Moving a Consumer Unit

A mate is considering getting his daughter's consumer unit that is in the integram garage moved lower down the wall as when a blown bulb trips it she has to climb on something to re-set it. I have suggested a proper thing to step onto and reset it. I have also suggested fitting LEDs to avoid the regular GU10 failures.
However, it got me wondering - is there some sort of suitable enclosure for connecting all the circuits to extended leads?
Would the CU need to be replaced to comply (if it is not metal)
I am trying to see if it is an easy (cheap) job or a nasty (expensive) job for an Electrician.
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http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu1.jpg
Work done by a regular contributor here.
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On 14/02/2017 09:19, Mike Tomlinson wrote:

That's neatly done, but the rings are terminated in the "extension" box and connected to the RCBOs with a single wire that seems to be the same size. It's probably something that I would do for such a short run, but is it strictly allowed?
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On 14/02/17 11:02, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

I suspect the link wire is the next size up.
But if you want to, just add extra terminals and take the rings right through.
I can also recommend Wago TopJob terminals which are spring loaded.
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On 14/02/2017 11:56, Tim Watts wrote:

I am pretty sure it is 4mm.
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On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 11:02:26 +0000, nospam wrote:

It's very neat, and filed away for future reference!
The only thing I would like to ask about (not a criticism) is: are the bundled wires above 'allowed'? In terms of grouping, or whatever the official term is?
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On 14/02/2017 12:15, Bob Eager wrote:

Bundled wires are certainly allowed (and in many cases unavoidable). However they may result in the need to apply a de-rating factor to the current carrying capacity of the cable. So long as when taken into account the capacity is still adequate for the circuit there is no problem.
See
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Calculating_A_Cable_Size#Effects_of_cable_grouping
Note that the grouping factor applies to circuits and not number of cables - so two ring circuits would count as two, not 4 (or more). The exclusion of circuits with less than 30% of the grouped rating also makes the situation noticeable better - since for example most lighting circuits will be ignored.
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You could also change the MCB to one which will handle a greater fault current before tripping. Think they're called C type?

Since it's in a garage, I'd just used a suitable sized adaptable box. Most wholesalers stock a range.

It depends on which direction the various cables come from. Whether they just need shortening or extending.
A time consuming rather than difficult job. But you could just keep one of those small ally ladders beside it?
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote on 14/02/2017 :

The continuous load rating is similar, what changes is the delay before operating - effectively the speed of response. C's are mainly used where there is an inductive load which might be expected cause a trip on start up.
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Harry Bloomfield explained on 14/02/2017 :

If B's are swapped out for C types, the ELI may also need to be improved too.
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On 14/02/2017 14:13, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

True, although for a 6A MCB you still have a fairly generous 3.64 Ohms to play with.
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Calculating_A_Cable_Size#17th_Edition_Amendment_3.2C_Cmin_factor
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In practice they are less likely to trip when a lamp blows.
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Dave Plowman (News) formulated the question :

Or better, an insulated ladder.
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On 14/02/2017 11:26, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Or a stick.
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On 14/02/2017 18:05, ARW wrote:

Or stop buying cheap bulbs. Use LEDs or low energy types and this problem ??won't occur.
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On 15/02/2017 19:33, Andrew wrote:

It depends on how they fail.
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Yes, I've had both CFLs and an LED short out, but it happens much less often that with a filament lamp.
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It also seems to depend on the type of filament lamp. GLS types never take the breaker here when they blow. 'Spot' types, frequently. But not always.
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On Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:53:25 +0000, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

GLS filament lamps typically have built in fuses to interrupt the resulting arc current that's often instigated by a break in the filament. This arc can keep growing as it consumes the remaining filament, replacing the resistive filament wire, now shrinking in length, with a negative impedance arc which rapidly increases the current until either the built in fuse(s) or else the lighting circuit fuse/MCB blows/trips on the consumer unit itself.
The 'Spot' types don't have enough space to incorporate such "anti-arc" protection so are more prone to blow/trip a lighting circuit fuse/MCB at the consumer unit.
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On Tuesday, 14 February 2017 09:03:20 UTC, DerbyBorn wrote:

In other places they just use insulating tape
http://www.diynot.com/diy/media/20170213_100642-1.99270/
Owain
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