Do floating shelves actually work?

I've put up my own shelves with proper brackets. But I see these "floating shelves" advertised. I thought, "What's holding them up?" Apparently there's no right angle involved, just a screw going straight into the back of the shelf out of the wall. How can that possibly support anything?
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There is usually rods that go into the wall. Can be a bit fiddly to get them in the right place so they slide into the shelf properly.

It's a decent sized pair of rods that stick out of the wall that slide into holes in the shelves with most of them.
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But proper shelves have an angled bracket which can hold a lot of weight. Nothing without a 45 degree support can hold weight. Just try holding a car battery at arms length. Now support your arm at your elbow by using the other arm at 45 degrees.
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wrote

But plenty don't need to hold a lot of weight and prefer the cleaner look of a floating shelf which has no visible brackets at all.

That's wrong too. I do mine that need to hold a lot of weigh with a floor to ceiling rectangular welded frames made of dexion slotted tubing with shelves that are fully adjustable on 25mm spacings with the frames bolted to the walls.

See above.
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So is there anything holding up the shelf apart from at the back?

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wrote

Wrong, I said it's a RECTANGULAR frame, so the is one vertical at the back of the shelf and another at the front at the front of the shelf.

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So real shelves, not this floating shit. Something needs to hold the weight at the front of the shelf, or immense forces appear at the back.
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wrote

Yep, but floating shelves work fine in some situations.

Yes, but the rods sticking out of the wall do that.

Nothing immense about it. That other one you were shown will hold a 100lb weight fine.
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But the leverage. Hold a car battery at arms length with no support under your arm.
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On 5/17/2019 3:03 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:

...

I just did the moment arm balance below -- the rated 100 lb distributed load on a 5" wide shelf is reasonably conservative compared to estimated limits.
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I'd expect the shelves to split at some point. All that weight concentrated on one bit of wood.
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They don't, because that weight presses the top part of the shelf against the rods. The bottom part of the shelf just stops it bending between the rods.

But the wood is in compression and so wont split.
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wrote

They arent at arms length when on a floating shelf.
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On 5/16/19 6:42 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:

To support the shelf properly, you should build support all the way down to the buildings footings.
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On 17/05/2019 11:28, devnull wrote:

Whatever the route, I can say with great confidence that the wall does provide a load path all the way down to the footings. Adding a floating shelf puts a relatively small bending moment on the wall at the anchor points, that's all.
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On 5/17/19 10:45 AM, newshound wrote:

Furthermore, you'll need to get a building permit and have the shelves inspected by the AHJ.
Failure to comply could result in fines and your insurance company could refuse to pay the claim if your house falls over.
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Not required, the wall does that. All you need is to make the bracket not bend from 90 degrees to the wall.
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I hate them. So often they are not tight and slide out leaving stickyout rods that are invisible until you bump into one :-)
Brian
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I don’t actually use them much, but that’s because I prefer proper floor to ceiling shelves. I don’t even have a floating shelf for the shower because I have a window ledge just out of the shower.

Yeah, obviously can be a problem for the blind.

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refer proper

or the

Brian prefers you reply at the top.
I have freestanding dexion shelves in the garage, several shelves in the house made of wood and proper mitred supports, and in the bathroom normal little glass shelves with proper attachments which aren't invisible and can take weight.

are

Or anyone, as the stuff on the shelf is now on the floor broken into pieces.

"

ight

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