Extremely poor quality home insulation

From a report on BBC Radio 4 Today program this morning, it seems that (if I heard correctly) some 800,000 homes which were insulated for free by the energy companies in last 10 years have been done so badly, the insulation needs to be removed. These are homes which had cavity wall insulation installed, or external insulation panels installed and rendered. This also applies to some homes insulated more recently under the Green Deal scheme, where the owner pays through increased fuel prices for 20 years.
On one council estate in Preston, Ofgem recently ordered the energy supplier to pay £1.2M to fix the first 60 homes, and there are 300 more to do.
Another estate paid for by SSE has 250 homes which need rectifying. At the moment, SSE is pointing to the contractor, but they've gone bust. The workmanship is apparently terrible.
BRE said they have inspected 2000 homes across the country which had insulation installed, and none passed.
The BBC interviewed one of the installers. He said they knew there was no oversight and none of their work would be inspected.
So, we all paid for this through higher fuel prices, and I guess someone is going to have to pay to undo it all (which is much more than the installation cost).
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On 09/11/2018 13:45, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

BRE have been warning about this for years.
But I suppose it'll be good for employment - including in all those claims management companies who'll have something to cold call us about when PPI claims end :(
--
Robin
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On 09/11/2018 13:53, Robin wrote:

The Energy Saving Trust still think it is ok to insulate a flat roof by simply adding rigid board insulation on top the existing roof covering !.
No mention of whether it is a warm or cold roof construction.
I have complained to them in the past about this awful advice but they never replied or corrected their website.
Some cack-handed roofers think it is ok to do this and simply block up the cross ventilation, while the more clueless variety just leave it with cold air freely blowing under the supposedly warm side of the insulation.
http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/home-insulation/roof-and-loft
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On Friday, 9 November 2018 13:45:18 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

yet again I'm grateful to diy
NT
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On Fri, 09 Nov 2018 05:58:14 -0800, tabbypurr wrote:

Unfortunately, when grants are involved, you get what you are given.
No reason why you couldn't have a system whereby homeowners apply to do the work themselves with an inspection and liability for any work needed to bring up to snuff. But that would divert money away from the trouser pockets of those that dreamt up the scheme.
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On 09/11/2018 14:19, Jethro_uk wrote:

Yes. Some years ago I looked at converting my car to use LPG. The price for doing so was around £900-£1000. There was a government grant available at the time of about £300, but you could only use the companies signed up to the government scheme to have the work done - and all their prices were £1200 and upwards!
As all installers needed to be approved to do such work, why couldn't the goverment have just given a grant that could have been used with any installer? Better yet, still have given the grant for a self-install, followed by an inspection and sign-off.
Similar uplifts have applied to boiler replacement schemes over the years.
SteveW
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On Fri, 09 Nov 2018 22:25:09 +0000, Steve Walker wrote:

Because the "right" people have to get the money. At which point you know it's a scam.
Just reading a headline today that it turns out shows hybrid vehicles bought for fleets with *our* money have never been plugged in. They've only been driven on fuel.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46152853
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On 09/11/2018 13:58, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I am not sure that pumping foam into a cavity wall is really a DIY job. Where I am at the moment I was advised not to have cavity wall insulation. Like ours, most property walls are rendered I presume to protect them against driving rain.
--
Michael Chare

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On 09/11/2018 16:14, Michael Chare wrote:

Apart from which making holes in the render, which will never be made weatherproof again, allows driving rain inside the cavity.
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On Friday, 9 November 2018 16:28:16 UTC, Andrew wrote:

ms that

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I diyed CWI using polystyrene. My memory may be amiss but ISTR foam require d hiring equipment to do.

to

It may be worth checking the wall construction, they often don't give corre ct advice due to not checking it.
If there's a chance the insulation might need to be removed, go with polyst yrene bead without glue. It makes removal a very easy diy job.

