My Washing Machine wont work

Hi,
I have a Candy Sprint 1000 Washing Machine that has stopped working. When I select any Program including drain only or spin only nothing happens.
The Washer has a seperate On/Off switch to the timer and when the machine is switched on the red light above the timer lights up which shows that it is not the fuse.
In the year before the machine stopped working, the Program selector switch would sometimes rotate clicking from one program to another for about a minute or two before returning to the correct position.
I assume that the Timer/Programmer/Selector is faulty and needs replacing but as I have no experience in repairing washing machines I would be grateful for your suggestions.
Thanks in advance.
John.
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Nothing at all happening sounds fairly fundamental. It can't be just the motor. Unless there is some sensor fault which is telling the machine not to do anything because there is a problem, it could well be the programmer. My brother took one apart to repair a fault in the programmer. Programme cogs everywhere. He fixed it though. Set aside an evening for that kind of thing, assuming you can spot the fault and it is repairable.
Andy.

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It might just be the on /off switch that isn't making properly. The switch might be turning the light on and off, but it might not be contacting properly to let the machine know it's actually on.
My first test would be to by-pass the switch to see if it start the machine. Unplug the machine from the wall and take the lid off. The on/off switch will have spade connectors on it. Make a note of where the wires are connected, then remove them from the switch. Place the load side of the switch to where the feed side is, then plug the machine in and use the switch on the socket as your on/off switch.
Second test is the motor. Make sure the switch is all back together properly first, and leave the machine unplugged. Take a look at the motor brushes. The motor brushes should be in holders that are held in place by clip tags that you can press in toward the motor and slide them out of the motor housing. They should have a wire connecting them to the cable loom plug on the back of the motor, so disconnect it and lift the brush holder out. This will let you see what the brush itself looks like. It should spring out at least 15 mm past the holder tip for it to be any good at keeping the motor running properly. The springs too should be strong enough to press the carbon brushes firmly against the armature (the bit that actually spins) as well.
If the holders look dirty black with carbon, this also causes the motor stall and not run properly, so make sure that the brushes and holders are clean and clear.
That's about the only two you can do yourself without the aid of a multi-meter to test electrical connections and continuity inside the machine. So good luck with it.
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I've known quite a few people to get good shocks from trying to do amateur repairs on washing machines.
All this is kind of what you'd expect from Candy. If it's beyond salvation, bight the bullet and get a decent brand like Bosch, AEG, or if you've really got the dosh a Miele.
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Well the simple rule is to unplug the bugger first. I think washing machines are a perfect example of how to save a fortune through amateur repairs. All you need is a good book and the bottle to turn it on it's side and have a go. In most towns you'll find someone who breaks washiing machines for spares making repars even cheaper.

Zanussi machines are a good compromise and easy to work on as well. Our previous Zanussi lasted 20 years washing at least two loads every day. In all that time it cost around 30 pounds in spares. The "new" one seems just as well built for not a lot of money.
riccip
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We had a Zanussi and I'd certainly never have another one. It had a major repair within the first 18 months which reocurred quite a few times, amongst numerous other faults.
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My parents have had a Zanussi for over 20 years, and I don't recall it ever having gone wrong. However, some aspects of its design were somewhat behind, even when it was new. It has no concept of trying to spread the load round evenly round the drum before spinning, something which other manufacturers had been doing for at least 10 years before this Zanussi was built. It drains out with the drum mostly stationary or only running at tumble speed, and then starts spinning with the cloths in a solid lump. The door interlock at the end of the wash cycle is also stupid. You have to turn the machine off, and then come back 2 minutes later to open the door, even if the wash cycle finished half an hour beforehand. Again, other manufacturers had got this design aspect right long beforehand.
Of course, the reliability of a 20+ year old machine says nothing about the reliability of current products under the same brand name, even if it hasn't been bought and sold several times over that period (as most white goods brand names have).
Parents also got a Zanussi dishwasher at the same time. For the first few years, that seemed to get annual recall notices due to the units bursting into flames, and Zanussi had to keep sending round engineers to modify it. However, it worked without too many problems for perhaps 10 years, and then got replaced as part of a whole kitchen replacement.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Ours was different. It "pulsed" before spinning for that reason, so does the "new" one (now 3 years old).

Once again ours never did that, and it was one of their cheaper models.

10 years is actually very good for a dishwasher. Dishwashers, untl recently, were almost exclusively bad whatever the brand. We had a professional-catering 'Hobart' dishwasher that cost the earth yet only lasted 4 years before going beyond economical repair.
riccip
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I'd advise unplugging it and checking the brushes in the motor - if the machine is more than a few years old, they may have worn out. On my hotpoint, they're cheap and easy to replace.
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On 8 Jul 2005 13:40:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@Aol.com wrote:

Go to the library, borrow the Haynes manual on washing machines. Follow the clear instructions.
If you get confused, come back and post more specific questions.
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Everyone seems to be saying it's the Motor Brushes, but I cant see how worn/broken motor brushes would stop the machine doing a drain only function. It has been suggested to me that by an Ex repairman that it is the Interlock which I have taken out, but I have no way of testing it, apart from a continuity test I did before I took it out, and there is continuity between the live pin on the mains plug and both AC contacts when the main On/Off switch is put into the On position. I do have the Haynes manual but it does not tell me how to test the Interlock or the timer or what the fault is apart from saying it might be the Interlock, I could gamble on buying a new Interlock and if that does not work then buying a new Timer.

Interlock, Timer or electronic module.
Regards,
John.
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