Fire escape ladders/ropes/descenders/ ...

snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Contact your local fire and rescue and ask them to pop round and offer advice. They will do and I think it is free.
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On 05/07/2019 09:06, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

AS advertised on Farcebook recently
https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v "8803037996600
Personally I cannot see too many problems except...
The demo assumes no up-draft from a fire - nor as a result of prevailing winds hitting the building.
You are parachuted through a cladding fire - I hope all components are fire proof.
It may work for one individual but for many using similar at the same time?
--
mailto : news admac myzen co uk

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On 05/07/2019 11:58, alan_m wrote:

Hmmm, that's almost base jumping. It might be OK from a tall building but not from the 1st floor. If I was young again then kite surfing and base jumping would be on the "must do" list - I'm not going to be young again so I'm safe saying that ;-)
Here's a base jump from Angel falls, skip to the action at 50 seconds:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1tBfSsbmPI

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wrote:

And assumes that the parachute doesn’t snag on anything on the way down. Not keen on being hung up half way down with the flames coming up from below.

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snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com was thinking very hard :

A self closing fire door or doors, on bedrooms, seem the only sensible answer, combined with a linked fire alarm system. Then await the fire brigades arrival for rescue.
I have double plaster boarded ceilings to ground floor, linked fire alarms and one (unused) bedroom at the rear with a fire door.
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On 05/07/2019 12:26, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

It's the door at the bottom of the stairs that needs to be a fire door, and closed when you go to bed, so you have a safe exit route down to your front door.
If that is not possible then the kitchen needs to be a fire compartment in its own right so it can be isolated easily.
And don't forget fire and smoke hoods on downlighters else your double-layer ceilings are pointless.
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Andrew formulated the question :

I don't have a door at the bottom, the hall/ stair is open, connecting living room and kitchens with their own doors.
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On 05/07/2019 16:43, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

That would worry me.
Can you still completely shut off the kitchen from the rest of the house ?. If so I would make an effort to keep that door shut at night.
A smoke detector at the bottom of the stairs (plus elsewhere) will warn you the moment any smoke starts to come up the stairs, but tbh, the best escape route is down an enclosed staircase and straight out of the front door, especially when you are no longer 'agile'.
Commercial and other public buildings sometimes have fire curtains, like non-flammable roller blinds that drop down to stop smoke and hot gases from travelling up stairwells and the like, where physical fire doors are not possible.
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After serious thinking Andrew wrote :

I could close the kitchen door, but I don't because I have two dogs who may need access to their water in the kitchen. I have smoke detectors in the hall, landing and the enclosed loft - all linked, so if one is triggered, they all sound.

I am still pretty agile.
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On Fri, 5 Jul 2019 09:06:44 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Have you considered an inflatable slide, like the emergency evacuation slides from aircraft? I don't know if they're available for domestic situations, nor if they're fireproof, nor how much space they occupy folded up, but perhaps worth a thought.
--

Chris

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On 05/07/2019 09:06, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Bungalow ?.
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On 05/07/2019 14:12, Andrew wrote:

Helter skelter?
--
Truth welcomes investigation because truth knows investigation will lead
to converts. It is deception that uses all the other techniques.
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On Fri, 5 Jul 2019 09:06:44 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

The aim is to get out (and stay out). Forget ropes. ladders parachutes and rocket packs etc. The safest way to get out is by a using a familiar direct obstacle free and illuminated route.
As others have said the immediate danger is fumes, not flames.
Fit linked smoke alarms (so if one goes off they all do), temperature triggered in the kitchen, optical in the living room and hall and (the most important one) on the ceiling of the first floor above the stairs.
These will trigger before a fire has a chance to develop and give you several minutes at least to get out.
Don't use high power devices like dishwashers, tumble dryers or washing machines overnight. If any occupants smoke stop them.
For the front and back doors make sure you can open them from inside without having to use a key. If you are a bit paranoid fit a very low power LED bulb (5W is more than enough) in a light fitting and turn it on at night so that you always have light at the foot of the stairs.
Make sure you have a simple hard wired telephone extension (not one that requires power) in the hall by the front door. Put it on a long enough lead so you can use it from the door position or just outside. Do not rely on a DECT (cordless) phone as it stops working if power fails.
Have a drill so each night you check fires are off in the lounge, cooker and hob are off, close the kitchen, dining room and lounge doors so no downstairs room has open access to the hall and stairs. Switch on the hall light.
If a smoke alarm sounds, get out and call the fire service from the hall extension by the front door if safe to do so. (a wired phone is always better than a mobile as it shows your location to the fire service operator). Don't try to go back in.
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On Friday, 5 July 2019 09:06:48 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Think about smoke hoods.
https://firemask.co.uk/shop/?gclid=CjwKCAjw6vvoBRBtEiwAZq-T1Seq0Qnxg57xVbWO_mvjR7yk5x4SMdn0XegYUnrC4BU9LSGzCHVJkhoCnRcQAvD_BwE
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On Friday, 5 July 2019 09:06:48 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Battery operated automatic emergency lights in case of power failure leaving you in the dark
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On Fri, 5 Jul 2019 10:17:02 -0700 (PDT), harry wrote:

Might not be overly effective if fitted to ceilings with thick smoke building up at that level.
Useful for power failures without a fire though. I've one in the boiler room where the main CU is and one above one of sets of stairs. TBH the latter, though useful, is not really in a good location as far as being able to see to move about is concerned.
--
Cheers
Dave.
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On 05/07/2019 09:06, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Smoke alarms, heat alarms should give you plenty of time to get out the doors.
Don't forget that firemen search wardrobes for kids that hid from a fire and behind doors for adults that didn't remember the keys to open the door.
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dennis@home laid this down on his screen :

I leave keys inside both back and front doors.
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laid this down on his screen :

I keep all my keys (front/back door, car) on a keyring that is always in my trouser pocket, together with my wallet and mobile phone, with my trousers close at hand at night. The reason I keep my keys on/near me is mainly so I don't lose them by absent-mindedly putting them down "somewhere"; the benefit for emergency situations is a bonus.
Hopefully in an emergency I'd either put my trousers on (if there was time) or at least grab them, and so have the means to open doors, call the emergency services, and move my car if that would make it easier for emergency vehicles (or if it put it out of range of the fire setting the fuel tank on fire, making a small fire bigger).
At least I wouldn't be faffing around trying to remember where each set of keys were.
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laid this down on his screen :

Wouldn't work for me, I have a snooze almost every day and it would be a damned nuisance to have to take my jeans off every time I do that.

I fix that problem by always putting the keys and wallet in the same place every time, in a pile of bins intended for sheets of paper which sits beside the main chair that I spend most of the day in when not actually doing something around the house or yard.

All my 13 patio doors, don't need a key to get out thru. 5 in the main room one in each bedroom and 2 in the main bedroom and what you lot call a bungalow with not even any steps outside.

My next door neighbour, when the house on the other side of his to mine, was deliberately torched by a rabid loony in the middle of the might, went out in his undies when the house went up with one hell of a bang because the loony had poured lots of petrol around inside the house and then tossed in something she had lit, a rag or something.

I just have the one bunch of keys and don't need any key to get out of the house.
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