More shed construction queries

(Oh dear. This may end up as a TRIPLE post. Sorry)
I am still fretting over the construction of my new shed.
What is the difference between OSB 2 and OSB 3 (Other than OSB 2 is more expensive on the Trademate site)? And why is OSB 2 so much cheaper per mm in 11 and 18 mm than in 8,9, or 15mm? (Am I missing something?)
Where can I buy plain timber window frames? I don't need Part L compliance, I don't need double glazing, I don't even need pre-glazing at all.
What do people suggest for flooring. I can't decide between T&G, OSB (again), and plywood.
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On Mon, 30 Jul 2007 13:58:12 -0700, Martin Bonner wrote:

=================================A partial answer - window frames. If you're not going for a very elaborate shed then you don't need any window frames as such. The traditional method is to create a suitably sized opening using the actual shed's frame, possibly by inserting a couple of noggins between two uprights. Simple beads (about 1" x 1") are then fitted in the aperture to backup the glass and the same beading is then used on the outside to retain the glass.
If you can find someone doing a conservatory you might be able to beg a few offcuts of clear polycarbonate sheet to use instead of glass. Polycarbonate is safe and adequate for lighting in a shed and has the added advantage that it's difficult for prying eyes to see the contents of the shed.
My sheds have floors of 2' x 2' paving slabs - no rot.
Cic.
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How do you seal the sides to the floor to stop water getting in?
Paul
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On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 14:12:24 +0100, Paul wrote:

=================================I design the shed to fit the base so that the slabs are above ground (2" above) and the shed walls form a drip outside the slabs and just short of the ground. No actual sealing necessary.
Cic.
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WBP ply (with ventilation underneath). OSB doesnt survive wetness. Theres no need to T&G boards if you use them.
Freecycle should supply glass in the form of old windows.
NT
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On Jul 31, 1:30 pm, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Really???
I thought OSB used the same glue as WBP?
I'm sure there is both crap WBP and OSB around, the best way to test I expect is to boil an offcut.
cheers, Pete.
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