rebound_in_British_Isles.PNG
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On Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:32:16 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Sea levels have been yo-yoing up and down for millennia. During ice ages, vast amounts of ice are locked up and sea levels are low. There was a time, around Neolithic times, when the English Channel was a broad valley, with a big river flowing westward and draining a large part of western Europe. Then the ice sheets melted and it flooded to a depth of about 300ft, as it is now.
In Cornwall, several wave-cut platforms have been identified, at 1000, 430, ~60 and ~20ft, corresponding to stand-stills in the relative sea/land levels over the last couple of million years or so. Most of Cornwall, apart from the high moors, is at the 430ft platform, meaning the sea level was at one time some 430ft higher than it is now.
But since Roman times, the Isles of Scilly have been sinking (or the sea rising) and quite quickly, with flooded man-made stone field walls running down out into the sea. At one time they were a single island, not the collection of islands as there is now.
But I'm never quite sure how geologists distinguish sea level rise from sinking land, as both can occur simultaneously.
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On 16/10/17 21:04, Chris Hogg wrote:

satellites are handy.
show the sea isn't rising at the moment...what?
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/10/16/inconvenient-nasa-shows-global-sea-level-pausing-instead-of-rising/
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On Mon, 16 Oct 2017 21:46:51 +0100, Tjoepstil

Hmm...a couple of days ago I looked at the NASA site referred to by Watts and as well as the satellite data it had a second graph showing the data from tidal gauge records from something like 1880 up to 1995, in the space underneath the MISSIONS heading, http://tinyurl.com/yaxv53dh . I thought it was a pity they didn't combine the two graphs to show the acceleration in the last couple of decades, if such there be. I don't know why they didn't, or indeed why they've just now decided to remove the tide gauge graph. Perhaps it was prompted by Watts' interest. One can't help being suspicious of these sorts of actions, especially as there are so many accusations of tampering with the raw data when it comes to AGW.
The graph on the Wiki site http://tinyurl.com/ycckvsfp from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_level does combine the two sets of data, and doesn't appear to show any significant change in gradient between tide gauges and satellite measurements, although it's not as up-to-date as the NASA data.
But I don't think Watts is justified in getting too excited about the fact that the sea level doesn't appear to have changed in the last eighteen months - it's to short a time period to make any firm conclusion, especially when one sees the 'noise' on the previous data; it even dipped around 2011.
There is interesting discussion below Watts' article.
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