First car recommendations?

On 23/02/12 23:38, gremlin_95 wrote:

My 18 year old Twingo went to the scrapyard last month after more than 150,000 miles. Mechanically fine but the cost of the welding neded to pass the MOT meant evn I had to accept it was uneconomic. Replaced with a Citroën C2, which is probably more frugal on fuel, but is slightly larger outside, much smaller inside and has a poorer power to weight ration.
At least cars these days don't rust as much as they used to the Renault 5 I had from new in the late 70's had visible rust after just five years.
My advice would be that high mileage is ok provided it has been used for long steady journeys rather that in-town start-stop, and a few minor dents, so long as they don't rust, are part of the character.
But you probably need to start by looking at insurance quotes. Quotes for the C2, which is supposed to be group 1 etc for a 57 year with 15+ years NCD etc ranged from £300 to over £1200. As a young driver, insurance may cost you more than the car.
--
djc


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Next question is "What's your budget?"
Diesel generally take mileage better than petrol and don't figure highly in the boy-racer stakes. Ford did a Focus Ghia diesel early on. Also Renault did a 1.9 n/a. I would also start looking at insurance quotes for various models.
--
hugh

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gremlin_95 wrote:

Probably not enough miles per year to justify a diesel especially if the insurance premium is higher for a diesel.
You are probably going to have to use a 1000cc petrol car for at least the first year.
--
Adam



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On 23/02/2012 22:34, gremlin_95 wrote:

You're going to have to try each and find the 'sweet spot'. Or talk to locals/people at work. I mix it up depending on my mood, or take the bus. But then I'm lucky enough to have a choice. Your time will come :-)

Er - more like 20,000. Fuel is going to be your biggest hit - so I'd be looking at an old but maintained diesel. Even then your fuel bill is going to be at least 50 per week. Insurance for a new young driver - 40 per week?
Have a word with the employer - they may let you use a pool car/van so long as it's in the pool 9-5 and you use it for commuting only. I did that for my first traineeship - it means nothing to them. You just have to make it sound as though it's good for business. Promise to valet it weekly for them :-)
Or maybe move? A room can be had in most towns for 50 inc. I expect.
Really well done on getting the apprenticeship by the way - great achievement. Don't mean to put you off.
Rob
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On 24/02/2012 08:25, Rob wrote:

Commuting in a company van isn't a taxable benefit. So better still.
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If you're under 25, I would start by looking for insurance you can afford. That might be as far as you get.
If you can negotiate a company car (even in exchange for a large reduction in wages), that might also work out much cheaper.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On Thu, 23 Feb 2012 21:48:33 +0000 (UTC) snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

On an apprenticeship? That would be, um, unlikely.
--
Davey.

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On 23/02/2012 22:17, Davey wrote:

They do have company cars at the place and any employees with a license can drive them if required at work but IIRC you aren't given one till you have been working there for a long time.
--
David


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Top, car insurance group listings are available.

I think the tax on benefits in kind associated with company car provision far outweigh any saving achieved, that was certainly the case when I made choices on such matters.
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
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On 23/02/2012 22:43, fred wrote:

Taxable benefits don't take into account the insurance premium for a teenager, so might be a cost effective solution.
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That was my thinking. ~15 years ago, I was working with lots of young computer programmers (although mostly older than 25), and anyone interested in a sporty car took the company car option, because you would never be able to afford the insurance yourself. OTOH, if you just wanted a Ford Fiesta, it was cheaper not to use the company car option.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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I think it was about 15yrs ago that the rules changed to base the hmrc benefit on a proportion of the new value of the car you chose. I think it was about a third of the new price each year (w/o any allowance for depreciation) so if you had an 18k car you had a benefit loading of 6k per year, every year that you had the benefit. Same thing if you bought a 5yo car that cost 18k new, you got hit with a benefit of 6k no matter what the age. For those who had a choice, coy cars went out of vogue in short order.
I switched to personal ownership plus mileage.
--
fred
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On 23/02/2012 23:02, Fredxx wrote:

