Drawing moisture out of cement

My son-in-law has bought a "build it yourself" "stone" firesurround, The instructions are not very clear. For setting the hearth on a bed of mortar it is a bit ambiguous as to whether wetting the stone is a good or a bad thing - it refers to one or the other drawing the moisture out of the mortar without it being clear as toy wheter this is a good or bad thing.
What would you suggest?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/08/16 19:45, DerbyBorn wrote:

mortar needs to stay wet to set properly, so wet anything porous like bricks that it is to attach to
--
Gun Control: The law that ensures that only criminals have guns.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That isn't how bricklaying and blocklaying is done.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/08/16 22:59, Mike Lander wrote:

actually, it is if the bricks are really sucky.
But with average bricks you simply use a wetter mortar nix on the basis that some of the water will suck into the brick anyway.
--
"When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign,
that the dunces are all in confederacy against him."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They never are and block are a lot more sucky.

The consistency of the mortar is entirely determined by how it needs to be when doing the laying and that is determined by how it sags in use.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/08/16 07:52, Mike Lander wrote:

Exactly. if the bricks suck, you make it wetter so that once the bricks HAVE sucked, you get the right consistency.
Have you actually ever laid a course of bricks?

--
You can get much farther with a kind word and a gun than you can with a
kind word alone.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't in fact do anything of the sort because no bricks suck very much.

Lot more than one course thanks.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/08/16 10:27, Mike Lander wrote:

I doubt it, because I have laid with bricks that suck a HUGE amount

--
Karl Marx said religion is the opium of the people.
But Marxism is the crack cocaine.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/08/16 10:44, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Have a guess who you are replying to ...
--
Adrian C

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snip

Me too, especially with reclaimed bricks that might well have been locally made a long time ago.
--

Roger Hayter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/08/16 11:34, Roger Hayter wrote:

Yup. Te difference between an 'engineering' brick and a cheap'n'nasty soft brick that 'looks traditional' is immense.
--
To ban Christmas, simply give turkeys the vote.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/08/16 11:45, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

http://www.etbricks.co.uk/index.php?p=articles-dampening-bricks-before-laying
has chapter and verse on brick variability and the need for soaking, wetting or WHY.
--
Microsoft : the best reason to go to Linux that ever existed.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Lander wrote:

If it *never* happens why would brick manufacturers or suppliers give instructions on how and when to do it?
"Only with high suction rate bricks in warm weather conditions should dunking (or wetting) of the bricks be considered. If it is undertaken the bricks should not be soaked and only clean fresh water should be used to avoid soluble salt contamination"
<http://www.ibstock.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Ibstock-TIS-A5-BRICKWORK-MORTARS.pdf <http://www.etbricks.co.uk/index.php?p=articles-dampening-bricks-before-laying
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is when I do it! Though it depends a bit on wind, temperature and humidity.
--

Roger Hayter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 9 August 2016 19:59:56 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

+1. Cement needs to stay damp for a number of days to gain strength. OTOH if it's stone, lime would be a bit better.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mortar doesn’t, and isnt there for strength anyway.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

AIUI, it always a good idea to wet any surface that you're going to mortar, not excessively, but just so that the mortar 'takes' to it.
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 9 August 2016 19:45:39 UTC+1, DerbyBorn wrote:

If you wet the stone it won't absorb much water. The idea is that no dust will serve to work as a release agent as in mold release wax. With wet surfaces the lime carries around any dust particles and the bond is stronger.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/08/16 22:38, Weatherlawyer wrote:

Who mentioned lime?
--
Those who want slavery should have the grace to name it by its proper
name. They must face the full meaning of that which they are advocating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/08/2016 22:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Did the OP mention any other kind?
Isn't principle constituent OPC lime?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.