Normally won't buy electronic consumer stuff from Aldi

but I decided to buy two of their Freeview boxes on offer this morning.
So I buys two and brings em home only to find the they won't coe out of
stand-by after a fiddle still no joy so I decides that they be faulty,taes
em back for a replacement and brings the other two home.
Same problem they won't come out of stand-by after another fiddle it would
seem you have to press the OK button and then press stand-by lol now then
the problem here is if you are in the middle of a function and want to just
shove it in stand-by mode you have to remember what the last function you
done and then press OK and press stand-by.
pffft fuck that they're are going back tomorrow.
Sheeesh! me remebers again not to buy electronic shite from Aldi.
Reply to
George
On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 14:07:48 GMT, "George" wrote:
And what exactly were you expecting for £18.99 ?
Reply to
HelpMe
faulty,taes
A freeview box that when you pressed the stand-by button it went into ON mode and when you pressed it again it went into OFF mode.
Instead I got OK then stand-by ON and OK stand-by OFF. lol :-P
Anyway I'll go to Argos and buy two for £14 each. ;-)
Reply to
George
Dunno, there's a lot around that price and paying more doesn't necessarily guarantee any more logical or intuitive behaviour, or for that matter any better build quality nowadays.
A fancier name on the stick on badge such as Quad or Warfedale, it's safe to reckon you pay more for that, the manufacturer will have had to buy it or pay to use it.
The Great British Public wanted cheap.
They got cheap.
DG
Reply to
Derek Geldard
In message , Derek Geldard wrote
Wharfedale is just a brand name owned by IAG that is put on items built in their Shenzhen factory. The group also brands Mission, Quad and Audiolab products.
Reply to
Alan
Better yet, don't buy anything from Aldi.
The cost of two wasted trips, the fuel to get there (twice) and the time.
Try asking them for reimbursement for the cost of all of that in addition to the refund of the goods so that we can find out just how bad their customer service really is.
Reply to
Andy Hall
I honestly can't make head or tail of what you've actually said. Did you actually bother to read the instructions or do the typical bloke thing of thinking you know best?
Aldi electronic stuff is no worse than most. I've got a Nokia digital receiver here which is a pile of pants - takes ages to respond to remote commands and then locks up every other day. Seems we have to get used to modern technology being full of bugs. A compromise I suppose for the fact that we're paying a fraction of the prices 20 years ago.
Reply to
daddyfreddy
Aldi's customer service is actually very good. I'd like to know which store would ever pay for your fuel costs.
Reply to
daddyfreddy
"Andy Hall" wrote in message
Nah! some of their tools are o for the price.
MrHall I'm not lazy ie sometimes I do use my legs for excercise, as Aldi is only a couple of hundred yards away from my home.
They don't argue about refunding the money back on the purchased goods.
Reply to
George
wrote in message
quite simple really.
A stand-by button is for the purpose of switching an item on&off. This one you have press a button marked 'OK' before pressing stand-by button,rather defeats the object of stand-by don't you think?
Reply to
George
Most modern receivers don't rely on just pressing the stand by button to turn it on. It's normally done by pressing one of the channel buttons. Try that instead. To turn off, the standby button should work by itself.
Reply to
daddyfreddy
wrote in message
Nah! I'll take it back instead.
ps that doesn't work neither as its what I try anyway, hence the word 'fiddle' in my original post.
Reply to
George
Not if they don't offer reimbursement for the additional cost of returning goods that are not fit for purpose.
From the top of my head, the following, in the last few years:
Marks & Spencer. I telephoned a store to check whether they had a specific style and size of shirt in stock. They confirmed that they had. I arrived there and they hadn't. Result was refund of fuel costs in cash with no purchase made.
B&Q. Second return of a Scorpion saw. Refund of fuel costs plus voucher for the store
Virgin Megastore. Classical work consisting of two CDs purchased. The package contained two of the no. 1 CD rather than one of each. Fuel costs refunded, CD replaced, voucher for two additional CDs.
John Lewis. Ceiling fan purchased. Same item found at local store for lower price. Difference refunded, fuel cost, voucher for the store and another for lunch in store restaurant.
Safeway (before acquisition by Morrisons). Defective food product. Product refunded. Fuel refunded. Reimbursement for Sunday lunch at local restaurant. Their alternative would have been a discussion with Trading Standards and an almost certain prosecution.
Marks and Spencer. Unable to meet delivery commitment. Free delivery and substantial discount.
These are among the many reasons why I won't buy from places like Aldi, Lidl, Netto, Makro,....
Reply to
Andy Hall
"For the price" being the operative phrase.
How far away are the proper shops?
How about for the time taken and th inconvenience? I thought not.
Reply to
Andy Hall
"Andy Hall" wrote in message
And all said stores have marked your cards as an INVALID customer ie don't serve this guy anymore. :-) MrHall most people would be too embarassed tomake a scene in public. I bet the wife hates going shopping with you?
Reply to
George
In message , Andy Hall wrote
The other stores can afford to give you back more of your money because you purchased at twice the price in the first place.
Reply to
Alan
ASDA Freeview box works just fine. If it doesn't within 12 months, I get a refund. Then I might press for a free pork pie
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Nope. I've purchased from all of them both before and after these events.
There is no need to make a scene. One can be quietly assertive with the store manager. That is the simple route to a satisfactory outcome.
It is exactly because people are willing to accept poor service without asking for recompense that service doesn't improve.
This is one of the worst aspects of British culture and mindset. For some reason, some supplers seem to think that providing good service is beneath them (perhaps it's a residue from generations of domestic service) and that not doing what you say that you will do is acceptable.
The assumption is that they will get away with it because British people culturally won't complain.
It isn't acceptable.
In many other countries, these cultural hangups don't exist to anything like the same degree. For example, in the Nordic countries, providing good service is considered to be doing one's job properly and professionally and it is not demeaning. By and large this results in a lack of a need to complain about poor service.
Charging a low price isn't an excuse either, unless one specifically states that good service is excluded. Of course that could be seen as a way of trying to wriggle out of statutory commitments so is seldom used.
I have a very simple attitude to service associated with the buying and selling of goods and services. State clearly what you are going to do and then meet or exceed it. Price the goods or services to achieve that. Expect that if you fall short of the commitment that you will have to adjust the price that the customer pays overall to address the shortfall. If that involves paying for his out of pocket expenses then so be it.
This way if the service falls short, there will be attention to making it better in the future, and if it exceeds expectation, one gets repeat business and recommendation. That is a very inexpensive way of retaining customers and developing new business.
Contrast this with the approach of mainly meeting commitments and frequently falling short. Some people won't bother to return the goods but won't purchase from the supplier in future. Others will return the goods for refund and expect nothing more but continue to shop in the store. They are doing themselves, the supplier and other customers a disservice.
Reply to
Andy Hall
Incorrect.
However, what is the point in going through the exercise of buying some dodgy item, only to discover that it is not fit for purpose and wasting the time and fuel on two trips?
'It?s unwise to pay too much. But it?s worse to pay too little.
When you pay too much, you lose a little money, that is all.
When you pay too little you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.
The common law of business balances prohibits paying a little and getting a lot. It can?t be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder it is well to add something for the risk you run.
And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better.
There is hardly anything in the world that someone can?t make a little worse and sell a little cheaper?and people who consider price alone are this man?s lawful prey.'
John Ruskin (1819-1900)
I somehow doubt that John Ruskin shopped in Aldi either.
Reply to
Andy Hall

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