How to cut large sheets of laminate?

I need to cut up a 10' x 4' sheet of laminate into a couple of 2 inch by
8 foot strips and a couple of 3 foot squares.
What's the best way to chop down laminate?
If the pieces were smaller, I'd score and snap but the chances of
scoring and snapping an 8 foot 2 inch strip successfully seem pretty low.
Can you put it through a table saw? It seems like it would chip at best
and probably vibrate and shatter at worst.
I'm planning to use a laminate trimming bit to get the final finish.
Any advice appreciated.
Reply to
mike
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
I think I'd use a fine-toothed jigsaw.
You'll have to support it fully - both sides of the cut - whatever you do, preferably holding it onto the supporting boards with clamps.
Reply to
Roger Mills
Since they mainly cut on the upstroke, it might be better to turn the laminate upside-down before clamping. Don
Reply to
Donwill
================================== This will do the job but you lose 1/8" (width of blade)for each cut:
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will still need to finish either by sanding or by trimming bit.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
This is exactly what I had to do about 25 - 30 years ago in our first house. No pre formed worktops in them days thee knows. Formica was the in thing.
I'm pretty sure I scored & snapped the edge strips - can't think of any other technology availaible back then.
That being the case they could be as rough as a badgers ar*e & it wouldn't matter, so a jigsaw would work - supporting the edge will be your biggest problem.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
In article ,
Thanks for all the replies. I hadn't even considered the dreaded jigsaw, but it seems obvious now.
Cic's gadget looks nice too though ;-)
Reply to
mike
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
It would do the job but would take a long time to nibble all along an 8' cut (and your hands would get sore!).
Reply to
Roger Mills
================================== It's designed for the job and it's almost as easy (and as fast) as using a pair of large shears / scissors. Of course it's slower on metals but it crunches through Formica like a starving piranha in a swimming pool.
We're rather too cossetted today by having so many power tools to do the most basic jobs.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
Mike,
Use the edge of a sharp 1" wood chisel to score from the face to about half way through and then snap the piece off - that's how I did it as an apprentice a very long time ago.
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G

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