Network linked mains timer switch (lighting control)

Hi Everyone,
I am looking for a network (IP) controlled timer switch for village hall car park lighting to replace a mechanical timeswitch. There's a lot of generic, domestic-grade or network server power switches available, but I'm after a particular set of features:
* Network control: standard RJ45 network interface * Three main modes: Timer, manual off, manual on * Possible fourth mode: Ambient light detect/override (for cloudy days/bad weather) * Timer: On time to vary with season / sunset time (like the mechanical one its replacing) * Battery backed real time clock with NTP sync
The main aim is to save energy by having a default off time to coincide with the absolute closing time of the Hall (midnight + a little grace period) on event days, but to allow the Hall Manager to turn the lights off remotely when there are no evening events.
I'm hoping to find something moderately industrial that's not too expensive (under 150-ish) that can also be controlled remotely and from scripts running on a server (I could tie the off time into the hall booking system!)
This might also make an interesting Raspberry Pi / Micro controller project, but I have concerns about implementing a home-brew setup in a commercial environment.
Can anyone suggest any makes/models/possible suppliers from experience.
Thanks.
--
stuffhappens

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 Jan 2014 11:22:42 +0100, stuffhappens wrote:

Is that the only remote requirement? Seems a bit OTT to go down the IP route just for that. Perhaps we are missing some assumptions in the spec or the spec is overall for what the system needs to do rather than just the switch?
Would a simple IP controlled On/Off switch do the switching and all the other dawn to dusk, past end of booking, ambient light etc done elsewhere and just signalled as on/off commands over IP to the switch?
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
'Dave Liquorice[_2_ Wrote: > ;3181933']On Tue, 14 Jan 2014 11:22:42 +0100, stuffhappens wrote:

>

Hi Dave,
It's possible that the main control could be done by a local Linux server (there's already one on site doing other things), but the aim is to make this switch mostly autonomous.
The compromise would be to find an 'industrial grade' IP power switch with some remote control/command ability that doesn't cost several hundred pounds. Network rack switches and the domestic type stuff from the likes of Aviosys aren't quite what I'm after and other options from people like Philips are total overkill/overprice.
Maybe I'll have to get out the Raspberry Pi after all?!
Edit: For some context - the Hall is a new build and fully wired for networking: the CCTV and door entry systems are hooked up, there's a VoIP phone system and secure hardware VPN access to the building, so adding more tech to the network is not a real issue.
--
stuffhappens


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Surely it would be easy enough to add a decent quality relay/contactor to something basically domestic?
--
Small asylum seeker wanted as mud flap, must be flexible and willing to travel

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/01/2014 17:49, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

How much lighting is there?
As I understand, LightWaveRF kit could do the remote bit easily - with the switches able to manage 13A they could handle most of the power load, surely? And the really remote could use a phone (IOS or Android). Not sure how flexible the software side is.
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/01/2014 10:22, stuffhappens wrote:

What sort of lighting? Whats wrong with a lightwaverf relay and some PIRs and timer with the IP gateway if you actually need it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have a Broadband connection use a analogue VoIP adapter and control it overt the phone works very well..
http://www.quasarelectronics.co.uk/Item/velleman-k6501-remote-control- by-telephone-kit
or as you ask IP based...
http://www.digidave.co.uk/jshop/product.php?xProd !1&jssCart83e1e25a 5a7a9b5e320812d7e1ea62
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 14 January 2014 10:22:42 UTC, stuffhappens wrote:

nd from

There are 'ethernet relays' available for around £40:
http://www.robot-electronics.co.uk/acatalog/Relay_Modules.html
However they are dumb in the sense that they only perform the switching - t he remainding functionality you seek would have to be done by your server.
Mathew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all the hints and suggestions - the crux of the matter is that this is a commercial building so any DIY lash-up might cause insurance/liability issues, hence my desire to find something as off-the-shelf as possible - as soon as I customize something I doubt I'll get approval from the hall management to fit it.
Anyway, there's a few ideas in there so I'll be having a good read.
--
stuffhappens

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Jan 2014 18:26:53 +0100, stuffhappens wrote:

So just get a simple IP controlled on off switch and have the machine controlling it off site, could be anywhere in the world. It would need a local manual override but that may well come with it anyway.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.