New Roof in Stages

Hi all,
It occurs to me replacing the roof might be a nifty project for the summer months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work, and I wi ll need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was w ondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I 'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, sinc e the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the worse for wear .
Any ideas? Ta.
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     snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net writes:

months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work, and I will need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was wondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, since the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the worse for wear.

I replaced the roof about 2m either side of a complicated valley (cracked tiles and rotted sarking became a leak). It probably took me a day to do each face, some part of which is making good the join between the old and new in terms of sarking and new battens. There were another couple of days to finish off things like repointing the valley, ridge tiles, fitting felt support trays, replacing facias, gutters, etc, but the roof is waterproof without doing that.
I had scaffolding erected with the top lift (platform) some 12" or so below the facias, specified to be strong enough (and wide enough) to take the weight of piles of concrete tiles whilst temporarily removed (they were reused, except the broken ones). A pulley and rope on the scaffolding was very useful too. The scaffolding wasn't expensive and made the job loads easier to do.
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Andrew Gabriel
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snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work, and I will need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was wondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, since the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the worse for wear.

I did this on my house. Starting at one end stripped off a few feet, fitted the new rafters, and new felt. at the end of each day a tarp covered the joint. Once a few metres had been completed I added battens replace the tiles and moved along. I was adding dormers so progress was slowed down building each of the four but still basically the same principle. I took about 6 weeks from memory. Maybe wasted up to an hour each day sheeting down but no need to employ a gang of men to do the job faster.
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On Sunday, February 24, 2013 4:24:31 PM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

he summer months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work , and I will need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was wondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, since the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the wors e for wear. Any ideas? Ta.
Dont even think about it on your own.
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On 24/02/2013 16:24, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

Get scaffolders to to stick a temporary flat roof over the whole place first. Having gaping holes in a roof, even during one of our normal summers is a exercise in stress!
--
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snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

You can't do it on your own - you need to strip off one side and get it recovered in the day, which means rolling out the felt tightly across all the beams and getting it battened, which takes two people, also getting the tiles up there is a two man job even if you hire a mechanical conveyor belt, other than that it means taking 4 tiles at a time up ladders and unloading them onto the roof or scaffold, the first forty or fifty trips are a doddle, after that it gets monotonous
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On 24 Feb,

I replaced a valley, and a lot of the sarking either side. Most of the tiles I left in place until the lower rows were re-done, then used them to add to the lower part of the roof as it was re-felted. This was with interlocking concrete tiles, which were not very well fixed and could be lifted by sliding the next row up (apart from the top row which had had the ridge tiles re-bedded very well).
Removed tiles were stored mainly in the boarded out loft, only new or recut/cleaned tiles were lifted from the ground.
If replacing joists this strategy won't work. It was also a fairly low pitch, about 5' at the ridge. YMMV.
--
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

unless your loft flooring was stregthened before it was boarded, I'd be surprised if the ceiling joists (that's all they were designed for - to hold up plasterboard) would take the weight of many roof tiles without sagging / cracking the ceilings below

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On Monday, February 25, 2013 4:35:21 PM UTC, Phil L wrote:

Not hard to add a few vertical supports in the rooms below.
NT
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On 25 Feb,

TDA trusses, fairly rigid. As I said I only removed enough tiles to enable a strip of the roof to be done at a time. once a strip a little wider than the felt was removed, the ones further up could be moved down. As it was a low pitched roof (25deg) some of the tiles were stored on the roof as well as in the loft. About 10% of tiles reached the ground, mostly peripheral tiles that needed cleaning or cutting, or were faulty.
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On 24/02/2013 21:12, Phil L wrote:

On a terrace house my roofer + mate stripped one side, felted and battened in a day to leave it reasonably water tight before leaving for the night.
which takes two people, also getting the

The roofer employed some causal labour for half a day (2 people) to take the tiles up the ladder. Although both young and fit they both looked totally knackered at the end of the exercise.
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On Sunday, February 24, 2013 4:24:31 PM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

he summer months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work , and I will need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was wondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, since the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the wors e for wear. Any ideas? Ta.
Have you any experance of the building trade or seen how a roof is retiled.
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On Monday, 25 February 2013 00:08:28 UTC+1, Kipper at sea wrote:

I'm a fairly advanced DIYer in general, but have close to zero knowledge of roofing, I freely admit. Seems from the f/b I've seen so far it's not really feasible as a one man job. And we do get a lot of rain where I live. :(
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On Feb 25, 12:27 am, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

led.

