fein supercut / oscillating cutters

I want an oscillating cutter, like the fein supercut. It seems to be the best way of cutting out nailed-down floorboards. Yes I've tried the other methods. Circular saw gashes the next board, cut-off hacksaw method is frankly, crap, and does not cut all the way through cleanly, etc. The fein mulitmaster has this capability but is a bit feeble, the fein supercut is more like it but costs over 250 quid. Now, the basic mechanics is not particularly revolutionary (no pun, etc). So is there any alternative at a more reasonable cost ? Simon.
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sm_jamieson wrote:

There's an alternative *way*, dunno about the tool you mention.
Make sure the blade of your jigsaw is as far "out" as it will go. Then stand the saw on its nose, pointing across the board, with the tip of the blade touching the floorboard to one side of the one you want to cut. Start sawing, on slowest speed; when a "start" has been made, up the speed a little, and plunge the saw blade into the board, slowly. When you've reached the desired angle[1], drag the saw across the board, maintaining angle, 'till you nearly cut into the next board. Stop cutting, turn the saw around, repeat performance to finish the cut.
Gauge the angle by standing the nose of the saw on something the same thickness as the board you want to cut first, and setting the blade to the bottom of the thing.
This works well (except hard up against a wall!) and doesn't strain your saw, or cut adjacent boards.
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Chris Bacon wrote:

Actually its easier to use a small circular saw in the plank center to start the cut, then the jigsaw to each extremity...
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I'm surprised you find the multimaster feeble - I use mine for exactly what you describe, particularly to start/finish cuts across floorboards (particularly above joists) done with a jigsaw or circular saw. The downside of the fein tools is the blades are very expensive and easy to trash on nails - but otherwise the machine itself is superbly tough and well built - I would say the multimaster is easily up to the job. It's also one of those tools that once you have one, you find new uses for it.
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snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote:

Sorry, I've never actually used one ! I just looked at the fein tools, and saw the supercut at 4 times the power of the multimaster, and presumed ... What price can you get the multimaster for ? Simon.
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I bought mine at a trade show (you know those stands best avoided - chap does a superb sales pitch on a crap tool and sucks in the mugs - but this one really was superb!). If you can get to a trade show where you can try one (and haggle for some freebies!), that's your best bet (I guess it is a tool that is hard to sell without a trial/demo). Otherwise http://www.axminster.co.uk sells them, although I doubt they are the cheapest.
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 13:46:42 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote

I'd agree.
The Multimaster is among the best tools I've bought and gets used a great deal for anything like this, through to profile sanding, scraping, etc. etc.
I've never found any power issues. This is probably because the amount of movement is very small in comparison with typical devices like saws. A large amount of oomph can be delivered with a comparatively small motor. Don't think of this in the same league as a Dremel - it's a long way from that.
There are different package options available. I bought the "Top" package because it had a lot of the cutters I wanted plus a metal case at less than the sum of the pieces. Axminster has this for 169. There's an entry level pack for 111 and another in between.
Worth every penny, IMO,
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Andy Hall wrote:

I would have to agree here, I also bought a Top package a while ago, and power really is a non issue here. It seems to have plenty for anything I have tried with it.

I did look about, and would have been able to get one for perhaps 7 less on ebay, but decided this is one of those cases I would rather have the peace of mind getting it from Axminster.
--
Cheers,

John.

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wrote:

Same price everywhere, IMHE. The Multimaster Top kit (160 something) is the best deal, as the basic machine isn't as expensive as the blades are and the kit is a good saving.
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If the broken jigsaw blade doesn't cut all the way through cleanly, you're not doing it right. I've done hundreds of boards this way. Not that I wouldn't be interested in a better method that doesn't cost the earth.
--
*Honk if you love peace and quiet.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I must be doing it wrong. Can someone give a detailed description of how to do it. I know the earlier post gives some info. I drilled a hole big enought for the blade and tried to cut with the faceplate flat, and the broken blade would either hit the hoist, or not cut all the way through. Simon.
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sm_jamieson wrote:

The reason I don't like the "broken blade" approach is that it can strain your tool (ooh-er!). I had a Bosh jigsaw that chipped some gear teeth possibly because of doing this sort of thing. Maybe grinding the blade to a narrow taper would help.
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wrote:

Hi,
I just blip the trigger so the blade stops on the max downstroke, then mark on the blade the depth of the board from the soleplate of the saw.
I then cut the blade flush with this point with a grinder, and grind the back of the blade so it has a 45 point.
It helps to have the saw on pendulum when cutting too, worth practising on scrap to get the right setting and techique.
Alternatively a rotozip should be able to cut a board OK, though the cut is 1/8" wide.
cheers, Pete.
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With the blade fitted to the jigsaw, pull it out (down) as far as it will go. Place the jigsaw on the edge of a board you've already lifted with the blade 'hanging' down the side and mark the blade to the thickness of the board. Remove the blade and snap off the waste in a vice - or with a couple of pairs of pliers, etc.
You don't need to make a hole in the board. Most jigsaws have a curved face on the bed plate. Start the jigsaw with the shortened blade near horizontal and *gradually* but firmly pivot the saw down so the blade starts to cut - you can do this anywhere on the cut line. Don't be scared of it - it won't bite. Cut to the end of the line and if necessary turn the saw round and go to the other edge. Keep firm downward pressure at all times - and saw round any nails. ;-)
Of course if you have stripped floors this doesn't produce as nice a cut as you might want - but it's fine for boards which are to be covered up.
--
*Why are a wise man and a wise guy opposites?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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. Yes I've tried the

I find it difficult to break-off a blade at exactly the right length. I find it easier to put some packing underneath the saw soleplate, to raise the blade to just the right height. Never had any problem doing it this way.
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