Noise from cooling fan

The hot weather has made me look for a cooling fan. I thought a pedestal fan would be quieter than a tower fan but this site says the opposite:
"Noise can also be a factor. In this category, tower fans win hands down." http://www.airreflect.com/tower-pedestal-or-table/
Is he right?
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I think it can depend on makes and models.
For the least amount of noise, intrusion and the best effect in use I think the ceiling fans take a lot of beating. We have one in the lounge and one in our bedroom and it can feel very oppressive if we go somewhere where there isn't such a thing.
For low noise and a good (noticeable) air flow you need a big fan turning slowly or the fan somewhere else and ducting taking the air where you want it.
If you are using a conventional floor / table mounted fan I would tend to try to get air circulating within a (smaller / square) room and so position the fan to blow along one wall, rather than have it oscillating around the middle.
OOI we have a split unit aircon in the middle bedroom and have experimented with screening off the landing from the rest of the house (polythene sheet on a batten) and leaving all 3 bedroom doors ajar and on the hottest of nights waking up to a chilly 20 degrees. The realisation of how warm it may have been otherwise was when you walked though the 'curtain' into the heat of the rest of the house! ;-(
Maybe with all this global warming we (in the UK) might start to consider the routine fitment of housewide coverage of aircon (as we do heating) and then at least there would be some direct justification for also having solar panels. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 20/07/2016 08:38, T i m wrote:

100% agreed.
We have four. We might be about to buy another.
On higher speeds, even they are noisier than I would like, but at low speed they are far more acceptable than any other sort I have used.
--
Rod

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wrote:

And for me I'd go as far as to say the gentle sound of the slow speed actually helps me with my Tinnitus. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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polygonum wrote:

I use big 110V US ceiling fans.\, the slower speeds makes them quieter and they are much cheaper, even when the PUS costs are included.
Aircon units are useful, but mainly for cheap heating in winter.
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On Wed, 20 Jul 2016 08:38:25 +0100, T i m wrote:

That's what is universally used in the hotter parts of the world where aircon is to expensive to buy or run. A big slow ceiling fan just enough to get the air slowly moving makes a huge difference to the comfort of a room and is barel audible.
The standard 8' ceiling height of a UK house means that a ceiling fan may well have to rather to close to the ceiling but it'll still be better than the draft from a convential relatively high speed desk/pedistal fan.
Or just have a house with high thermal mass, was well above 25 C outside yesterday, the didn't get much above 20 C.
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On Wed, 20 Jul 2016 13:54:59 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"

True. You often see them in films etc. ;-)

Yup. Even going round mums with her large rooms it still feels 'stifling' (to us) unless you open a window or dig a fan out.

the way. I think the upstairs ceiling is a bit lower and the fan is over the bed so you do need to remember it's on when ... well ... <blush>. ;-)

Does that also work (as well) in the winter Dave? We are EOT and the flank wall is exposed to the sun for the second half of the day. That means if there is any sun about it acts a bit like a large storage rad, keeping the house warm in the evenings. Not sure how much hotter it makes the house in the summer but at least you can easily let that heat *out*. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On Wednesday, 20 July 2016 19:44:37 UTC+1, T i m wrote:

What's embarrassing about changing the duvet cover?
Owain
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On Wed, 20 Jul 2016 12:42:31 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Yes, that as well! ;-)
Cheers, T i m
p.s. A mate had a bit of bad luck with one particular girlfriend. First she wrapped his car round a tree, breaking his left arm in several places, then after that healed, broke his nose with a headbut when they were at it. ;-)
Straight after the first event she was embarrassed at the Police Station when the policeman was going though the stuff recovered from the car and asked if the 'toy' was hers (it was) and later when it went off in her bag when she was back at his (very straight-laced / religious) parents house, all being somber because of what happened. ;-)
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On Wed, 20 Jul 2016 19:44:36 +0100, T i m wrote:

Probably not as noticeable in the winter as the heating will be on so one expects to come in from -5 C or lower and be warm. In summer with it 25+ C outside coming in is pleasantly cools.
What the approximately 20 tonnes of stone through the middle of the house does do is slow down any changes in internal temperature. What you don't do is ever turn the heating off, always have it on a thermostat. 'Cause if that 20 tonnes cools down by a few degrees because you went way for a few days and turned the heating off it takes a long time (days) for the place to become comfortable again. DAMHIKT...
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On 08:38 20 Jul 2016, T i m wrote:

