Garden waste batch incinerator

I have a large garden surrounded by Leylandii and will be removing them on a regular basis, however disposing of the evidence is a problem. The green recycling bin only holds half a tree and is emptied once a fortnight, at that rate it will take me years! Not practical to have a bonfire due to layout of garden, but I was told about a home made batch incinerator by a friend. Simply load the beast up, fasten the lid, light it up and away you go. This is not the same as a regular garden incinerator apparently, but I cannot find anything on the web. Any help appreciated. John
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Will your council give you extra recycling bins free if you ask? Even better would be a dedicated brown bin if your council has a separate collection of compostables.
Owain
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Your brown bin is our green bin :-)) I have asked for extra but they will not agree. Too far to take it to the recycling centre so that option is out as well.
John
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wrote:

No neighbours? I filled about 4 wheelie bins even after shredding it. Don't underestimate the weight of a wheelie bin full of shreddings and expect an oap neighbour to move it after you have filled it.

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On 19 Aug, 10:52, John wrote:

Do you have children who could be taught to weave the branches into wreaths and sell them as christmas decorations?
Alternatively are they far enough from the house you could burn them on the tree, then fell the trunks?
Owain
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No children but I do have neighbours whose garden boundaries mine, don't think they would like me too much if I burned them in situ ;-))))))) (I am not on good terms with them as it is because I keep chickens, but that is another story!!)
The batch incinerator I was described was, according to my friend who I have just phoned, made from an old 45 gallon oil drum with a removable lid/top
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johno wrote:

If you have a large garden, hire a chipper and or a chainsaw, and reduce the small sttuff to shreds and the large stuff to logs.
Pile the logs up and use as firewood, or sell as such..and simply leave the small stuff in a pile, or dig a hole and bury it.
It will compost itself.
I managed to dispose of most of a demolished extension, apart from the good bits that I traded as hard core to a farm, for a ton of stable manure..by digging a large hole and burying it. The garden now has a nice rolling aspect and surprsingly, things grow like mad on top of the buried muck.
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wrote:

As I mentioned in my original post I will be removing them on a regular basis, I don't have the time or energy to do them all in one go. The plan is to remove one or two a week, this would make hiring a shredder/chipper very expensive. I should have pointed out that I am talking about the disposal of the foliage and smaller branches. The larger stuff will be put aside for a later date when we will be reinstating the open fire in the living room. The garden is large but there is no area I would want to bury such a quantity of foliage, I have most of the garden producing food!!
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Buy one, they're cheap enough.
Oh, also consider re-planting leylandii but keeping them in check this time. They make a really good hedge, better than yew IMO. The only things wrong with leylandii are Daily Mail readers, Guardian readers, radio 4 listeners and other assorted fuckwits who consider "Leylandii" to be pronounced "Antichrist". Keep the height down and trim once or twice a year and you will have a tidy, thick barrier against burglars, stray cats and dogs and your hedge will also filter out noise, dust and pollution.
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Steve Firth wrote:

My experience of leylandii was not good. I had them chain sawed last May/June. I did this because holding the hedge trimmer at the hight I wanted to cut them to made my arms ache. The last time I cut them after the spring growth, it took me 2 days to cut, rake up the trimmings and dispose of them. I decided that I was getting too old to keep doing this job.
Another problem I encountered was that the growth of the shoot's thickness prevented me getting the top of the hedge down to the level I wanted, becausde the hedge trimmer did not have a large enough entry gap for the shoots. Many is the time I have had to get out the pruners, or even a bow saw, to cut back the thick shoots. I always trimmed them twice a year, after the growing season, or they would get out of hand.
I'm glad to see the back of them.
Dave
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Err yes, that's because someone let them grow into trees. All hedges have to be kept artificially stunted. Have you seen the size of either beech or yew left to grow wild? Yet people plant beech hedges and yew hedges and manage to keep them in check.
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I was 15 years younger when I planted my hedges. Anytime you are up in Hertfordshire I'll oil up the hedge trimmer in readiness:-)
Done once this year and ready for a tidy up now.
regards

--
Tim Lamb

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I've got a Leylandii hedge that I planted at the front of the house fifteen years ago. It's five foot high over most of run with sections by the gate that are seven feet high. Passers by think it's yew - the neighbour has a yew hedge it was planted thirty years ago and it's nowhere near as compact as the Leylandii. Presumable if we sell up and move on the next person in will not trim the hedge and then act astounded when there are 30ft high trees in the front garden.

