Duplicating my wireless router's signal downstairs with same ID and password

I've got a wireless router upstairs and plugged into it is a CAT5 cable that goes downstairs to a small "switch".
I've got a router device plugged into the switch that broadcasts wi-fi downstairs so I get a good signal there too BUT it's got a separate ID and password from the main router upstairs.
Can anyone point my to a way of "duplicating" the wireless signal downstairs so I can use the same ID and password downstairs as well as upstairs.
They must exist but not sure where to start - and I don't want a device that uses the mains cable to carry the signal as of course I have my CAT5 cable in place.
Thanks
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On Sun, 24 Jan 2016 07:58:23 -0800, Murmansk wrote:

Doesn't the signal from one router reach the other floor? There's normally no problem there.
But just change the SSID and password so they're both the same. Or set your devices up to connect to either, and they'll swap over once one is unreachable.
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On Sun, 24 Jan 2016 07:58:23 -0800 (PST), Murmansk

With the setup you have there, simply change the SSID and password of the downstairs access point to match that of upstairs. Use a different radio channel for best effect.
There is a device called a wireless repeater, and it's possible that the router you are using downstairs has that facility. It associates itself with your upstairs AP as a client and behaves as an AP in its own right, and does not need the cable between them. I mention this only for completeness, your current setup is an even better solution.
--

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On 2016-01-24 15:58:23 +0000, Murmansk said:

Why do you need a switch? If one router is the main one on ADSL/cable you can simply run Ethernet from one of its ports to a port on the other router. But for the second router to act as a wireless access point you need to disable DCHP on it so it works as a hub or switch....
This is what I do in our house from a Virgin cable router (which aso broadcasts on two wireless frequencies, so we have three Wi-Fi channels in total). I've not set them up on the same SSID though - I find it better to see what's doing what...
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<<Why do you need a switch?>>
to supply my TV box, smart TV, CCTV camera
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On 2016-01-24 19:42:54 +0000, Murmansk said:

Most routers have four ports though. Do you just leave three empty?
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On 24/01/16 19:42, Murmansk wrote:

well wifi unit performs te same function as a 'switch'
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On 24/01/2016 17:01, John Smith wrote:

You also need to ensure that the IP address in the 2nd router does not conflict with the first router and is not in the DHCP range assigned by the first router.
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Or that it is in the DHCP range assigned by the first router, because it's being assigned via DHCP by the first router. (If it's got a "be an access point, not a router" mode, ticking one box will probably disable its own DHCP server and tell it to get its own address from a different DHCP server.)
But if it's already working properly with a seperate SSID, he's presumably already sorted that bit.
Maybe the OP could tell us what the device is. If it's something like a TL-WR702N, that would answer the "why a switch and a router" question - not all routers have multiple ports for wired connections.
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TL-WR702N, that would answer the "why a switch and a router" question - not all routers have multiple ports for wired connections. <<
Nearly right it's a TP-Link TL-WR710N !
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On Sunday, 24 January 2016 16:58:29 UTC+1, Murmansk wrote:

I have the reverse problem. I have a perfectly functional wireless system that covers the house. I also have an old PC that doesn't have a wireless dongle, and an old wireless router with an ethernet port.
Can I get the router to join the wireless network, and then route from the PC? So the connection would look like:
ADSL socket---Router - - w i f i - - Router--ethernet--PC
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On Thu, 28 Jan 2016 06:42:37 -0800, Martin Bonner wrote:

Depending on the router, yes, but isn't it just easier to buy a cheap USB wireless dongle? They're less than a fiver, delivered, from a whole raft of vendors.
http://www.kikatek.com/P266742/WL-700N-RXS-Dynamode-WL-700N-RXS-802-11n- Nano
is just one who comes up on a quick google...
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On 28/01/2016 14:42, Martin Bonner wrote:

Not sure it is really worth the effort. Most clients will remember more than one set of network credentials.

Wouldn't it be easier to put a cheap wireless USB dongle on the old PC? Morgan have some nice high power ones that are ideal for experimenting with cantennas since it doesn't hurt if you fry one. Even Hackintosh compatible if you are lucky and get the right chipset one.
http://www.morgancomputers.co.uk/product_detail/11802/Dynamode-Wireless-N-Dongle-Antenna/
With removable antenna - many others are cheaper but this one is ideal for challenging environments since you can put the antenna where it gets a decent signal (not up against a wall behind a noisy PC).
After you enable internet sharing on the PC you get
ADSL --Router - - wifi - - dongle --PC--Router'

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Search for your router model and "bridge mode" or "wireless bridge" (though the latter sometimes gets misused for repeaters).
The answer may be "yes, just tick the right box on the router UI", "yes, after reflashing the router with open source firmware", or "no, not unless you reverse engineer enough to write your own firmware".
http://www.cnet.com/uk/how-to/reuse-an-old-router-to-bridge-devices-to-your-wireless-network/
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