Motor not fixed

As per a previous post I had a faulty motor.
I took it to a local motor place and told them it wasn't spinning properly.
They called yesterday to say it was ready, I asked them if it was spining up
OK, they said they were unable to test it (dunno why but it does have a
funny plug on it).
Anyway it is exactly the same as when it went in, the invoice notes new
bearings and a ovehaul.
Is there any reason why I should pay for this or demand a refund?
Rick
Reply to
R D S
In article , "R D S" writes:
Depends what you asked them to do. If you asked for the bearings to be replaced, then they've done that. If you asked them to diagnose and fix a broken motor, then they haven't done that.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
In article ,
Likely because it has some form of external speed and direction etc controller.
What did you ask for? if you said 'it's not spinning correctly change the bearings' and they've done that then they've fullfilled their contract. If you simply asked them to fix it then possibly not. Assuming the fault is actually with the motor rather than control gear.
Have you contacted them to see what they say?
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Apparently there is a magnet and an encoder in the motor and there is an external box with some gubbins in it.
I told them it didn't spin properly, the only specifics I got into were to suggest that I hoped it just needed bushes.
I am currently waiting for someone to ring me back.
Reply to
R D S
Then ythey aren't qualified to do the job if they cant test it
Reply to
RW
Sounds like a mix up in communication.
Is it a washing machine motor?
Can't they check it with a 'growler'? (google 'motor growler')
cheers, Pete.
Reply to
Pete C
It should spin at 20,000 rpm, now when switched on it spins slowly and only for a few seconds. I described this to them and they said they would be able to tell what was wrong with it so I left it with them.
They admitted they couldn't test it (after doing the work), I hoped that being the experts they claim to be that the problem would have been obvious. However it would appear that they have hoped cleaning it and replacing the bearings would have sorted it out, but it hasn't.
As is now apparent it is more than just a motor, there is electronickery in it. It 'converses' with an external box to which it connects with a plug with about 10 pins. I left the motor with them before Christmas because they told me they were working in between and I would have it back by new year, they didn't and I got it back yesterday. Unable to be without the fekker any more I have had to buy a new one and will have to send the old one in exchange.
2008's 1st example of piss poor service.
Reply to
R D S
Not unless YOU asked them to fix it, as far asI can see you said "I hoped it just needed bushes". My suggestion would be to speak to THEM rather than get opinions from the (helpful) people on here that were not party to YOUR conversation/instructions.
Cheers
John
Reply to
John
In article ,
Again I'd say this 'spin' thing confusing. It should run or turn at 20,000 rpm.
With hindsight, you should have given them the controller too. Unless they are specialists in this particular piece of machinery they can't be expected to know every possible motor ever made. Did they see it before saying they could fix it?
Could be but difficult to establish without knowing the full facts.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
I don't get what you find confusing, it should spin at 20000 but spins very slowly and briefly. If I understand correctly there is a magnet and a pickup within the motor and and an encoder somewhere, I guess that the speed is controlled by the external box.
If anyone thinks this is somehow my fault for telling the motor 'expert' that I hoped it was the just bushes then so be it, if they think that gives them license to take in a motor they can't even run and charge for replacing bits they don't know are faulty then I hope they aren't running businesses. In fact I don't even know if they changed the bushes, invoice states 'bearings and overhaul'.
What would Geoff have done, he normally takes the side of the tradesman? I personally would have pointed out that I had no way of getting the motor to run so I would overhaul it at the customers request and at their risk.
Reply to
R D S
I think [one] point was that "bushes" are bearings (of a sort) and brushes are something different, leading to possible confusion and the possibility they just "did as they were asked". You reply extended the confusion!! Which did you actually suggest - I'm confused!
Reply to
Bob Mannix
Aah, brushes and bushes, yes, I see now the difference. It will all be confusing because I don't specialise in motors[1] which is why I took it to a motor company. In any case I didn't *ask* them to change either.
The original point has been lost, should you have to pay when you ask somebody to repair something but they don't. I asked them srpecifically to repair the motor. Surely *that* isn't confusing.
[1] I'm sure Geoff will be along shortly to tell me that I brought all this on myself because of my lacking knowledge in the motor area.
Reply to
R D S
If they have not done what you specifically asked them to do, then there is no reason why you should have to pay. Why not ring your local trading standards office for more information? You don't say what this motor is from, but it does sound very like the problem I had with a 2 year old washing machine motor. Almost unused too, but out of the guarantee period. It also failed in that it would turn very slowly, and then only for a short time. There was no physical problem as far as I could see, no mechanical drag, and the BRUSHES were in good condition. By the way it had ball bearings, not BUSHES. It also had a speed sensor unit at one end. I thought it was the control electronics, but trying the motor couples direct to the mains (I do know how to do this) showed the motor to be at fault, so got a new replacement, and it worked perfectly. Strange thing is, I could find almost no difference between the old and the new, even checking the field coil and armature resistances apart from a slightly lower resistance in the old field coil. There are 6 connections to the motor, 2 for the field, 2 for the armature via the brushes, and 2 for the speed sensor.
Reply to
Brian
In article ,
Spin suggests what you do to a child's toy, a top - ie spin it up by hand. If someone said to me a motor wasn't spinning correctly that suggests seized bearings. If they said it wasn't running correctly it could be anything. But perhaps it's just me.
Right. A closed loop feedback system.
But did one of their techs see and assess the motor before saying they could fix it? Or was this all done by phone?
It strikes me they may have done just that and the fault is in the controller.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Fair enough, it could be rotated freely by hand and felt smooth.
Initially discussed by phone, verdict obviously "we won't know till we've had a look at it". I dropped it off, they told me they would let me know. I chased it up, it hadn't been looked at yet. I got a phone call to say it was ready. 'Does it spin properly?' I asked, and was advised they couldn't test it. Hopefully I returned to work with it, it was no better.
Reply to
R D S

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