How to cap a radiator valve after removing radiator?

I have removed a radiator in a room that's changing use (and there will be other things attached to the wall where the radiator was).
I'm happy enough that the lock-shield valve will be watertight and tamper proof but I'm not at all convinced about the thermostatic valve at the other end - in fact I've knocked it a couple of times and provoked a squirt of water.
Is there anything designed to cap the end or, alternatively, what's the best way to bodge it? It had a fairly large diameter union onto a short stub which in turn was screwed into the radiator. Even if I knew what size the nut is I'm not sure what one would need to make a watertight cap.
--
Chris Green

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On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 16:30:46 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

Wait until the room cools down a bit and the valve opens properly. B-)
Thermosatic valves are supplied with a maintenace cap. You remove the thermosatic head and screw the cap down in its place this closes the valve properly.
For a permenant fix you need to properly cap the pipes. Compression stop ends would be the easiest by reusing the nut and olive from the old valves. Best would be soldered stop ends.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 02/03/2012 17:12, Dave Liquorice wrote:

But it's highly desirable to fit the maintenance cap *before* removing the radiator!
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Cheers,
Roger
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On 02/03/2012 17:12, Dave Liquorice wrote:

If you're quick, and I was once, you can remove the radiator valve by undoing the nut while firmly pushing the valve onto the pipe, then whipping off the valve with thumb ready to cover the pipe. Use a reverse operation to place the compression cap on the end of the pipe. If you're luck and quick you'll lose surprisingly little water.
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2012 18:01:12 +0000, Fredxx wrote:

If you have a normal open vented system bung corks in the vent pipe and feed from the tank and very little water escapes. Do not have more than one point in the pipe work open at time, that would allow air in and water out...
Never had a pressurised system but I should imagine if you de pressurise completely then seal it back up you can again open one point at a time.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 02/03/2012 19:53, Dave Liquorice wrote:

I found the inertia of water in the pipe was significant in reducing loss in the time the pipe was open. 16-20 ft of head is still over 0.5 Bar pressure.
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2012 20:14:25 +0000, Fredxx wrote:

Yeah but with the system blocked off you don't have 1/2 a bar of pressure squirting nasty black SLF onto the carpet or up the wall paper...
You might get a desert spoonfull of drible but that's about all.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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There is a fitting designed to do this, it is made by +GF+ I assume George Fisher castings. It is a cast iron cap that screws onto the radiator valve and blanks it off. I normally just walk into the local Plumb Centre and ask for a couple and have no idea what they are called. They are marked as either 3/4" or 1/2" depending on the size. Plus a bit of PTFE tape of course.
I have just spent the last half hour Googling looking for them and failed.
The best I can offer is a mobile phone picture of one, so if you are desperate I'll upload one later. If you find the name let me know!!
--
Bill

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Not quite what I was thinking of, but these look as if they would do.
<http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1-2-3-4-End-Cap-End-Stop-Blanking-Nut-Fibre-Di sc-/150589801535>
http://tinyurl.com/78f88d7
--
Bill

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Wrong sex! The valve has a 'nut' connecting it to a male thread sticking out of the radiator.
--
Chris Green

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On 02/03/2012 21:59, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

Never seen a female rad valve before, normally they are male. However, something like this from a proper plumbers merchant;
http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Plumbing/Compression/Compression+Stopend+22mm/d20/sd2697/p66318
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On 02/03/2012 16:30, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

These are made for the job, plumbers merchant will sell them. The bodge is to join the two with a washing machine hose. Don't ask me how I know...
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Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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What "these" are made for the job?
--
Chris Green

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