holding a door for electrical planing

Hi,
I need to plane the bottom of an internal door and have done this with other doors using an electrical plane. But when I did it before, I had someone to help me by holding the door upright so I could stand on some steps and run the plane along the top. Now she won't be there to help and I'm going to have to do it on my own.
What's the best way to hold the door tight? I'm sure I've seen tradesmen use electrical planes on doors without assistants, but I can't remember exactly how they've done it! There's no way I can stand it on the floor and plane the top as before - it wouldn't stay still.
Thanks in advance!
Harry
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Is that so? :-) I'll be OK if I clamp it to the table, then.
The reason I did it the other way before is to make gravity my friend, pulling the plane down evenly onto the surface being planed. It's quite a heavy plane and we did several doors - about a dozen including cupboard doors - and the amount of vibration was close to the maximum I would want to withstand.
Thanks again!

Harry
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On Tuesday, June 2, 2015 at 9:22:00 PM UTC+1, Harold Davis wrote:

How about: stand it on the stairs and tie it to the ballustade. then the top of the door can be placed (choose the right step) at a convenient height above 1st floor level and you can keep gravity as your friend.
Robert
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Excellent. Stair wells are always good places for DIY projects. Canoe, anyone?
:-)
--
Graeme

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On 02/06/2015 21:06, Harold Davis wrote:

Don't use a plane. Use a circular saw and a sawboard with the door on a bench or blocks.
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On 02/06/2015 21:46, David Lang wrote:

is the right answer
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Andy's dads way is the traditional way of planing the end of a door with a hand plane, however I would not recommend doing it that way with an electri c plane. As you have to stand astride the door holding it in place with you r knees, one slip and you could find yourself planing your knee caps. The o nly safe power tool method in my opinion is to use a router. I have a Tee-s quare like guide which I clamp to the door with the Tee part held against t he long edge at the end of the cut with a sacrificial piece of timber held in between. This produces good edges without splinters, the only problem I have encountered with this method is the tendency on some cheap panel doors to use staples to hold the framing timbers together during manufacture, bu t these are a problem whatever method is used.
Richard
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On 02/06/2015 21:46, David Lang wrote:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard
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John.
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Yes, but I haven't got one! :-) Are you saying it's not feasible for someone to do it on their own with an electric plane?
Harry
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If he is saying that, he's wrong.
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I've laid the door on its side, on blocks so the plane will go all the way down to the end, and held it upright with a B&D Workmate. And then plane vertically. You do *have* a Workmate, right? :o)
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No I haven't got one of those either, but could buy one. Have you done what you describe with a 1000W+ 3kg+ electrical planer that vibrates like nobody's business?
Harry
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On 08/06/15 10:35, Harold Davis wrote:

A leccy planer that weighs less and vibrates less will set you back next to nowt as will hiring one
Another possible is to clamp a straight edge as guide to the door and use a router, suitably supported...

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[28 lines snipped]

If your planer "vibrates like nobody's business", there's something wrong with it. I have a 710W Freud one from Screwfix which probably weighs a couple of kilos & I have planed doors with it as I describe.
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I've got two electric planes, and neither vibrates. They do tend to kick when you switch them on - I'd hope a modern one is soft start.
They are not the easiest of devices to use though. Probably need more skill than a hand plane. And the blades need very careful setting to get a true cut, even with skill.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I have to agree with Dave that electric hand planes are not the easiest of beasts to use especially when you have to operate them in anything other th en their normal operating mode, namely horizontally along a length of wood. The traditional method ie. Andy's dads method or as shown in the wiki or t he Workmate method are fine when using traditional Jack planes but a whole different kettle of fish with an electric planer. As I said In my previous post to do the top and bottom you have to stand astride the door holding it with your knees to stop movement and bent over being at full stretch by th e time you end the stroke. I cannot see anybody advising any one that it is safe to run a power tool parallel to part of your body where one slight lo ss of control means your legs are the next thing it hits. It would be like placing a piece of wood in a Workmate then sitting on the Workmate with you r legs either side of the wood to be planed and proceeding to plane with yo ur electric planer. Likewise clamping the door horizontally to trestles/wor kmates and running the planer at right angles means you do not have full co ntrol of the machine as you have gravity working against you. I am not sayi ng you will not see so called "professionals" doing either but it is foolha rdy to do so. I am no 'elf & safety freak but strongly believe in not putti ng parts of my body in the way of fast turning sharp power tools. If you do not feel you can manage the task with a traditional plane and need to use a power tool than a router is your best bet. All you need is a guide suitab ly offset clamped to the door, a sacrificial piece of wood at the end of th e router traverse and you will get splinter less edges and crucially all yo ur body parts intact. If you have many doors to do then spending a little t ime knocking up a bit of a jig will save time in set up. By all means use a n electric planer for the long edges of the door, but not the top and botto m.
Richard
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Wise words. My brother was making a chair, and using an electrical 'thing' to carve out the bum shaped indentation in the seat. Not wearing his usual protective gear, and the tool slipped, hitting his thigh. He said it didn't cut him - it just vapourised the flesh. His wife drove him to the nearby hospital, and he was OK, but now has a large indentation in his thigh just below you know where.
--
Graeme

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My Dad drilled a hole in his arm when I was about 12.
He was disabled - paralysed on the left hand side. Though could just about swing his arm about and hang onto something with it in the crook of his elbow.
We had a climbing frame that needed repairing. He had to stand on the bottom bar to reach, hung on with his arm - drill slipped and straight into his arm. Very painful at the time, but he didn't hit the bone AFAICR, so healed up easily enough
--
Chris French


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Huge wrote:

I have, and I only used it a few days ago, still just took me 15 minutes to find it hiding behind the roofrack ...
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I chucked the roofracks out a while ago. I don't own a car they'll fit on any more.
But I would like to know where my stock of threaded rod is, though.
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