Extension leads, external wiring, Part P etc.

Hi,
just contemplating the hassle I have at the moment running power to the detached garage on the few occasions when I need it.
I have to run an extension lead out through the patio door (which will then not quite close) and across the lawn/path to the garage.
Having just run some co-ax through the wall as part of a satellite installation, I thought "Why can't I do that with an extension lead - take the plug off, run the cable through the wall, put the plug back on and then run the lead into the garage?"
I could then refit the plug, and plug the lead into a socket and switch on whenever I needed power.
Granted that I would have to do a similar thing at the other end to be able to shut the garage door.
Is this a valid thing to do as it will be a lead with a plug at one end and a socket at the other just like a normal extension lead, just run through a couple of walls?
Cheers
Dave R
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A neater way to deal with the house end that I've done is this: Remove a double socket on the inside of the wall that you want the cable to go through. Drill through the wall behind the socket and fit an IP66 socket ( http://www.screwfix.com/prods/10562 ) on the outside wall. You can then use 2 wires through the wall to the outside socket to make it part of the ring, or one wire to make it a spur from the existing socket.
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I'd check on the rcd requirements first though - try the DIY Wiki
Rob
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wrote:

I thought that fitting external sockets to an internal ring might fall foul of Part P.
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Well don't tell anyone then.
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Part P was devised by idiots, approved by idiots and followed by idiots!
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Sounds like a good manifesto for a certain political party ..... <:o(
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David WE Roberts wrote:

Not a good way to go - extension leads are not really intended for semi permanent installation like that. There is more chance it will get damaged if always left out. Sunlight does not always do the flex any favours over a long period either.

That's a better solution. If the circuit in question is not RCD protected, then fit a RCD enabled socket. I would also check your earthing system. I am less keen on sockets wired like this with PME supplies.

Nope, not usually if my reading is correct.
Adding a socket to an existing circuit is ok so long as the addition is not in a special location.
The part P general guidance says:
"g. Outdoor lighting and power installations are special installations. Any new work in, for example, the garden or that involves crossing the garden is notifiable."
A socket on a the outside wall does not involve "crossing the garden"
also:
"i. The installation of equipment attached to the outside wall of a house (for example security lighting, air conditioning equipment and radon fans) is not notifiable provided that there are no exposed outdoor connections and the work does not involve the installation of a new circuit or the extension of a circuit in a kitchen or special location or associated with a special installation."
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

I would have thought an exterior socket would count as "exposed outdoor connections" - it's hard to see what else (assuming normal workmanship) that phrase could refer to.
Pete
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On Nov 6, 1:54pm, Pete Verdon

So is a light with the cable entering from behind. So do the kits provided by B&Q, Wickes, and so on.
If you just need power 1-2x a month spring-autumn, but not in the rain. 1) Fit IPx6 external socket w/RCD protection or supplied from an RCD protected circuit 2) Create decent extension lead in 1.5mm Arctic or H07RNF (tougher) flex with BS1363/A rubber socket on the end. You may want to fit a 13A switched fused connection unit as isolator on the inside so you can turn off if it does rain (rather than opening a wet but live socket with water running everywhere).
If you need it in the rain, you really need to internal 13A SFCU CW gland, SWA of right size re 17th voltage drop (power/lights), CW gland to waterproof socket in garage. There are issues about exporting a PME/ TN-C-S house earth if the garage is damp, any incoming services etc.
In 2006 I replaced an SWA first laid in 1984 (armour CPC crunched when cable twisted). I actually regret doing so - firstly it saw off an expensive bamboo & money tree which by size were 700+, secondly I only needed it occasionally during daylight. If it failed again I would use a Geweiss Interlock Switched 16A 230V BS4343 socket (20) and 2.5mm H07RNF extension to conventional 13A BS1363/A rubber socket. BS4343 in interlock-switched solves the problem of unshuttered sockets in domestic (can't withdraw the plug without turning power off). BS4343 removes an irritating fuse in extension lead. I could use 32A to permit 4mm H07RNF (albeit with 16A CPD, technically a no-no but done for Vdrop reasons).
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Pete Verdon wrote:

Well no more so than any other box screwed to the wall with a wire running into the back of it - like the security light or air con unit explicitly mentioned in the guidance notes.
I would take an exposed outside connection to mean something like a cable join, or a glanded connection to an enclosure etc.
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

Ah, OK, I assumed it to mean the connection provided by the socket itself, not the connection of the supply cables to it. It's a rather poorly-drafted piece of regulation actually.
Pete
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Pete Verdon wrote:

Poorly conceived, drafted, implemented, you name it! (you can tell I am a fan can't you ?)
--
Cheers,

John.

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David WE Roberts wrote:

B&Q do a really nice kit which has an outdoor socket, cable & an RCD plug. The socket is pre wired, the other end of the cable is even trimmed to fit the RCD plug. About 14. The instructions say it avoids Part P.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 19:40:24 GMT, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Yep as it a plug in system rather than permenant wiring. It's a bit of bodge is some respects but at least it is RCD protected and can be unplugged when not in use (stops people stealing your power).
--
Cheers
Dave.




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The Medway Handyman wrote:

I expect the bulk of the folks buying something like that have never heard of part P anyway!
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

I find a lot of people are vaugely aware that 'the law has changed', but thats it, they don't know about Part P.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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On Nov 7, 11:11am, "The Medway Handyman"

Does not help when everyone and their dog says "you are not allowed to do that / anything anymore / law is SI2004". SI2004 was a disgrace in that it gave a ridiculous gold plated screwdriver to fitters over engineers, pure 1970s "we will strike if he picks up my screwdriver or he picks up my spanner". In the NW the BNP-Fitters-Guild is mostly out of control and they wonder why so many companies keep blacklists (which makes things worse because they just go into domestic electric & gas and milk the few customers they can get as they can until their name/business collapses). Britain went back 30yrs.
Nothing to do with safety, portable/plug-in appliances are still a significant problem over fixed wiring.
Had safety been the real driver it could have been made very simple indeed: 1 - Capped fee of 50 2 - Gardens - check & test RCD protection, earthing suitable re export/ rod, cable type & sizing correct. 10mins. 3 - MEB & Supp - correct re ESQW. 5mins. 4 - Any new f.c. RCD protected - test of RCD performance. 10mins. 5 - Any generator system - correct re ESQW. 20mins. 6 - BS7671 required by all, no body-made-up-named-by-us-standards
Best people to do it would be electrical companies - garden export of earth, MEB & Supp is of direct importance to them re ESQW, generator is of direct importance to them re ESQW; only extra bit is checking RCD presence & operation on any new circuit. Keeping the electrical contractor industry out of it - or directly competing with it to enforce competition.
Gas could have been handled similar - anyone can do anything EXCEPT connect up, undoing the meter connection requires reset by Transco and easy to add GSM for leak/fault/tamper anyway. Connection requires 50 inspection by gas company. Ireland has no GasSafe and no statistically significant difference in incidents compared to the UK.
The 50 inspection fixes nothing, just indicates what is wrong & must be fixed before connection. Instead we have 200+ fee which is better spent on better quality components & using RCBO in place of RCD.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
something like:

You've spouted this bollocks before.
Yes, it does. http://www.energycustomers.ie/gas/safety.aspx
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Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

It does now, but that is a recent change. Prior to that it had no equivalent.
--
Cheers,

John.

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