I hadn't thought of using a ceiling fan but it seems like a good idea especially its slow moving quieter operation.
I will also get a floor fan but am not sure which type tends to be quietest. I already have a good pedestal fan which is quiet and a cheap Tesco tower fan which is noisy. But the article I quoted suggests tower fans should be quieter so I'm not sure what to get and I can't manage to hear the thing first.
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Then it might be a good idea to get it from Aldi etc that allows you to return anything you don’t like when you try it.
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On 20/07/16 14:33, pamela wrote:

If you can afford it, get a DC ceiling fan. They are silent in operation. I've yet to find an AC ceiling fan which doesn't hum like mad - and it seems worse at the slowest speed (where the noise of the blades moving air is least) because it becomes so obvious. And if they have lights, the glass shades just add to the noise as it seems they vibrate at just the right frequency to add to the noise.
More info here: https://www.henleyfan.com/blog/dc-vs-ac-ceiling-fans/
--

Jeff

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On 19:30 20 Jul 2016, Jeff Layman wrote:

The sales page on that site has fans costing from ?350 to ?900 which is beyond my price range.
Is the hum you mention inherent in all AC fans? I recall having a ceiling fan in a bedroom them in America without noticing any hum. Perhaps there are good designs without any hum problems?
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On 20/07/16 20:03, pamela wrote:

I have a Fantasia Tau 50" in the conservatory. It has 6 forward & 6 reverse speeds. In winter I use it at the lowest reverse speed to just keep the air circulating. In summer, even at full speed, it is only the air movement I hear, never the motor.

I have been in quite a few US motels/hotels with ceiling fans and can't remember any which didn't hum. I sometimes wonder if it's because they are mounted on the ceiling, and that somehow acts as a sounding board. Ordinary floor or pedestal fans never seem to hum.
--

Jeff

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Jeff Layman wrote:

We have 3 US ceiling fans which don't hum and 3 small UK ones of which one hums. Mounting and balance is critical IMO. To stop them humming takes quite a lot of work.
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<snip>

Of the two we have the one we are most likely to hear humming, especially on the lowest speed (as Jeff mentions) is the bedroom one and in spite of my Tinnitus I still have pretty good hearing. I will agree there is, or as you say, *can* hum slightly but that can also be more of a buzz, caused by something in the fitting rather than the motor itself / directly. By that I mean it can be the glass bowl or the lamp in the fitting resonating to the mechanical vibration caused by the motor acting as a transformer.
With a bit of tweaking, those noises can normally be silenced (putting thicker rubber band around the glass lamp bowl under the 3 flange screws or pinching the metal lamp holder in slightly).
Cheers, T i m
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On 20/07/16 22:21, T i m wrote:

I agree with you, but wonder why those motors hum/vibrate. If there was no hum, the mounting wouldn't be critical. I guess one issue is that we have very little to compare fan motors with. Usually, with an AC motor there is quite a bit of associated noise (drill, vacuum cleaner, etc) which drowns out any hum. When my electric mower jammed recently, that made a really loud hum which I'd never noticed before. What low-power (100W or so) mains motors are there other than fans where you might be able to compare the hum levels?
The DC fans have a SMPS, so any "hum" would be above the upper hearing frequency. Mind you, that raises another problem - mine produced a large amount of RFI! Fortunately, being in the conservatory the aluminium frame helped keep it under down. I also fitted a suppressor to the mains leads near the SMPS and that worked well too.

BTDT. But they always seemed to work loose after a while.
Ceiling fans have been around for over a 100 years; you'd have thought they'd have sorted these problems out by now!
--

Jeff

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On 21/07/16 08:26, Jeff Layman wrote:

I think its the motor design pure and simple.
Cheap and cheerful
plus the fact that the fans being slow are fairly quiet
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

AC ceiling fans use shaded pole motors, these produce pulsed propulsion, which is damped by the weight of the fan blade and air resistance. If the blade is not balanced, you will get vibration. Most other appliances use brush motors which are inherently noisier due to higher rotor speeds and commutator roughness. Some lawnmowers use induction motors where the hum is only audible when the rotor is stalled. All consumer motors suffer from being designed down to a price. I have a fan heater which is 60 years old and still running. This is because the sintered motor bearing design was engineered to accept the fan shaft lateral loading. Modern units have inadequate bearings, so clap out after a few years. If it lasts 2 years, that's good enough to sell it!
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