Getting a mains cable down underground ducting

ARWadsworth wrote:

get some kevlar fishing line or equivalent
what helps is to make a tapered and very secure joint between the draw cord and the cable, using slippery tape..
But I suspect you know that already.

--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Oh yes. Just not a job I am looking forward to.
On the plus side it's not at height.
--
Adam



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Transit tipper truck seems to get the job done OK:-(
If there is a road breaker compressor on site, I have seen blue poly draw rope pulled in by tying it to the handles of a strong plastic carrier bag and then given a blast of air.
regards

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Aug 2012 19:19:36 +0100, Tim Lamb

Woo hoo! I bet you don't want to get in the way of that!
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But strong enough to pull through some stronger rope?

Quite. But better than nothing. Perhaps you'll have to do it like drilling a large hole - go up in sizes one by one. ;-)
BTW, I don't fancy your chances of *pushing* anything much through corrugated ducting.
--
*I used up all my sick days so I called in dead

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Well the idea is to keep pulling in stronger rope until we have something strong enough to pull the SWA:-)

Not at that distance. For smaller runs the pushing is useful. It takes the weight off the pullers.
--
Adam



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Quite - still have my Westminster draw in tape somewhere. Once as part of every spark's toolkit as a screwdriver.
--
*It is wrong to ever split an infinitive *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You need a "duct motor". Can you hire these?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

Small winch on a truck?
--
Tim Watts

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Watts wrote:

We have apprentices.
--
Adam



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And work a hell of a lot better than nylon cord does too.

And you don't have to fart around with a vacuum cleaner if you use flexible steel instead of string to start with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Aug 2012 12:12:42 +0100 Mike Tomlinson wrote :

Talcum powder?
--
Tony Bryer, Greentram: 'Software to build on',
Melbourne, Australia www.greentram.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/08/2012 12:12, Mike Tomlinson wrote:

Very bad idea. WUL is thickened with common salt, so a corrosive salty layer is left as it dries out. This might or might not attack cable insulation and sheath materials, but it will certainly wreak havoc if it gets onto the conductors.
Use only an approved cable pulling lubricant, such as the already-mentioned 'Yellow 77'.
--
Andy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Any reason why you can't use the string to pull it through? Have I missed something?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am hoping there is a trick I'm missing here, but I suspect the answer will start with "dig it up". Please don't fail me ;-)
Doing our garden, I have buried seven metres of ducting to run cable for a water feature. It is rubbery mains cable, and I need to get it through the ducting. The ducting is 19mm internally, and has a slightly "grippy" feeling to its inside, as does the cable.
Now, I was hoping I could pull the cable down the ducting. No such luck - it gets stuck at the tiniest of curves. I have tried sucking it down with a vacuum, which has been no more successful.
There are no tight bends, just gentle curves. String can be sucked down with a vacuum cleaner without any problems. So, I'm guessing the issue is friction - rubbery plastic against rubbery plastic.
The big question is, is there a lubricant I can add to the cable to get it around the curves? I could dig the trunking up, but if the water feature (a small, sealed pump) ever failed, then I would need to get a new cable down.
I don't want to leap in trying greases, because if I used the wrong one, and it made matters worse, I may be stuck with trunking I can't use at all. The pump cable needs to thread through the base of the water feature first, so the cable could not have been put in before the trunking was installed. *************************************************************************** As suggested earlier, talcum powder works wonders. Also, if you pull string through, why not use that to pull some strong nylon cord through before using this to pull the cable. This is unlikely to snap with a strong tug.
Cheers
Dave R
--
No plan survives contact with the enemy.
[Not even bunny]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David WE Roberts wrote:

As I said, this doesn't sound like metal ducting, and anything else is not legitimate.
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Book/7.13.3.htm
Get some armoured cable in.
http://www.screwfix.com/c/electrical-lighting/armoured-cable/cat830462
--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use what the cable TV installers use a good strong Nylon cord and wrap that around the cable you want to pull so its as "streamlined" as possible, then they do use a silicon spray stuff thats designed for the job and sometimes they are pulling a few hundred metres.
Or if you cant get that a rather dilute washing up liquid can work quite well...
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/08/2012 15:07, tony sayer wrote:

These mesh type pullers are quite good since they pull from the end without tipping the cut end of wire to the side, and they also provide a little "lubrication" at the point of pull by virtue of creating a metal to conduit interface rather than a cable insulation to conduit one.
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/FXSK1115.html
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, August 13, 2012 1:21:15 AM UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

That's a new tool to me. Sounds like a must-have. The problem is usually the cable bending to one side that catches. In the past I have soldered the pull rod (often a springy net curtain wire) to the cable so it is pulled from the middle to avoid this problem. Right, what's my TLC password ...? Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sm_jamieson wrote:

... and what size(s) are you going to order?
looks like it could double-up as an industrial strength Chinese finger trap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.