Fixings for a soft wall

Hi all
Came home tonight to find my 4 year old had managed to pull our front room
curtains down, apparently she was just hiding behind them when the rod,
fixings and all just lept from the wall - hmmm
I've had a look at the damage and no big deal to patch up the plaster etc,
but the material the brackets were screwed into is very soft and crumbly.
Not sure what it is but a poke with a screwdriver easily gouges it.
What's the best sort of fixing to use in this material to try and make the
arrangement a little more child proof ! Had a quick look on the Screwfix
site and thinking injection resin may be the way to go but is there anything
better. (If resin is the way to go how do you use it, should I repair the
area with plaster, drill new holes, inject and screw or do I still use
rawlplugs etc)
Thanks
Jim
Reply to
Jim
This may be a tad stupid but I'm not sure if there is any brickwork back there. The soft material could be what I would call breeze block but last time I handled one of those I don't remember it being this soft.
Reply to
Jim
Sounds like aircrete (does it look like an Aero made of grey crumbly sandy cement?) or lightweight block.
Gouge out the hole to make a cone shape (bigger further inside the block than at the face) and fill it full of something like a decent filler, whatever it is is likely to be stronger than the block material so it isn't critical. The cone shape will increase the pull- out resistance of the filler 'plug'. Then drill, rawlplug and screw.
Reply to
boltmail
Probably a thermal insulation "aircrete" block of some form - commonly used on newer properties for the internal leaf of a cavity wall. Only slightly more robust than a wetabix!
Longer fixings with a suitable soft block rawl plug may do it. Resin has a fairly good chance of working. Packing the rawlplug in with car body filler may also do it.
Reply to
John Rumm
In article , snipped-for-privacy@home.com says...
I use foaming polyurethane glue for this sort of thing.
Fix the holes, drill new ones and then get the hole wet and dip the wallplug in PU glue and shove it in. I've never had one come out after doing that.
Reply to
Skipweasel
Thanks to all for replying
Got plenty of car filler in the garage, so think I'll give it a go using that
Cheers
Jim
Reply to
Jim
Make bigger holes where the old fixings were, hoover the dust out, fill, and drill new holes. I do the filling in 2 stages. One to line the hole and get a grip on the plaster, and two to get it reasonably flush with the wall. Best to have 2" of screw thread in the wall for curtain rails. Next time she'll be that much stronger :-)
Reply to
Stuart Noble
I would not fix the brackets to the wall at all
Fix a 2 x 1 softwood batten to the wall by any of the means suggested above
Or use the special aircrete plugs (not brilliant but better than ordinary ones) with decent length screws
Belt and braces would add some no more nails to the back of the batten
Then fix the rail to the batten
Tony
Reply to
TMC
Always more work than it sounds by the time you've painted the batten etc. Useful where there's a lintel involved, but it can look a bit naff depending on the window frame design.
Reply to
Stuart Noble
In article , stuart snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com says...
Over the years I've removed the battens from this house 'cos they're ugly. The blinds/curtains fit straight to the wall.
Reply to
Skipweasel
This is ludicrus,if you have not got a sound firm fixing then no amount of filler will stay in place.
Reply to
George
Injection fixing is a very good method for this.
I had need to fix the frame for a wall mounted toilet recently to a soft block wall. Admittedly most of the weight is downwards onto the floor fixings of the frame, but there is still some force tending to pull the frame away from the wall.
Resin fixings with studs worked very well with this.
I have also used the resin with plastic wall plugs having barbs for fixing the identical problem to yours.
The important thing is to clean the holes carefully with a jet of air or a vacuum cleaner.
Reply to
Andy Hall
Im summizing these curtains are over a bay window? if so on some if not all there is no brickwork and the cavity has four or five blocks of 2x2 batens which had affixed to them wood slats like those you find on victorian ceilings. The plaster was pushed into the slats so as to get a firm grip.
Any sign of slats?
Reply to
George
Is he a Greek god of some sort?
if you have not got a sound firm fixing then no amount of
As long as there's something solid somewhere in the hole, car body filler will stick to it, and you only have to wait 5 minutes to find out if it has worked.
Reply to
Stuart Noble

Site Timeline Threads

  • Soooooo since no one is mentioning building something I'll mention the POS I...
  • site's last updated in

    Woodworking

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.