Dishwasher salt question

Not striclty a DIY question I know but I hope you'll bear with me.
Recently and suddenly our dishwasher has started leaving us with cloudy glasses (rescued only by hand washing), a "powdery" feel on the porcelain and an almost irridescent smeary mess on the cutlery (which wipes off easily but that's not the point!).
We've not changed any of our chemicals but I did notice the salt doseage controller had been turned down to it's lowest setting (it should be medium).
Would lack of salt explain the results I am seeing?
Thanks Jon
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Yes. Brine solution is used to cleanse the filter bed. No salt, no brine. Lack of squeaky clean stuff and feel good factor. I've used a permutit for about 30 years. Touch wood, it is still working well. How did the dosage controller come to be altered? Nick.
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Also, you have to ensure that the type of salt is correct. It should be almost pure sodium chloride. Too high a concentration of calcium and / or potassium salts will prevent the back-flushing of the filter (which has ionised out the calcium) from working correctly.
Caution. I have not done chemistry since 'O' Level 47 years ago!
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On Sunday, February 23, 2014 8:08:15 PM UTC, Nick wrote:

Thanks. Think I've identified the issue as a knackered gasket meaning very little pressure to the top spray arm.

No idea. Probably the wife accidentally.
Cheers all. Jon
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On 23/02/2014 19:59, Jon Parker wrote:

Yes.
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On 23/02/2014 19:59, Jon Parker wrote:

Never used any Salt in ours ... just a standard dishwaher tablet ... nothing else
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On Sun, 23 Feb 2014 21:41:11 +0000

Same here, and we are in an area officially classified as having "Very Hard" water. We use Fairy Platinum tablets, and have never had any problems.
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Some tablets have a water softener for the final rinse.
Rinse-aid will also help, as it encourages the water to run off the items rather than to dry on them.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On Feb 23, 2014, Andrew Gabriel wrote

I've always assumed the main reason for dishwashers softening the water is to prevent limescale building up on the water-heater.
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On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:09:21 PM UTC, Mike Lane wrote:

Yes, but you'll notice the deposits on dishes very quickly.
The water heaters in washing machines suffer from limescale build up, but none of them have built-in softeners for the washing water that gets heated.
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On Tue, 25 Feb 2014 14:01:20 -0800 (PST)

I have been using ours with the all-in-one tablets, and no salt in the machine's reservoir, using very hard water, for more than three years, and so far, there is no sign of any deposits on anything washed in there. The SS liner of the machine is still sparkling clean and bright.
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They mostly wash at 35-40C.
Hard water scale tends not to come out in any significant amount until the water gets to 50-60C and higher, which dishwashers do. Also, only the detergent cycle is heated in a washing machine which will counter the hard water, whereas the final rinse is normally the hottest cycle in a dishwasher, in order to get the plates hot for drying.
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On Friday, February 28, 2014 12:15:03 PM UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

but none of them have built-in softeners for the washing water that gets he ated.

Only on some washes. I use the 60 degC wash quite a lot.
The electric heater isn't at 35-40C though, it's likely at 80 to 90 degC, depending on how the water cools it and how much limescale is insulating i t. The thermostat just switches it off at 35-40 degC.

My washing machine heater failed in 18 months - 2 years and there were depo sits in the machine. The dishwasher element has been going 8 or 10 years wi thout attention. The previous washer installation (hot fill via a PHX and a softener) kept going for 24 years until the motor expired. The PHX never n eeded any servicing either.
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On Sunday, February 23, 2014 9:41:11 PM UTC, Rick Hughes wrote:

Some dishwasher tablets ( 3-part, powerball, etc) contain some polyphosphate chemicals (forget what exactly) that dispense with the need for salt & softening. It's the same stuff used in Combimate devices.
The cheaper ( e.g. Aldi) tablets which don't have this and will produce the effect described if used without salt. Fine with salt.
Summary; it's limescale.
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Actually you cannot dispense with the need for salt, because the salt circulation does not involve the washing cavity wherein the tablet resides; it being a separate circulation wherein brine is backflushed through the resin block and straight down the drain.
Even with tablets, youstill need salt.
And for those who say that they do not use salt even in a hard water area, you are shortening the life of the dishwasher.
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Without the salt, the water softener doesn't get recharged, but if you don't need the water softener to operate, then you don't need the salt.
Some machines also use the flushed water as a condenser at the end of the drying cycle, but it doesn't matter what's dissolved in it.

You are missing the point that the water softening is built in to some of the tablets.
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On Mon, 24 Feb 2014 17:49:28 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

The supermarket distribution chains are flexible enough to provide ethnic products appropriate to the demographic need.
They fail however to be selective when stocking hard water products in soft water areas like here in Manchester.
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On Mon, 24 Feb 2014 17:07:11 -0000

Please explain.
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wrote:

And I'm curious to know whey my d/w needs salt, even though it's being fed post-softener water.
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Tim

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Tim Streater wrote:

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