Beginners guide to network switches

Regulars may recall that I ran CAT 5 cable direct from modem to son's room, to give him the full benefit of our high speed connection. The cable in his room terminates in a single wall socket.
Now, he wants multiple sockets, to add Xbox etc. Would the simplest solution be to spend a tenner or so on a switch? I've never used a switch. Wiring is simply a CAT5 cable from the wall socket to the switch then similar cables from the switch to PC, Xbox etc? Any complicated set up or plug and play?
Looking at a D-Link DES-105/B 5 Port 10/100 Metal Housing Desktop Switch from Amazon, or possibly a cheaper option such as Edimax 5 port 10/100 Switch at less than a fiver from eBuyer.
Thanks!
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Graeme

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News wrote:

Nothing complicated, it really is as simple as it seems to install, despite the whizzy technology inside.

My advice is for the negligible extra cost make sure you get a Gigabit switch even though you have no use for the additional speed now.
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Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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The devices just seem to work on most routers, and although if one used them all together the effective speed of each does go down, most of the time it seems to have no effect even on streaming video is on one of the ports. Brian
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On 5/21/2016 7:35 AM, Mike Barnes wrote:

+1
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News wrote:

Yes, as far as home switches are concerned, they're plug and forget. You could push the boat out and get a gigabit one for a couple of quid more.
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OK, thanks to you both (Mike and Andy). Point taken, and D-Link 5-Port Gigabit Switch ordered through ebuyer, partly because, having read the comments and reviews in another thread, I could not resist the Xenta 163 Piece Rotary Tool and Accessory Kit.
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wrote:

Oh what a shame - so you're not interested in a fully managed (user has control of all the switch settings) switch then? Fits a full size rack.
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AnthonyL

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I prefer KISS!
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wrote:

So do I. I had a customer with a pharmacy, maybe a dozen workstations, EPOS etc, all in a Windows workgroup, all nice and simple, except, for reasons that escape me, someone had installed this expensive managed switch.
I had been asked to install an additional workstation, and the required network cabling had been installed, but all the spare ports on the switch had been disabled and thee was no one available who could administer the switch, so, I had to find a consumer grade D-Link that we normally use for our customers, to split one of the working ports two ways.
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Graham. wrote:

You're lucky the BOFH hadn't enabled port security on the switch to limit it to a single MAC address per port :-)
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On Sat, 21 May 2016 20:02:49 +0100, Graham.

Well that's pretty well how I ended up with the Cisco. For some reason the customer I had supplied with hardware and software for years bought the managed switch for his small network. He couldn't get it to work with the Novell server so I got involved. Once I showed him a simple switch would do the job fine he got one from me and gave me the Cisco which for interest I quite easily configured for our near identical Novell network. But I've never found a use for a managed switch also preferring KISS so it's barely ever been used.
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On 22/05/16 10:13, AnthonyL wrote:

I've never seen a managed switch under a sort of thousand up machine network
Where you want certain segments to talk to each other, others not.
Typical use might be fort say 3 segments - two sets of clients one set of servers - where every client can talk to the servers but the clients are not to talk to each other.
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On 22/05/2016 10:40, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I have one on my home network... its quite handy for dropping a not to subtle hint to the sprogs that its too late to be playing minecraft or streaming films etc ;-)

Indeed - quite handy for situations in even small offices where you have two unconnected businesses sharing resources or internet connections, but you want some isolation between them.
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On Sun, 22 May 2016 14:12:52 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

I have four! Sounds bad but...
I need > 24 ports to handle what I have in the house. I went for two 24 port switches rather than a 48 port one because: - if one fails at lesat I have a fallback for important ports - the 48 port one has a fan and will be noisier
Then I discovered I didn't have enough ports in the workshop...so I got an 8 port one. Used up all the ports. Got another 8 port one.
They are all HP 180 models - they were a good price at the time.

I have a little bit of that, and it's handy for security.
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On Sun, 22 May 2016 14:12:52 +0100, John Rumm

You can get 'isolation' between machines on some routers but a managed switch might be good for my mate in the PC shop to isolate customer machines in for repair from his own / shop machines? Or I wonder if you could use the OpenWRT router software (two LAN ports) I installed on his TP-Link cable router to in turn feed two switches (one for the shop and another for the 'guest' machines)?
He would have to have the WSUS server on the guest network as they are the ones that need updating.
Cheers, T i m
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On 28/05/2016 22:32, T i m wrote:

Yup, very much so...

There are lots of ways of doing it. He possibly need a customer wifi network as well - where devices can access the internet, but not see each other or the rest of the LAN

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On Sat, 21 May 2016 10:14:55 +0100, Tim Streater

A local shop I help out with technical stuff is just going 'CloudVoice' (SIP phones) and they ('BT') sent them a 24 port POE switch. Apart from being overkill, they said it was going to cost the shop £330 on the lease. I got them a TP-Link 16 port fanless metal cased 15 port Gb switch for about 60 quid (as they didn't need POE anyway).
It turns out they should have been supplied an 8 port (POE) switch and the £330 they quoted was for that. The 24 port could have been either £500+ or £800+ depending on features! ;-(
POE would have been little use in any case as because of the layout of the building they have a 'star' topology using smaller switches at the ends.
Cheers, T i m
p.s. Years ago I got a call from the boss of a place I wired up with thin ethernet saying 'Our network has stopped working'. I asked if they had any idea 'why' and he said he 'thought the network cables were melted'? Never having heard of that happening before I asked if he had any idea how and he replied 'ah, so you haven't heard about the fire ...'?
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On Sat, 21 May 2016 10:14:55 +0100, Tim Streater

Cisco Catalyst 2900 Series XL
I've got the cupboard too, small wall mounted. Handy for storing bits and pieces in as I don't have to open it to see what's inside.
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AnthonyL

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News wrote:

When you set it up, you need to turn off DHCP in the new switch so that your current modem/switch still remains in charge of allocating IP addresses.
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Bob Minchin wrote:

Not likely to have DHCP ability, not likely to be managed at all.
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