Integral or Capillary

Hi,
Just wondering which type of fitting is best/suitable for central
heating system. I'm happy with doing both types but just have better
success with capillary. I am only shortening one pipe to fit a smaller
double radiator.
Thanks
Olly
Reply to
Olly
In article , Olly writes
For simple stuff I use capillary, the cost premium is minimal and they're so simple to use. I use end feed where I have a number of joints close together that have to be made separately.
Reply to
fred
Is there a terminology difference going on here?
AFAIK the solder joints all work by capillary action, and so I'd call them end feed and yorkshire/solder ring.
Is Olly saying he has better success with end feed?
(in which case the answer is simply "use that then". Indeed the basic answer is to use whichever you're happier with.)
cheers, clive
Reply to
Clive George
Suppose I did mean end feed thanks thats good was just checking if there was a certain one to use with heating as every heating system ive looked at has end fed joints. Thanks thats this weekend sorted Olly
Reply to
Olly
Solder rings don't always have to work by capillary action, if you don't heat them for long enough. It's possible to make them just by melting the ring in situ without correct flow. It's obviously a weaker resultant joint, particularly if there's vibration around..
If you can do it right in the first place, an end feed is just as easy. It's not rocket science.
IMHO, if you're Drivel, use a ring. If you want it to work, use an end feed. Neater and cheaper too.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
In article , Clive George writes
Yes, my bad, substitute solder ring where I said capillary and all is well.
Though as you say, if Olly is happy to use end feed then why not.
Reply to
fred
I assume you mean end feed vs yorkshire fittings (both of which are capillary fittings). Use whichever works best for you. End feed is cheaper and looks neater, it also takes less heating and so it quicker. Yorkshire is slightly "simpler" since you don't need to add solder.
Reply to
John Rumm
Well, they are cheaper, look better, and if you're any good you don't need the shortcut of the solder ring fitter, so since at a guess most heating isn't DIYed (posters here excepted :-) ) it would seem likely that it's all done with end feed.
Enjoy :-)
cheers, clive
Reply to
Clive George
In article ,
I assume you're comparing yorkshire (solder ring) with end feed? If so the parameters for making a good joint are identical - cleanliness, decent flux and the correct amount of heat. For a couple of joints the difference in cost may be small but for many end feed gives a considerable saving as well as looking neater.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article ,
Unless you see the solder flow at the fitting edge I'm not quite sure how you'd know it had melted anywhere? I've come across a yorkshire which wasn't leaking and had never been heated. ;-)
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
This can be an advantage if you're making a joint in an awkward place where you can't get another hand to to feed solder. Personally I use solder-ring for most common fittings since they're cheap enough, but end-feed for more exotic ones where the price of yorkshire is exorbitant.
I suspect most traditionally-trained pro plumbers use end-feed as that's what they were taught in college.
Reply to
John Stumbles
For soldered fittings, I guess I use a mix of 90% end feed, and 10% Yorkshire - for just the reasons you cite... (or on the odd occasion you need to get something in a hurry from a shed and they only have Yorkshire.
Reply to
John Rumm
On Thu, 11 Oct 2007 11:47:59 +0100 someone who may be John Rumm wrote this:-
If I was working in pipework then I would certainly use end feed fittings, just for the cost. However, as I only ever do DIY pipework and can go months without making any joints, the extra cost of Yorkshire fittings is not dramatic. Provided they are heated up properly, by heating the pipe rather than the fitting, they are almost foolproof.
Reply to
David Hansen
While we're on the subject of soldered joints, how do you clean the ends of the pipes and the inside of the fittings? I use wire wool and for the fittings I rotate it inside using my little finger usually as that's the only one that fits. Needless to say my finger soon gets sore. there must be a pro way to clean fittings etc. What is it?
Also is there a website that has a video showing how to make capillary joints (not yorkshire)?
Reply to
clangers_snout
In article ,
Just use an aggressive flux. The inside of fittings don't usually get contaminated with anything that can stop this working - unlike the outside of tubing. Helps if you keep fittings in a stout plastic bag etc to stop them getting 'dirty' in the first place.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
For pipe ends I use Naylor's plumber's abrasive strip on a roll (from BES) and/or those pot scourers that look like steel swarf. For inside fittings a cylindrical wire brush for the job, from screwfix, toolstation or any PM.
Reply to
John Stumbles
Not by sticking a finger in it!
A roller wheel cutter leaves a sharp burr on the inside of the pipe. Stick your finger in there, rotate it, and the slice you can get from the edge will make you wish you'd stuck to woodpeckers.
There are wire brushes sold specially for this. They're cheap.
It's a bit like working with plastic pipe. Yes, you can use a hacksaw for cutting it, it just doesn't work at all well.
Reply to
Andy Dingley

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