DIYers don't need to replicate such bodges. Instead of damaging brick/stone s & messing up render we can drill the holes on the interior, fill & decora te.
NT
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On 09/11/2018 16:46, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How would you remove it?
--
Michael Chare

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On 09/11/2018 18:08, Michael Chare wrote:

Just remove a brick at DPC level and it all pours out.
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On Friday, 9 November 2018 18:25:18 UTC, Andrew wrote:

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apply a hoover too.
NT
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It’s not that large , they did some bungalows here in the village a few weeks back an being a nosy I sod I kept an eye on how they proceeded. They worked in 3 stages with a four man team. Stage one Drilled regular 25 mm holes approx 4ft apart horizontally and 3ft vertically . On the first course of bricks above the damp course they chiselled a brick out on each corner and a couple more along the length and width. Second stage large but not excessively so vacuum inserted into the brick apertures while simultaneously a compressed air jet nozzle was inserted into the holes which the operator wiggled and loosened the fibre insulation down towards the removed bricks. One of the team was checking progress regularly using an Endoscope and I understand that the image was recorded so could be checked by others. They when happy then stuffed the 25 mm holes with a twist of insulation and made good the brick apertures. They proceeded at the rate of two properties a day. The removed insulation was emptied from the vacuum cleaners filter bag into clear plastic sacks for disposal which was one reason I took an interest, I scrounged some sacks as I intend to insulate my wooden shed by using the pond vac to blow it in between the inner and outer wooden skins, if that proves awkward then it will be used in the garden as our soil is fairly sandy and dries quickly, Mixing mineral wool into such a soil by adding to compost allegedly helps . I ‘m not convinced enough to pay for any but seeing a free source it is worth experimenting. The insulation I have is clean and dry but apparently this hasn’t always been the case so it is a blanket contract.
3 rd stage was for another team to come along a few days later remove the twists of old insulation in the hole and reinsulate using the bead material and the drilled holes then sealed with cement but having got my scrounged material by then I did not take as much interest.
GH
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On Sunday, 11 November 2018 11:59:53 UTC, Marland wrote:
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Polystyrene bead is easier, just need hoover & holes at the bottom, plus if you need to be thorough blow some air in. Hoover can be any size of course , large just makes the job quicker. The fastest option has 2 sections, clot h to let the air out then your storage bag for the beads. You don't want hi gh hoover suction if you're connecting binbags to that :) I used a handheld one to do CWI with beads, 500w IIRC.
Bead is not the best of the insulators, but it's by far the easiest to fill and to remove, and that makes it good for walls that most would not want t o CWI due to damp risk.
NT
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On 09/11/2018 16:28, Andrew wrote:

Those are filled .
--
It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.
Mark Twain
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The Natural Philosopher explained on 10/11/2018 :

When our (plain brick faced) house was done probably more than a decade ago, they drilled tiny holes in the mortar joints every metre on all cavity walls. A lance was inserted then the insulation blown in through every hole. Once completed the holes were sealed with some sort of rough plastic compound.
Generally we have had no damp issues at all, apart from a small problem at the base of an internal partition wall. That seems to be the plaster bridging the damp course in a tiny area at the back of a downstairs toilet.
The insulation made a very noticeable difference to the heating bill, the house has no cold spots and heat is retained for very much longer - I know this to be true, my weather station records and plots internal plus external temperatures every minute.
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I was at my parents' place when theirs was done, maybe 5 years ago. They mortared the holes, and went to some effort to match the mortar colour. However, part of the house is painted render, and I was even more impressed that they mixed up render to match, and there's no colour difference. Indeed you can only see where the holes were if you look very carefully, and that's because they haven't quite perfectly matched the rough texture surrounding the hole. They also went around all the air bricks checking none were blocked. A few were, and they removed them, and inserted a giant hedgehog like brush into the cavity above them, and fitted new ones.
I was really impressed with the workmanship, and there were no subsequent problems.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On 10/11/2018 07:49, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

By stuffing a gob of very weak mix, unmatched sand/cement into the hole.
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wrote:

Still weatherproof.
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