Hosed the bathroom by mistake!

In the final stages of completing the bathroom refurbishment. So connect the tap and the waste drain, connected the two flexi hoses to the tap and then just the hot to the incoming pipe, thought to test the tap was ok ...turns it on and water starts pissin out the cold water flexi hose, as the water was sputing out the tap I didnt realise it was going all over the floor from the cold unattached flexi hose.
Ah well we live and learn.
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Do they all do that I wonder? I thought there were rules about not contaminating the mains cold water with the hot.
--
Graham.

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Going back to having water pissing out all over the place...
I once had to change the immersion heater element in the *side* of my hot water cylinder. This meant draining the header tank, disconnecting the inlet and outlet pipes, walking the still full cylinder round to get at the drain cock which was on the *back*, and emptying the cylinder through a hosepipe.
When I took the immersion heater box spanner back to the hire shop, the guy told me about a customer who had forgotten a) to let the tank cool down, and b) to empty it of all the water (turning off the inlet or emptying the header tank isn't enough). And so he unscrewed the element and when it was held by the last thread, the pressure was too great for the thread to hold it, so he was punched in the goolies by an immersion heater element which shot out, propelled by a 4" "plug" of scalding hot water - and once the element was out, there was no way to put it back in again, so he had to wait for a hundred or so litres of hot water to run through the house. That would have been one hell of an insurance claim...
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Luckily our tank is designed a bit more sensibly than the one in your example and it can be all drained down and isolated enough to get the element out without a completely empty cylinder. I am eternally amazed though when you get the heater out how bent and encrusted it gets just heating water. Brian
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My hot water cylinder had the header tank joined onto the top of it (*), so there was no explicit inlet feed pipe to disconnect. The outlet needed to be unscrewed (after I'd emptied the header tank and hot water system as much as possible by opening the hot taps) and then the tank was "free" to be rotated on the baulks of wood that it was standing on. That makes it sound very easy: in practice it was a case of tipping it onto one baulk, rotating it a bit, rocking it onto the other and rotating it etc, which took a while to get it far enough round to reach the drain cock. Which silly herbert designed the tank with the drain cock on the *back*?
Cylinders with the element going in vertically through the top don't need to be drained, but I could see that mine would need to, because it had two elements (daytime and Economy 7 tariffs) going in through the side: the daytime one heated the top 1/3 of the cylinder and the night time one heated the whole cylinder.
When I got the element out, only half of it was there: the ends of some of the loops were still inside, having exploded off when the thing shorted out at 1AM when the Economy 7 timer turned on - made a hell of a bang and left black scorch marks on the fuse box.
I removed the cylinder completely (carrying it downstairs on my own was amusing!) and hosed it out on the drive, and there was a *lot* of limescale in the bottom - plus the remains of the element. I'd estimate several kilogrammes of limescale, which probably filled up to the level of the lower heating element. And that was with only about 5 years' use, because the house was only 5 years old from new. While I had the tank out, I removed the other, daytime element and checked that, but the metal was still shiny because I imagine it had not been used nearly as much except for occasionally topping up the hot water if all the water heated overnight had been used up.
(*) Saves the builder the hassle of putting a header tank, a cold water feed and a pipe from tank to cylinder in the loft. It was a bit noisier because you could hear it gurgling in the airing cupboard as it refilled after running hot water, but it worked well enough.
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On Monday, 19 August 2019 23:11:57 UTC+1, NY wrote:

uy

and

I had a slightly similar experience; we (plumber and I) drained the tank do wn till the water stopped flowing out the drain valve, then loosened the pi pes to walk the tank round till the bottom connection was at the front to t ilt it to get the bottom water out.
I wondered aloud why the hole was so furred up in a soft water area and the plumber poked his screwdriver into it. At this point we realised that the tank was not empty and all that was holding the water in was probably a str ay bit of foam insulation (which stopped holding the water in).
Fortunately there were two of us, and buckets handy. If I'd been on my own I'd have been stuck with my thumb in the hole until the postman called ... some days later ... don't get many letters these days.
Even the plumber was a little bit startled by the experience.
Owain
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On 19/08/2019 23:11, NY wrote:

