DIY help, how can i fix a flaky wall?

I have just striped wallpaper off my wall.
To my surprise the wall is patchy, rough, and flaky. Every time I rub
my hands on the wall or sand the wall, small grins of sand rub off on
the floor.
The solution to the problem will be to re-plaster or re-skim but I
don=92t have the money and I don=92t have the expertise (no how) to
plaster a wall.
Is there an inexpensive way for a DIY novice to solve the problem?
Reply to
trevor_obba
I have just striped wallpaper off my wall. To my surprise the wall is patchy, rough, and flaky. Every time I rub my hands on the wall or sand the wall, small grins of sand rub off on the floor.
The solution to the problem will be to re-plaster or re-skim but I don?t have the money and I don?t have the expertise (no how) to plaster a wall.
Is there an inexpensive way for a DIY novice to solve the problem?
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Reply to
RW
in news: snipped-for-privacy@v29g2000hsf.googlegroups.co m:
Google on "stabilising solution"
The cheapest is probably this one:
which you should be able to find at your local Wilkinsons.
I have used a similar product (a solvent based product from Sandtex, if I remember correctly. I still have some in the shed...). It's a bit like thin varnish, and works well. The words say it's for exterior use - but it works just fine indoors.
Hope this helps
Reply to
Richard Perkin
In message , Richard Perkin wrote
I've successfully used 'exterior' stabilising solution on interior walls after removed the majority of a thick, chalky distemper that had been applied 30+ years previously.
A note of warning - when they suggest well ventilated they mean it - you can get high on the fumes very quickly :)
Reply to
Alan
On Sun, 13 Jan 2008 20:17:00 -0000, "Steve Walker" wrote:
Oh God: good plastering is one of those IMPOSSIBLE things like patting your head and rubbing your stomach at the same time, I takes me 'at off to plasterers.
Stabilization and lining paper is the DIY route methinks!
I know this may be a silly suggestion when everyone else has said stabilizing solution: but wouldn't dilute PVA do? If the surface is porous (it sounds it) wouldn't it get partially absorbed?
Reply to
no spam here, thanks
Plastering, contrary to popular belief, is relatively easy, but I think most people are put off because they've tried to do small patches (around sockets/switches etc, and small repairs) and found it to be 'too dificult' - but like every other job, there is a *specific* method to making it easy (or at least possible, in the case of a novice) and that is to follow recognised steps, plus, doing large patches, IE full walls is *much* easier than doing fiddly bits and a quality finish is far easier to obtain.
for overskimming uneven plaster:
scrape wall of any loose plaster, remove nails/screws etc and apply PVA solution (if using a proper PVA, mix it at 3 parts PVA to 1 part water, if using B&Q's own, mix it at 1:1 as it's already diluted). Start applying at the top of the wall and work downwards, making sure no part is missed. Repeat after 20-30 mins (this coat won't soak in as much)
Before starting to mix, be aware that from the moment you start mixing, the plaster is starting to set, and you only have about 40 mins to get it mixed and on the wall, so make sure you have everything to hand that you will need for the application, including a brush and bucket of water.
Mix plaster using a drill attachment to a smooth paste, the consistency should be similar to mashed potatoes, but slightly wetter.
Novices invariably try to get the plaster off the hawk (handboard) in the same way as they got mortar off to repoint their garden wall, IE by 'slicing' it and trying to pick it up - this is impossible with plaster - the trowel faces upwards and the handboard is manouvered to apply plaster to the trowel. Start at the top left of the wall and work across, applying a thin coat of plaster, continue until the full wall is covered fairly evenly and don't be tempted to try and get it anything like smooth at this stage, the object is to cover the wall, not get out any lines or lumps/bumps. when the full wall is completely covered, clean all tools/buckets/mixing implements with the brush and water. If you have any plaster still mixed, or if you have used it all, mix a small amount (about 50% of what you used on the first coat) and go over the wall again with a second coat - don't go for thickness, all you are doing really here is taking a lot of the marks out of it and filling in any hollows, you need long flowing strokes with the trowel. Once you've second coated it, it should be fairly flat. After 20 mins or so (don't be tempted to try and get all the marks out in one hit - it's impossible) splash a bit of water on the wall and on your trowel and go over it again in smooth runs, you'll see that you are picking up a small amount of 'fat', this is like fine surface filler and is used for that purpose, to fill out any remaining hollows. How smooth you want the wall is up to you and what you intend to do with it, obviously for wallpapering, it doesn't need to be as good as if you intend just painting it.
A few tips: halfway through mixing, take a pointing trowel and scrape all around the insides of the mixing bucket - dry powder sticks to these and decreases setting time, plus, they make hard lumps, which in turn make 'tramlines' in the plaster on the wall, give it a good mixing once this has been scraped into the bucket.
us a pointing trowel to get plaster from mixing bucket to handboard - some people use a spotboard, but I've found it much easier and quicker to scoop.
Don't overfill the handboard, 3 or 4 scoops (about a kilogramme) of mixed plaster is enough.
Keep the back of the trowel clean, that is, the side which has the handle fixed to it, if it builds up plaster around the edges, these will leave marks when trowelling up.
Reply to
Phil L
maybe if I'm allowed to fix the typo relating to PVA...it should be 3 parts water to one part PVA, when using a decent quality PVA.
:-p
Reply to
Phil L

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