of roofing, I freely admit. Seems from the f/b I've seen so far it's not re ally feasible as a one man job. And we do get a lot of rain where I live. : (
I replaced my entire present roof on my own.
I started at the lower part and worked up replacing battens and felting about a metre wide strip at a time/per day. At night when I knocked off, I just poked and wedged the new felt up under the old slates. Eventually I had the whole roof felted and battened. Then put the new slates on.
So it can be done on your own. I reckon I saved about £3500. It rains everywhere. The new felt keeps it out
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On Monday, February 25, 2013 12:27:31 AM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

ou any experance of the building trade or seen how a roof is retiled. I'm a fairly advanced DIYer in general, but have close to zero knowledge of roof ing, I freely admit. Seems from the f/b I've seen so far it's not really fe asible as a one man job. And we do get a lot of rain where I live. :(
Kipper at sea wrote: > > > Have you any experance of the building trade or seen how a roof is retiled. > > I'm a fairly advanced DIYer in general, bu t have close to zero knowledge of roofing, I freely admit. Seems from the f /b I've seen so far it's not really feasible as a one man job. And we do ge t a lot of rain where I live. :( I replaced my entire present roof on my ow n. I started at the lower part and worked up replacing battens and felting about a metre wide strip at a time/per day. At night when I knocked off, I just poked and wedged the new felt up under the old slates. Eventually I ha d the whole roof felted and battened. Then put the new slates on. So it can be done on your own. I reckon I saved about £3500. It rains everywhere. The new felt keeps it out
First thing is, it will require scaffolding, a wastes disposal skip of at l east 6m cubic, a tarp sheet, a couple of spare boards scaffold, theses are placed on edge in the gutter and supported by the vertical scaffold tubes o r a tile batten as a support. Don’t start taking off the roof tiles or sl ates from the bottom as all the loose material from the other rows will col lect on the new underlay felt and in between the lath's. Start at the top o f the roof by taking off the ridge and just hang them over the ridge tree o n the other side, if theses are in good condition can be cleaned of mortar and reused. Strip the tiles or slates off and let them slide down the roof; the scaffold board will stop them from dropping on the scaffolding working area. Usually all the tiles or slates are taken off and cleared into the w aste skip then the lath are taken off from the top down to the bottom. Don ’t be tempted to put the old roof lath in the skip at this time, as they have to be laid in straight not just thrown in. Felt and re lath at startin g from the bottom, when this is completed then the new tiles have to be got up and stacked on the roof ready to be laid.
If you decide to change the type of roof covering, check with the local cou ncil, as they will probably want method statement regarding looks and weigh t. Best check your insurance in case of any damage caused to other properti es and persons. H. S. E doesn’t allow you to throw any waste from the sca ffold into a waste skip. It as to be either carried down or lowered mechani cally. In my opinion its not a job to do on your own unless you can spend continus time on it. Even trying to open a water proof sheet on your own on a roof and fasterning it down ain't easy.
Anything else you want to know just ask
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On Wednesday 27 February 2013 09:50 Kipper at sea wrote in uk.d-i-y:

Yes - a quick word with Building Control is wise. My BCO did not care as I was going from plain to interlockers and the end result weighs less per m2. But if you went the other way it would matter - roofs end up with several tons of material on them...

Funny - my roofers lobbed it straight in. But this was not on the highway and from a single storey.
Another solutiuon is to hire a chute (comes in tubular plastic sections) - fix to scaffold and it forms a tube from the top down into the skip.
Another point is that if changing the appearance radically (or at all if a listed building) might attract the interest of Planning and/or Conservation officers.
If going from basic red/brown to another texture of red/brown and the building is unlisted then it probably won't be a problem. I did not bother as all the houses near me have every type of tile from clay to concerete interlockers in every pattern ever made varying between bright pink to dark brown.

--
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On 27/02/2013 10:19, Tim Watts wrote:

I have seen those used - even onto a skip in the road.
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John.
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On 24/02/13 16:24, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work, and I will need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was wondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, since the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the worse for wear.

Slate Roof Bible: Understanding, Installing and Restoring the World's Finest Roof [Paperback] Joseph C. Jenkins (Author)
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 24/02/2013 16:24, snipped-for-privacy@virgin.net wrote:

months, but there's only me on my jack going to be doing the work, and I will need to disappear off on other projects during the operation, so I was wondering how feasible it is to do something like this in separate stages? I'm going to have to rip everything back off to bare beams, by the way, since the tiles, the sarking and the battens are all looking the worse for wear..

It all depends on the rain.
--
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