Keys in both sides of a lock?

Are all locks designed this badly? I just had to break into my neighbour's house because he'd left a key on the inside of the lock, which prevented him from using a key on te outside of the lock. Can't they be made so the keys don't reach each other? It must be seperate barrels, or the key being the other way round wouldn't work unless it was symmetrical. There was only about 3mm in it!
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On 03/10/2017 18:00, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

If you are talking about Euro locks, the default is that you can't insert a key when there is one on the other side.
You can buy ones where you are specifically able to.
I am not certain, but I have a feeling that I have seen ones where a second key can push the 1st key out from one side, but not from the other.
SteveW
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I don't know what type it's called. It's in a fairly modern door, and the keys look Yale shaped, not mortice shaped. But the position of the lock is where a traditional mortice lock would go. I didn't check what position the inner key was in, it might have not been straight so unable to come out. I tried to push it from the outside, but the key was 3mm short of getting in far enough to turn. It seems a pretty bad design if you can easily prevent yourself from using your own key in your own door. He'd locked the back door from the inside, then popped out of the front door later on, closing it on the latch on the Yale lock. He knew he had the back door keys in his pocket, so thought he could get back in. I ended up having to remove one of their windows and climb inside to unlock the door.
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James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

You have the option when selecting a euro cylinder to exactly how it behaves with a key on each side. There are youtube videos showing how the interlock mechanism works if you are interested.
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I doubt most people even know to ask about that. My neighbours are pensioners.

Ouch, I looked up Euro locks on Youtube and have seen many many ways to open them without keys. Secure my arse! Maybe I should have broken his lock instead of the window.
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On Tue, 3 Oct 2017 18:08:09 +0100, Steve Walker wrote:

All of the Euro cylinders that I've had and also fitted for other people have been very simple: the 2 keys are too long to be in together (this wouldn't be so in longer locks, but I've never used those). If a key is in and slighly turned there isn't room for the other key; if the key is not turned, the other key can push it through a bit.
I suppose that long locks would need a mechanism to stop entry when not desired ;-)
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Surely that method is.... the burglar doesn't have the key? Having an extra "mechanism" to stop entry is admitting the lock is pickable.
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All affordable locks are pickable. Its about making them harder to pick by making it easy to avoid them being picked when you are inside etc.
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My back door is like this. I think its pretty standard. Brian
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SNAFU. Situation normal, all fucked up. Nobody thinks before designing things.

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On 03/10/2017 23:28, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

There may well be a reason - with many traditional locks you can slide a button on the inside, which prevents a key being used from the outside. The "one key prevents another being inserted" may be a deliberate feature to "replicate" this function.
SteveW
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Never seen the point in that. I have a traditional Yale type lock and have never used that button. Why would I wish to prevent someone (probably myself) with a valid key from unlocking the door?
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wrote:

It stops a pick being used.

Because it can be a criminal, stupid.
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On Wednesday, 4 October 2017 00:20:32 UTC+1, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

I wouldn;t want someone breaking into my place when I was there what would be the point of them doing that unles sit was the fire brigade or a medical emergancy. People have used bolts on doors and mortice locks been locked at night for years I thought most people locked themselves in.
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But if the lock works properly and cannot be picked, why do you need extra steps to prevent someone with a valid key from unlocking it?
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wrote:

Agreed. If the lock works as designed, there's no point in preventing a key being used from outside. I suppose if "one key prevents another being inserted", it also makes it (presumably) much harder for anyone without a key being able to pick the lock. It is a two-edged sword, though, because it's also possible for a burglar to break the glass, retrieve the key and then use it from the outside. In the olden days of doors with a large gap between the door and the floor, it also allowed someone to joggle the key out of the lock onto a piece of paper that you put through the gap, and then you pull the paper back with the key on it. That only works with a) internal doors that don't have a ledge on the bottom edge that the door butts up against, and b) if there's enough of a gap, which isn't the case with modern doors that rub against a carpet and doesn't leave a big enough gap to get the key through.
The problem comes when it locks someone out who has a key. Several times I've gone out while my wife has been in the house, and she's put her key in the inside of the front door after I've locked it from the outside, and I've been unable to get back in when I return home. That's usually resolved by knocking and ringing until she unlocks the door, usually with a sheepish "oh shit, I forgot".
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wrote:

Corse there is if you know no one with a key will want to use it from outside, because they are all inside.
And you have the key in the lock on the inside so that if the place does catch fire, you can be sure that you can get out of that door as quickly as possible if necessary.

That's less clear. Presumably the picker can just use something to push the key that's been put in the lock from the inside, right out of the lock onto the floor and they are then free to pick the lock in the usual way.

That only true of doors that stupidly have glass panels in them or next to them.

And its all academic with decent modern electronic locks which don't need a key at all.

That's to give the milkman time to put his pants back on and get out the back door while she's letting you in.

And has let the milkman or Adam escape.

And you were silly enough to believe her {-(
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On Wednesday, 4 October 2017 13:05:15 UTC+1, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

What makes you so sure it's a valid key ? whatever that means. Are skeleton keys valid. ?
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Which would mean the lock is rubbish. If you're out of your house, how can you lock it from the inside to prevent a key being used?
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On Wednesday, 4 October 2017 15:05:02 UTC+1, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

You can't, but when leaving the house you have to have some way of getting back in, but when already in the house you don't need a way to get in because you're already in.
Leaving your key in the door when you're inside has advanatges too, such as in a fire you don't have to go find your key and neither does anyone else who might happen to be in your house. There are disadvantages too if someone broke in or could get to yuor key through the letter bix like I did once. (although) that was an advantage in my case.
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