Gate posts, fence posts & rotting



Which is what I said. Taking the relative times available for commercial treatment (as qucikly as possible) and amateur use (over time) then the approach of putting preservative into a hole whence it can slowly seep makes sense.
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No it isn't on you claim that his suggestion is a good one.
Taking the relative times available for

No it doesn’t. It doesn’t matter how long you wait, without pressure treatment the preservative doesn’t soak into the wood and doesn’t get anywhere near the outside of the post where it is in contact with water. below the ground.
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On 13/05/2015 17:01, gareth wrote:

+1
For the sceptics - if you put preservative in a hole in the middle of the post, where do you think it goes if it doesn't soak into the wood?
Sure, it won't do a good job of protecting the outside of the post - but that will be the bit the 1 minute pressure treatment did. And if the outside rots away leaving a solid core - well, that's better than the outside and the inside rotting...
Andy
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Out the cracks in the wood and just evaporate out of the hole.

Which is the only part of the post that matters decay wise.
- but

That won't happen either.
- well, that's better than the

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Another thing that helps is to put plastic paint cans over the tops of posts. Covers the end grain where they often rot.
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A carved wooden finial looks better and rots in the place of the post.
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I think this would work if you have the patience:-) Telephone poles are routinely dug around and then treated with some chemical preservative.
Look up Boron as a timber preservative.
Some years ago, I noticed what appeared to be large nails hammered into timber electricity poles at ground level. The guy I asked said he thought they were to extend the life of the pole.
--
Tim Lamb

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It's not an alternative to pressure treatment. It's just something you could try when the post's getting a bit old - something to be done on a fine day in between doing other more important DIY jobs.

Not the old ones. I personally know poles that are at least 70 years old, and as far as I know, have never been given any maintenance.

I've never heard of that. Is it possible that something leaches out of the nails if the wood is soaking up water (and therefore more likely to rot)?
--
Ian

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Open Reach parked in my yard a few weeks back to inspect a pole.
As far as I could see this involved digging down 6" round the post, inspecting for rot and then treating with some chemical. I didn't stand over him:-)

--
Tim Lamb

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I just don't believe someone wouldn't have come up with that approach in the centuries we have been doing that if it would work.

Yes, it has happened to mine more than once.

I know mine has, more than once because I have seen it.

Unlikely IMO, otherwise it would be routinely done with new poles.
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writes

You seem to have a very narrow view about unusual DIY suggestions, ie if what is being suggested was any good, we would all be doing it already - and if it's not being done, that proves it doesn't work. Very strange.
--
Ian

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I have in fact suggested some myself, like with how to make sliding doors sound like Star Wars doors if that is what you want to have.

And that is true with something we have been doing for centuries now. If the approach you propose was useful, someone would have tried it and have noticed it works better and said something about that with something as common as fence posts and poles.

Nothing strange about it. The obvious exception is when technology has changed, like with drilling a couple of small holes in failed double glazing. I have never said that that isn't worth doing and it clearly does work when it has been tried. And I have never said that the sort of insulation that harry has done is pointless either, even tho it is a relatively recent approach, now viable because of how cheap decent in insulation has become and how expensive heating houses has become lately.
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On Wednesday, May 13, 2015 at 10:31:44 AM UTC+1, Tim Lamb wrote:

Round here telegraph poles are pressure treated.
About 20 years ago we put a fence around a vegetable garden to keep out the wabbits.
After shooting and eating same wabbits they ceased to be a problem so last year I had occasion to remove the fence. The only posts that hadn't rotted were the few we had used to finish off the job which were standard round fe nce posts as supplied by the forestry people. All the other posts were pres sure treated and survived very well.
IME forget concrete. Dig a hole. Few stones in the bottom and back fill wit h soil well tamped down and more stones if you have them. Most fences are q uite solid in a side to side manner as they gain support from their neighbo urs. Its the to and fro that causes the problems
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writes

snip

In my experience it works very well.
--
Chris Holford

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writes

But did you test it properly and only do that on half the posts and check if the ones you did with the hole lasted a lot longer than the ones you didn’t have the hole in ?
Bet you didn’t.
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writes

I treated the posts on my fence with (old)'Cuprinol'in holes like this; they are still there after 30 years. The fence on the other side of the garden, which is owned by the neighbour and not given this treatment has had to be replaced twice in the same time period.
--
Chris Holford

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writes

But you don’t know what would have happened if you had not done that.
The fence on the other side of the

But you don’t know that the posts were done the same way or with the same wood or treatment before the posts went into the ground.
Plenty who have not done any preservative in holes in the posts have had their fence last for more than 30 years, including me.
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