Minimal cost/effort projector screen

I've been looking at various commercial and homebuilt projector screens. Some are expensive, some have very bad reviews and some require quite a bit of work.
I have an old brick and plaster internal cottage wall. It doesn't seem too bad for smoothness but there is some heavily embossed anaglypta paper on there.
I'm thinking of cutting the required rectagular size out of the existing wallpaper and replacing it with a smooth paper, perhaps lining paper, then painting the screen area with some appropriate paint.
I'm not a home cinema geek. I bought my used projector for 20 quid from a local website. This I mention just to give some context to my expected cost level.
Any helpfull hints and tips would be most appreciated.
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Richard Treen

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Richard Treen wrote:

Any flat white area will work but the brightest screens used to be glass beaded.
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wrote:

I checked and see that many still are. It's quite a game isn't it?
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Richard Treen

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Yes but tended to be very narrow on their viewing angle which I suspect was helped a bit by the curvature. Brian
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On Wednesday, 18 October 2017 13:57:11 UTC+1, Richard Treen wrote:

You can use aluminium flake but white is fine. Don't expect the projector to last though, the less you use it the better really.
NT
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 06:36:36 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

One of several flies in the ointment.
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On 18/10/2017 13:57, Richard Treen wrote:

That stuff can cover a multitude of sins (and very probably does).

Even magnolia will work OK since the eye has an automatic white balance.

Dulux does a superwhite paint that might be suitable, but it might look a bit out of place in a living space. How big will the screen be?
You can get 3mm and 5mm foamed PVC sheet in large sizes and it is flat. 8'x4' is about £30. Otherwise I'd use plasterboard and white paint.
Expect to need a second mortgage when the projector bulb expires - it is often cheaper to buy a next generation projector than a new replacement bulb for an older model! I'm not kidding!
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Martin Brown
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:50:12 +0100, Martin Brown

92" diagonal. About 45 by 80 inches

That sounds like good stuff maybe a bit thin to hang on the wall but maybe it would stick on and be more effective than paper.

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Richard Treen

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The 5mm is certainly rigid enough to hang, and either can be stuck to the wall with no more nails type adhesive.
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Jón Fairbairn snipped-for-privacy@cl.cam.ac.uk

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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:57:13 +0100, Richard Treen

You can get paint intended for the purpose .
Or you can actually get screen material loose like wallpaper, or if you find one big enough a second hand screen and remove the material from the mounts and stick it on the wall.

The tins of paint mentioned above are about 3 times that and I have no idea how effective they really are. Without knowing if your projector was originally only £300 and unlikely to benefit from a really good surface or one that was once £3000 a few years back and has been replaced by an enthusiast upgrading for fashion (do Apple make projectors ?) and still delivers a really high definition picture that a coat of Dulux white won't do justice to is only something you can decide.
Nothing to stop you doing that and putting more expensive stuff over later if it isn't good enough.
G.Harman
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:54:51 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

I'm not terribly fussy. I've seen the ultra expensive paint in my searches and I think it's probably wonderful stuff for the connoisseur.

That makes sense, thanks.

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On Wednesday, 18 October 2017 13:57:11 UTC+1, Richard Treen wrote:

If you can live without widescreen you can pick up old slide projector screens on tripods for little or no money.
Cut them down to make a smaller widescreen.
You can also buy PVC coated off-white blackout blinds from eg Argos for very little.
If you want beaded glass, you can get the glass beads from road white-lining suppliers and dash them on to wet paint.
Owain
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 07:34:46 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Sounds like a great idea. Even distribution might be tricky. Maybe totally smother the surface then shake off the excess?

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On Wednesday, 18 October 2017 13:57:11 UTC+1, Richard Treen wrote:

Projector screens have glass microbeads on the surface. Makes a brighter picture.
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 07:36:55 -0700 (PDT), harry

I'm definitely warming to that idea.
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On 18/10/2017 16:43, Richard Treen wrote:

Try it with one of the better brilliant white emulsion formulations before you splash out on anything too exotic. You pay dearly for that last 5% improvement and in a darkened room it doesn't much matter.
Projecting in a less than dark room the microbeads make the picture look brighter and contrasty for the audience on axis with the projector.
Basically light goes back along a broader path that it came in along. Flat white and any light hitting at shallow angles kills the blacks.
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Martin Brown
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On Wednesday, 18 October 2017 16:59:39 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:

You _don't_ want brilliant white, they are darker than plain white. Brilliant has a very tiny bit of blue added.
How you would ever get even distribution of microbeads on a wall I can't imagine, it's not remotely worth considering unless you find you just can't get enough brightness.
NT
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On Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:35:15 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I think you're right. It would maybe have to be applied somehow off the wall.

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brilliant white, they are darker than plain white. Brilliant has a very tiny bit of blue added.

A quick search shows glass beaded 100 inch diagonal roller-blind style screens available for about £100. Second-hand screens would presumably be a lot less. Could you not remove the screen from such an item and mount it on a board?
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Graham.
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wrote:

Thanks, I'll have a look around for one of those.
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