+1. About 20 times.
Insurance at that age is likely to be more than the cost of the car. Think thousands. Possibly up to 4K.
If you can get a company vehicle out of them do it. Anything! Take a pay cut. Heck, go for minimum wage!
Now (puts on Dad hat) remember that the other driver is out to kill you. Not all of them, not even most of them, but a few of them. Like the one who hit my son - he went through the green light on the pedestrian crossing, and thought it meant he could drive straight onto the roundabout 50 yards later. I'd probably have dodged, my son with limited experience didn't. It moved a suspension tower and wrote the car off. Luckily he now has a company car...
Andy
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wrote:

I think it rather unlikely that a brand new apprentice would be given a company car :-)
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Frank Erskine

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On Thu, 23 Feb 2012 21:48:33 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Gabriel wrote:

WHS. Putting two and two togther (gremlin_95 & apprenticeship) we might be looking at a 17 year old. Half saw on the telly the other night possibly Superscrimpers that if a youngster adds an older person as a named driver to their insurance the premium drops.
Maybe worth looking at the policies that fit a box to the car and monitor how well (or not), when and where you drive and adjust the premium accordingly.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 23/02/2012 22:49, Dave Liquorice wrote:

My brother was a named driver for his first car (Nissan Micra 1.4 SE+ which is now sold), it definitely made it cheaper.
About the box fitted to the car, my instructor was telling me it can be cheaper but if I was to drive after 000 - 0500* I could get a fine, there are also other limitations.
* Whilst this shouldn't affect me too much, it is possible I will be doing some very early starts - mostly for when I do the on-site part of the apprenticeship for a few months.
--
David


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On Thu, 23 Feb 2012 23:32:44 +0000, gremlin_95 wrote:

That's why a said "look at", ie. read the small print.
Strikes me as a bit harsh to be fined for using the car between midnight and 0500, an adjustment to the premium, if regular, I could understand but not for a single "out of pattern" use in that period.
Also be aware of barrack room lawyers, take anything anybody says with a pinch of salt unless you already know that what they are saying is correct or that you know they have real direct expertise in that field, even then be wary.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 23/02/2012 23:57, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Indeed, I have had a look now some companies offering this, one company says:
Time Categories:
Are divided into: Peak Off peak Super Peak this will only apply to all mileage driven during these times, where a driver under the age of 23 years is named on the policy or listed as the policyholder.
Please refer to your schedule for the time categories that have been allocated to your policy.
Difficult to find on some others, though you are allocated 6000 miles a year with another company, you have to buy extra miles if needed!
--
David


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On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 00:43:20 +0000, gremlin_95 wrote:

Sorry to preach(*). But the number of people who take what they hear, see or read from the people media or the 'net as absolute is depressingly high.

So you can't find out what the time periods are before you hand over your dosh? HTF are you supposed to make a buying decision?

Seems a bit stingey, 6000 miles is only a 25 mile daily commute (48 week year, 4 weeks hols).
(*) Don't start me on pensions. I know that a pension is in the far far distant future but money shoved in now can grow for 40+ years. If there is still a state retirement age (or indeed a state pension) by the time you get there it may well be 70 or 75, that's well over 50+ years... If you can afford 10/month now (the cost of just a few pints) it will be money well used. Get advice from an *independant* Financial Advisor as to the best place to put it. I don't know if a pension fund or a stocks and shares ISA both with a "cautious/balanced" spread of investments would be best. With the ISA you can still get at the funds, not so easy to get at the money in a pension fund, nothing to stop you moving money from an ISA to a pension in 10 - 20 years time.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 24/02/2012 09:19, Dave Liquorice wrote: ...

I would wholeheartedly agree. I started my first pension scheme at age 19, after working out what the state pension would buy. That is one of the reasons I now have a pension that many people would be happy to have as a salary.

I would suggest putting a small proportion into higher risk investments. Given a good enough spread, which your advisor should arrange, the gains will outweigh the losses. I put 10% of one pension fund into a high risk investment fund. Over 10 years it averaged 17% growth, which was considerably more than anything else offered. The funds that worked actually achieved 25% growth, but that was reduced by the losses. Note: this is not an option for anyone who frightens easily or who does not realise that you need to take a very long term view of pensions investments.

There is something to be said for not being able to get at your pension fund, even in times of need.
Colin Bignell
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