That's all it seems to take. I was thinking of getting one of those hedge hoover things advertised on TV just to give the hedge the light trim it needs each year.
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I managed to resurrect one like that. It takes dedication. I climbed inside it with a chainsaw in hand and cut the trunks down to about 2ft then cut the inside of what was lef to a "V" parallel to the lin of the hedge to allow light into the centre. Then I kept the tops down to something reasonable. I also fertilised it with a high-nitrogen fertiliser, watered it and spent lots of TLC on it. After five years it was back to a decent hedge. I drive past that house from time to time and the current owners have looked after it well. It looks as good as the one outside this house now.
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John wrote:

If you're only going to be burning the smaller stuff, you could probably get yourself a small shredder that will manage what you would otherwise burn. Once shredded, it makes very good mulch/weed suppressor or it can be added to compost heaps.
We got a 2nd hand AL-KO shredder on ebay for about 80 that's seen us well for several years.
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wrote:

As I mentioned in my original post I will be removing them on a regular basis, I don't have the time or energy to do them all in one go. The plan is to remove one or two a week, this would make hiring a shredder/chipper very expensive. I should have pointed out that I am talking about the disposal of the foliage and smaller branches. The larger stuff will be put aside for a later date when we will be reinstating the open fire in the living room. The garden is large but there is no area I would want to bury such a quantity of foliage, I have most of the garden producing food!!
Leyland produce a sticky soot residue that will catch fire up the flue if used excessively. So watch out.
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Saw to 18" or so, then quarter with a splitting wedge or a "log grenade" (these are great for bulk Leylandii). Split one into 1" sticks for kindling, or use the brash.
Burn them in a "guarded" incinerator. It doesn't need to be a sealed box, but it should have some sort of cage to guard against exploding logs. Leylandii is highly resinous and burns ferociously (search back for the E-type Jag story). Load up one log at a time and expect fireworks and sparks. If burning Leylandii in a sealed woodstove, the gases it evolves are flammable. Watch for flare-ups if you open the lid and suddenly allow air in there.
Personally I'd regard this stuff as useful fuel and horde it for camping bonfires (sitting well back!). Most of my camping partners are hippy foresters anyway. If you have to buy something to destroy it, a thin steel dustbin with a chimney is adequate and cheap.
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Yes - I wouldn't recommend it for any form household burning. It is too resinous and consequently flares up/ explodes, plus is likely to deposit tars on the flue.with the hazard of a blocked flue or chimney fire.
If most of your garden is producing food, then there will be areas which have been harvested and will surely be able to take a bonfire. I grow a lot of vegetables too with an area totaling about 25m x 40m under cultivation and always manage the ground in such a way that there is space for a bonfire particularly from now onwards.
Rob
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johno wrote:

What's wrong with something like: <
http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/image/s_garden-incinerator.jpg
Not sure what the 'batch' aspect is to what you're seeking (unless it's very much larger, which may be the disadvantage of the above)
David
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As I was explained by a friend a batch incinerator is very similar to a standard garden incinerator, but larger and burns much hotter due to its design, you load it up via the top (pack it tight) replace and secure the lid/chimney and light via a hole at the base. Stand back and watch it go! apparently it burns very hot and produces very little smoke. Looks like a standard garden item will be the way to go and for the larger stuff a habitat pile; sounds too iffy for burning indoors ;-)))
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