Was this a special one? They are only £10 to buy new.
--
Adam

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I made enquiries in my local hardware shops (the equivalent of B&Q - maybe Smith's DoItAll in those days) and they all said that they didn't stock them and recommended a hire shop. That was in the late 80s or early 90s.
It was a box spanner rather than a flat one, because the amount of spray-on insulation on the cylinder prevented me using a flat one with a slightly cranked end, which is the more common type. I remember it was bloody heavy to carry: there was a lot of steel there!
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On 19/08/2019 22:52, Graham. wrote:

I havent a clue but maybe because the tap lever was in a mid position it meant both tap outlets were open, if I had had the tap lever swivelled for hot only possibly it would not have happened.
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On 19/08/2019 23:25, ss wrote:

Yup, if its a proper mixer tap, as many bathroom ones are[1] then that will happen.
[1] Kitchen style ones usually have a pair of concentric spouts that cause the water to be delivered separately and mix outside of the tap.
--
Cheers,

John.
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On 20/08/2019 10:24, John Rumm wrote:

Yes makes sense when you think about it and guess who never thought it through :-(
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This is the finished bathroom, probably the last major project I will undertake and just stick to painting and leisurely woodwork.
Just have to contend with my wife now who says the toilet seat is the wrong size, the fan is too noisy and the lighting is too dull.:-(
https://imgur.com/MElXIz4
https://imgur.com/M0b7LrL
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Time to trade her in on a new bimbo if you can still get it up.

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On 20/08/2019 11:19, ss wrote:

I ended up swapping one of the seats on ours, since although it matched and looked ok, it was not very comfortable. The choice of options on yours might be a bit smaller though due to the shape of the pan.
What kind of lighting did you go for?

Very good looking result, I would be pleased with that.
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John.
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On the subject of noisy fans, if you're thinking of using one the fans with a counter current heat exchanger[1] with outside air (the Ventaxia model at least) go for the six inch one, rather than the four inch one. It is significantly quieter.
[1] chosen for reducing drafts rather than to save the planet
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Roger Hayter

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Roger Hayter wrote:

sort of single-room MVHR?
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I suppose, although the ROI is probably rather low! But I got it to reduce draughts in a wet room with no shower screen.
--

Roger Hayter

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On 20/08/2019 14:07, Roger Hayter wrote:

I took out the 4 " and replaced with a 6" and the idea was to replace the 4" piping with 6" only to find out that where it went in to the loft I had about 2 feet headroom and would have been eating insulation, as for where it exits I dont know. So I got a 4" to 6" pipe adaptor and used that. Even in my younger days I would have struggled with the access.
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On 20/08/2019 15:58, ss wrote:

One way to reduce the noise quite a bit is with a ducted fan rather than a surface mount one. That way the motor noise etc is out of the room.
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Cheers,

John.
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Kind of reminds me about an incident shortly after we came here with the old bathroom suite. The bathroom is directly above the kitchen, and at that time the Kitchen had one of those ceiling mounted globe lights with a 100w bulb in it. So Father has a bath, Mother in kitchen doing some snacks. As the bath drains the globe light starts to fill with water, but the light is still on.
Mother notices and dad puts the plug back in the bath.
The up bend had partially come away from its pipe and water was spreading out inside the ceiling void and trickling down the light fitting. Bloody amazing nobody got electrocuted really, considering the crude fuse wire consumer unit in place at the time. It took days with floorboards up in the bathroom and fan heaters on to dry it all out. Luckily it was not able to soak into the plaster and make it collapse as we caught it in time. It was interesting for a few days skipping over the holes in the bathroom floor to go to the loo though. Quite how the globe did not detach from the ceiling with it three quarters full of water is anyone's guess, this after all was the age of bakelite. Brian
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